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Also any advice on treats to get him? He doesn't like most of his treats and the treats he does like is not healthy for him. I have to buy beef and dry it out in the oven and he seems to like that, but i'm not sure if there are any alternatives.
To some extent, treats are a reinforced taste. As you make positive associations with a particular treat, pup will start to like it more and more. It is kind of like loading the 'yes' marker.

After a while, the act of getting the treat is more important than the treat itself. If you really want to get technical... It is the anticipation of the treat (which triggers dopamine) which the dog ultimately finds the most rewarding. Think of someone sitting at a slot machine for hours while slowly losing money

Ole is going through an interesting phase where he prefers a milk bone covered in peanut butter inside a kong rather than a milk bone and peanut butter sitting on a plate. If you put them side by side, he will always pick the kong.
 

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and while in the house try other types of training like a couple have suggested. We have been working on different commands while inside the house and in different rooms. I will tell Karma "go to mom/momma" and she will run to my wife.. She will get praise long enough for me to sneak into another room (we have a small house and i'm a big guy.. sometimes sneaking is hard lol).. Then my wife will give the command "go to dad!" and she will come find me, and get lots of praise. We are now working on doing the same thing with our daughters (monkey and tiny hooman). She will seek out her 'baby' or 'tiny hooman' on command, but this game is rather hard because TH is always near her 'Marma' and follows her everywhere, including mud puddles..another story for another day....

Karma likes her snacks/treats, but is VERY praise driven. My favorite is when she isn't listening to my wife in the kitchen (because she's cooking), and i'll whistle and she will come at me like a freight train, jump on the sofa and derp in my lap because she knows when i whistle, lovings are being given out. For treats we get chicken milk bones or i will grab a handful of her dog food and give them to her one or two bits at a time. This also helps with the impulse control of taking a treat too aggressively, which is important to us because of the littles. When she does take the treat gently, she gets the treat and praise.

Every GSD is different, and our Karma is only just over a year old. They are an amazing breed but MAN can they land shark destroy things lol.. We MAY have lost a few kick balls and may have a few holes in our yard.

While on walks we try going different directions and different routes around town, and to help keep her attention we will also force her to stop and sit at every stop sign, and we will even do the proper 'look both ways' (this helps with the training the humans too! lol) before we proceed. When she does this she will get a treat and we move on our walk.
 

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I find it’s easier to exhaust a high energy/drive dog mentally than physically. Sometimes you can make them run for an hour outside and they’re still a complete basket case when they come back inside. What does your dog value the most? Treats, toys or attention? Take all of those away and make him work for it. My dog currently doesn’t even have a food bowl (the last one didn’t get one until he was a few years old). If he has that much destructive energy, he’s likely very intelligent and should be easier than average to train. He’ll quickly figure out when he has nothing and you have everything, he has to work to earn his rewards. When all of his energy is spent on working, he’ll get tired pretty quickly and become less destructive. Look into IPO training rather than traditional “obedience” training. High energy dogs don’t really fit into the “obedient” dog category (the way people expect a golden retriever to fetch their pipe and slippers and lay at their feet)... they’re more “obedient” in that they always need an instruction to follow. You can teach him a whole array of “circus tricks” around the house to keep his mind occupied... GSDs were bred to do pretty much anything... teaching him to heel, sit and lay down are probably boring him senseless... if he ignores you, it’s because you’re boring (😜 don’t take it personally)... he’s just not interested in whatever crappy (in his mind) treat you’re holding up and he already knows the end result (either he gets it or he doesn’t so who cares, just another day) but if you are in possession of some toy that’s not always laying around on the floor anyway and you have what he wants, he’ll definitely start paying attention... then you have to get your family on board too... I have difficulty with that one also.
Good luck 🙃
 

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Hello all, I've lurked on this website for advice but couldn't really find a scenario close to mine.

My dog levi(7 months old), has recently been acting uncontrollable. He jumps on my parents and sometimes nips his teeth at me when I tell him to stop something. I walk him but we have a small neighborhood so I think I need to do more loops around. I use mostly a prong collar on him(which he constantly pulls on), it is impossible to walk him without a prong collar, although I recently got him an e-collar. He his always hyper and it makes it impossible to have him inside the house, he's mostly outside(which he hates) and when he's inside I have to put him in his cage to prevent him from destroying everything. I agree that he might not be getting enough attention from me, due to the fact that my college classes are very tasking.
I welcome any advice, and will take them into consideration.
Thank you all
Mental and physical stimulation is much needed in this puppy’s life! Researching how to do so will be extremely helpful to you, contact a balanced trainer/a trainer who will be willing to use tools if need be. In your case, it doesn’t sound like your dog will be well suited to just positive training. Applying structure and training in home too will help tremendously
 

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I use beef liver that’s been freeze dried...it comes ready to go in a little pouch from petsmart.
he goes crazy for them and my pup was never food motivated either. using those along with a lot of pets and praise has ton the trick for us. Does your dog have a favourite ball or toy? Maybe try using that to get him excited enough to want to pay attention to you then reward him with it the second he performs a command correctly. Also, immediately correct for mistakes. Don’t let him walk all over ya 😊
 

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Hello all, I've lurked on this website for advice but couldn't really find a scenario close to mine.

