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Discussion Starter #1
So my 8 month old female, Delta, does very well when I am with her alone. She still ocasionally nips my legs or hands but much less now then she used to. She also is quite calm on the leash and will heel at my left side and sit when I stop. As long as I'm alone. Anytime she sees another person or dog she begins to pull ahead and won't even bother to look at me. It is very annoying and nakes it hard to control her wherever other people are. I try redirecting with treats and turning around while walking to turn her around but then she will just keep looking backward and not walking. And, if we do approach someone she wants to jump on them and mouth their arms and hands. I just dont know what to do.
 

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Time to reel in adolescence with a prong collar. Check out the Leerburg videos on how to size and use it safely. At the same time find a good trainer who is willing to use the training that fits the dog.
 

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Learn how to use a prong as W.D. stated and if she will sit heel and sit at your side without others around, find someone to help you by appearing from around a building or some other place where they are out of site from a distance. If the dog breaks the sit correct her and you can reinforce the correct response with food and praise. Have the person go back out of sight and repeat. Then gradually decrease the distance.
 

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Thats the ting, i have been using prong and when she lunges I say stop and give a little pop, but it still doesn't seem to deter her very much, I don't want to pop the leash to hard because im scated to damage anything. But I will try what you have suggested and gradually have soneone get closer as she begins to learn. Thank you guys.
 

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At his stage in her training I wouldn't have her sit when seeing a stranger but keeping her active instead in order to focus on you. In a sit she will have too much time to get too worked up. Also I don't give a command before the "pop" as you will be marking the wrong behavior with "Stop!" Instead, as soon as she focuses on you, in that very second, you can tell her "Leave It!
Did you watch the Leerburg video?
 

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it seems you need help with timing and perhaps some unintended back chaining. There is no meeting of strangers until she passes them calmly. I made the mistake of rewarding my gal after she settled after she jumped. She back chained this as if thinking, "see stranger-bark and jump- sit nicely- get treat" OOPs, it took a trainer watching me to catch it. Now if she sees a stranger and reacts we turn around and around until she looks at me and then we move on. If she sees a stranger and responds calmly and with good manners, then she gets rewarded.

It worked for us. It is worth a try. Getting another set of eyes watching you two in action will probably help even more.
 

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Imho, the collar pop has to happen before the lunge, when her muscles tense, forward shift in weight, ears tuning in etc. Maybe you are focusing on what she is looking at rather than what her body is doing thus missing the precise moment for a correction. It took a while for me to understand my boy's body language but once I did, catching the "I'm about ready to react" body language stage required a lot less collar pop force and more willingness to comply with my directions/commands.

Fwiw, once I became really in tune with what his body was telling me and also the clarity of what can be expected if he did this rather than that, it became a lot easier.

Ultimately, I wanted him to be able to make the right choice on his own. It is achievable, but it does take understanding and communication between you and her.

I would also pair a food reward with verbal and touch praise. A scritch under the chin or behind the ears, any sweet spot she has for good behavior. This will help the "feel good" hormones kick in. This last sentence is just my own theory but that's what I did for my boy and it seemed to help a lot.

Just giving some personal info concerning the prong while we were working through his reactivity.

Keep at it, find a trainer you trust, pay attention to your girl as she will tell you what methods work best for her as it will be the method that gets her to behave appropriately with out dousing her spirit.
 

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Thats the ting, i have been using prong and when she lunges I say stop and give a little pop, but it still doesn't seem to deter her very much, I don't want to pop the leash to hard because im scated to damage anything. But I will try what you have suggested and gradually have soneone get closer as she begins to learn. Thank you guys.

An ineffective, nagging correction will just make things worse. Where is the collar fitted around her neck and how tight is it? What size are the prongs? Do you have it on the live ring only or both rings? The advantage of a prong collar over a choke chain is that it is much safer in that it evenly distributes pressure around the dog's neck unlike a choke chain, so you are very unlikely to cause any physical damage. There has to be slack in the leash, a quick, sharp pop, and then immediately slack again. If you kind of pull the collar into what you think is a pop, you are actually creating opposition reflex which will cause the dog to pull harder toward the other person.
 

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At his stage in her training I wouldn't have her sit when seeing a stranger but keeping her active instead in order to focus on you. In a sit she will have too much time to get too worked up. Also I don't give a command before the "pop" as you will be marking the wrong behavior with "Stop!" Instead, as soon as she focuses on you, in that very second, you can tell her "Leave It!
Did you watch the Leerburg video?
She already knows to heel and sit when he stops. The other person or dog is just adding a distraction. If done from a distance and a correction is properly delivered, she will likely deescalate. The person should not appear until the dog has been sitting at heel for a period of time. And figuring out the distance is important. He might have to have someone appear at a distance of 100' to begin. Then it becomes a matter of repetition and closing the gap. Reinforcing with food would likely help. And someone pointed out the timing of the correction is important.
 

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I see corrections and obedience but...

Has anyone yet mentioned engagement? Ask yourself why these other people are more attractive than you?

I would have a ball with me and play with her. My dog could care less about going to other people because I play with him. if the relationship is there you won't have this issue. So pull out a ball and play tug with her.

As far as teh jumping when approached by people, body block them. She MUST sit or she gets nothing. No treat, no attention. If the people can't follow your rules then they don't get to play either. I think this is the hardest thing in the world to teach because so many people are like "ohhh! It's ok if she jumps on me!"
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Ok thank you for the advice guys. As for the prong it is fitted high on her neck beneath the ears and it is 3.25 I believe. The problem is that it is a little loose right now and slips around a bit, but if I take a prong out it is too tight. Im thinking about getting one with smaller prongs to help with this issue. And I do reward her when she does good with treats and praise and I have begun some training with her by having her heel and sit while my brother proggresively gets closer to us. If she sits and waits she gets to interact with him. If she jumps I say no followed by a leash pop. So far it seems to be worki g but we still have a ways to go.
 

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indeed. you have an adolescent dog on your hands. Have fun with her. Make her feel like part of the pack. Be firm and clear with directions. Reward what works and you'll all get through this. If in doubt find a good trainer / mentor who can watch. An extra set of eyes can help a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
So in the morning I put her out in the yard to go to restroom while I get ready to walk her. So she is out alone for around 0 minutes. Then i go out and we play fetch and tug with some obedience such as sitting before I throw the toy or leave it and get it with the tug toy. We go pretty hard fir about 25 minutes so she is panting and less energetic. Then I take her on around a 20 to 25 minute walk. After that i feed breakfast in her kennel and let her wait near 2 hours to prevent bloat from a full stomach. Then we go out again and do some of the same stuff, except we walk a different route or go on a trail for a hike. I let her rest in kennel when she is tired then I bring her to the yard again in the evening we play and go for a walk and then i bring her in for the night and crate her and feed her dinner.
 
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