My dog levi(7 months old), has recently been acting uncontrollable. He jumps on my parents and sometimes nips his teeth at me when I tell him to stop something. I walk him but we have a small neighborhood so I think I need to do more loops around. I use mostly a prong collar on him(which he constantly pulls on), it is impossible to walk him without a prong collar, although I recently got him an e-collar. He his always hyper and it makes it impossible to have him inside the house, he's mostly outside(which he hates) and when he's inside I have to put him in his cage to prevent him from destroying everything. I agree that he might not be getting enough attention from me, due to the fact that my college classes are very tasking.
I welcome any advice, and will take them into consideration.
Thank you all
If you want my honest opinion.. You should re home him… it is not fair to your dog… I take my German shepherd out every day for an hour 1/2 we climb mountains or walk on the beach… sometimes I have to drive 15 or 20 minutes to find a place that we can walk together… my GSD is a rescue and had a badd beginning so hes nervous in the public so I make sure to take him places where he can feel comfortable… I feel extremely sad for your dog and there is no point to you having him please please please give him to a family where he can live a better life. Milk
 

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If you want my honest opinion.. You should re home him… it is not fair to your dog… I take my German shepherd out every day for an hour 1/2 we climb mountains or walk on the beach… sometimes I have to drive 15 or 20 minutes to find a place that we can walk together… my GSD is a rescue and had a badd beginning so hes nervous in the public so I make sure to take him places where he can feel comfortable… I feel extremely sad for your dog and there is no point to you having him please please please give him to a family where he can live a better life. Milk
That would be my advice if the OP isn't changing his life and his way to live with a young GSD. How are things going by the way OP?
 

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If you want my honest opinion.. You should re home him… it is not fair to your dog… I take my German shepherd out every day for an hour 1/2 we climb mountains or walk on the beach… sometimes I have to drive 15 or 20 minutes to find a place that we can walk together… my GSD is a rescue and had a badd beginning so hes nervous in the public so I make sure to take him places where he can feel comfortable… I feel extremely sad for your dog and there is no point to you having him please please please give him to a family where he can live a better life. Milk
Don’t take this personally but to me, your post sounded more sad than the dog’s current situation. The dog bounces around, wags his tail and clearly loves his family if he doesn’t want to be outside and you’re suggesting they abandon him for someone that will walk him more 😢
It sounds like he’s only left in the crate or outside because he has bad house manners, not because nobody has time... if a dog is a joy to walk, anyone can carve out a few minutes a few times a day to take him for a walk. Shepherds are so loyal that it destroys them to leave their family. I had a dog once that completely tore out the fur from his hindquarters because I was in the hospital for two weeks. He had no separation anxiety or behavioural issues prior to that but once he realized I just left one day and didn’t come back, he went insane. He was fearful and neurotic the whole time I was gone (I’m told). He refused to go on walks and just wanted to sit by the door and wait for me to come back. As soon as I got back, he was perfectly normal again. I could never do that to a dog on purpose unless there was no other option. Sometimes rehoming is the lesser of two evils but I don’t necessarily think it’s as simple as who will walk them more with these types of dogs that will truly bond with their family.
 

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Hello all, I've lurked on this website for advice but couldn't really find a scenario close to mine.

My dog levi(7 months old), has recently been acting uncontrollable. He jumps on my parents and sometimes nips his teeth at me when I tell him to stop something. I walk him but we have a small neighborhood so I think I need to do more loops around. I use mostly a prong collar on him(which he constantly pulls on), it is impossible to walk him without a prong collar, although I recently got him an e-collar. He his always hyper and it makes it impossible to have him inside the house, he's mostly outside(which he hates) and when he's inside I have to put him in his cage to prevent him from destroying everything. I agree that he might not be getting enough attention from me, due to the fact that my college classes are very tasking.
I welcome any advice, and will take them into consideration.
Thank you all
[/

Candidly, after reading the first handful of post I didn't think there was much of real value I could add. But after reading your post a second time. I will offer a personal story.

Let me start with that I'm oldish and you are youngish. I can promise that when I was in college it would have been unthinkable for me to have a puppy and dedicate the time and focus the pup needs and deserves. Now having put four children through college and having raised five GSD's. Here is where I get all patriarchal. I went back and read your post for a third and fourth time. I can hear your the frustration in your words. How you are rationalizing Levi's behaviour is concerning. Not because you're a bad person. Bad people don't go online and ask for advise on dog training. It is concerning because to often by the time a new owner realizes they are in over their head with a GSD pup bad habits are imprinted and key developmental markers that shape the pup's 'personality and build their confidence are lost. The chaos and lack of structure can be traumatizing and imprinted on the pup.
I challenge you to ask yourself a few tough questions.
1. Do you have three hours a day to spend exercises and training levi?
2. Do you have a supportive family that can pitch in and so levi isn't spending long hours alone in the crate.
3. For the next six months are you willing and able to make levi a priority?

If you can't answer all the above questions with enthusiasm and confidence. do right by levi and place her in a home that can. Be brave.
 

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Discussion Starter #51
That would be my advice if the OP isn't changing his life and his way to live with a young GSD. How are things going by the way OP?
It's going a lot better. He's getting more exercise and I'm reteaching him some commands some commands from the past. I still have a long way to go, but I'll put the work in.
 

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Don’t take this personally but to me, your post sounded more sad than the dog’s current situation. The dog bounces around, wags his tail and clearly loves his family if he doesn’t want to be outside and you’re suggesting they abandon him for someone that will walk him more 😢
It sounds like he’s only left in the crate or outside because he has bad house manners, not because nobody has time... if a dog is a joy to walk, anyone can carve out a few minutes a few times a day to take him for a walk. Shepherds are so loyal that it destroys them to leave their family. I had a dog once that completely tore out the fur from his hindquarters because I was in the hospital for two weeks. He had no separation anxiety or behavioural issues prior to that but once he realized I just left one day and didn’t come back, he went insane. He was fearful and neurotic the whole time I was gone (I’m told). He refused to go on walks and just wanted to sit by the door and wait for me to come back. As soon as I got back, he was perfectly normal again. I could never do that to a dog on purpose unless there was no other option. Sometimes rehoming is the lesser of two evils but I don’t necessarily think it’s as simple as who will walk them more with these types of dogs that will truly bond with their family.
Thank you for this comment. Makes me want to put more effort on him.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
My answer to all those questions is yes. I just need to have a full discussion with my family, and I'm sure they'll comply
 

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Thank you for this comment. Makes me want to put more effort on him.
I’m happy to hear that :)
Keep in mind, GSDs were bred to be working dogs. Even if you bought a perfectly trained 7 month old puppy from a trainer, that puppy likely would have spent a majority of its life in a crate also. They only come out to train and they go back in. Professional trainers don’t spend 24 hours with their dogs, hiking through the woods for hours everyday either. If everybody takes him for a 5 minute walk around the block a few times a day (with some additional other exercise), that will work just fine... in addition to coming out of the crate for half an hour each time to “train”. The more training he gets, the more he’ll naturally come out of the crate. The crate is even a tool for training so you’re halfway there. My rule for a training session when starting out is 2 corrections or 3 rewards (whichever comes first), then back in the crate for them to amuse themselves and reset their brain... any more than that at first and they start to lose their drive and become uninterested. If you try that a few times for a few days, you’ll be able to gauge how much you can build that up and keep him interested and he’ll start to learn that the longer he behaves and does what you want, the longer you pay attention to him. It might take him a few weeks to forget all his bad habits but if your family stays consistent and puts him back in his crate the moment he starts goofing off, not after 5 minutes of goofing off and negotiations, he’ll make the association. If you pay attention to all his bad habits, I’ll bet my life that every bad thing he does around the house is a series of things he knows will get a reaction out of everybody. That’s him figuring out how to get attention and playtime with his favorite toys (your family). You can rework all of those behaviours into things you WANT him to do, you just have to outsmart him. If you only go after your own belongings like shoes and coats, put all those things away and pretend dog toys are just as important to you. He doesn’t actually care if it’s a shoe or a squeak toy, he just wants the interaction. He’s working your prey drive for your own things ;)
 

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Thank you for this comment. Makes me want to put more effort on him.
Look, if everyone who had a less then perfect home gave up their dogs we would have a lot of homeless dogs. Situations like yours bother me a lot less then purse dogs. Lol.
Pics would be nice. Can we see this beast of yours?
 

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It is critical for all dogs, especially growing puppies, to get full range exercise for joint, overall and mental health too. Mental stimulation can NOT provide this necessary health benefit. Without it, do expect your dog to act out and express bad behaviors. Don't blame the dog for what you have created.

Provide your dog with proper physical and mental care and watch miracles begin to happen. Feed you dog well, give him ample access to fresh water, give him appropriate exercise on natural surfaces, and... address his drives.

Addressing drives, aka mental stimulation, can easly be done by allowing a dog to simply sniff new and interesting things in varying environments. You don't need to do back flips to keep a German Shepherd entertained. Teach your dog the behaviors that you want. Stop correcting a puppy for behaviors you don't want because he does not understand what you expect from him.

Pick a training method. Don't get lost in too many different training styles. Teach your puppy yes and no markers. Teaching your dog how to respond to leash pressure is always a good thing. Start slow in your house with very short sessions. Gradually add duration, distance and distractions. Take two or three steps backwards if your dog becomes overwhelmed by premature expectations.
 
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I’m happy to hear that :)
Keep in mind, GSDs were bred to be working dogs. Even if you bought a perfectly trained 7 month old puppy from a trainer, that puppy likely would have spent a majority of its life in a crate also. They only come out to train and they go back in. Professional trainers don’t spend 24 hours with their dogs, hiking through the woods for hours everyday either. If everybody takes him for a 5 minute walk around the block a few times a day (with some additional other exercise), that will work just fine... in addition to coming out of the crate for half an hour each time to “train”. The more training he gets, the more he’ll naturally come out of the crate. The crate is even a tool for training so you’re halfway there. My rule for a training session when starting out is 2 corrections or 3 rewards (whichever comes first), then back in the crate for them to amuse themselves and reset their brain... any more than that at first and they start to lose their drive and become uninterested. If you try that a few times for a few days, you’ll be able to gauge how much you can build that up and keep him interested and he’ll start to learn that the longer he behaves and does what you want, the longer you pay attention to him. It might take him a few weeks to forget all his bad habits but if your family stays consistent and puts him back in his crate the moment he starts goofing off, not after 5 minutes of goofing off and negotiations, he’ll make the association. If you pay attention to all his bad habits, I’ll bet my life that every bad thing he does around the house is a series of things he knows will get a reaction out of everybody. That’s him figuring out how to get attention and playtime with his favorite toys (your family). You can rework all of those behaviours into things you WANT him to do, you just have to outsmart him. If you only go after your own belongings like shoes and coats, put all those things away and pretend dog toys are just as important to you. He doesn’t actually care if it’s a shoe or a squeak toy, he just wants the interaction. He’s working your prey drive for your own things ;)
Woah this is very informative thanks. Can you tell me more about the 2 corrections or 3 treats method?
 

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MAWL mentioned leash pressure and I found this

 

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Woah this is very informative thanks. Can you tell me more about the 2 corrections or 3 treats method?
It’s mostly to teach communication rather than actual “training”. It communicates what’s correct and what’s not correct in really small doses so he’s not overloaded with information and more confused than before. If you bring him out give him a command you know for sure he’ll do right, and if he does it, give him a reward. If you have to correct him 2 times, put him back in his crate because he’s just going to start losing his confidence and the corrections will lose their meaning... then come back a few minutes later and do it again. It teaches them several things, an important one is that when he’s out of the crate, he’s under control at all times... also a fun bit of psychology is that when you walk into a room through a doorway, your mind resets... try it right now... walk out your front door and stand there and see what happens to your brain... it’s kinda cool 😂
 

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It’s mostly to teach communication rather than actual “training”. It communicates what’s correct and what’s not correct in really small doses so he’s not overloaded with information and more confused than before. If you bring him out give him a command you know for sure he’ll do right, and if he does it, give him a reward. If you have to correct him 2 times, put him back in his crate because he’s just going to start losing his confidence and the corrections will lose their meaning... then come back a few minutes later and do it again. It teaches them several things, an important one is that when he’s out of the crate, he’s under control at all times... also a fun bit of psychology is that when you walk into a room through a doorway, your mind resets... try it right now... walk out your front door and stand there and see what happens to your brain... it’s kinda cool 😂
😂 Makes a lot of sense. I notice that sometimes he seems a bit lost, so having him reset will be helpful. In the morning I always have him sit before I open his cage, and then wait before I give him permission to come out but there are time when it seems he doesn't know how to sit, I'd ask him to sit clearly and he'd just stare into my eyes like he's not sure what I'm asking for. But he sits well when he knows there is a treat involved so I think hes just been stubborn.
 
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