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Hello all, I've lurked on this website for advice but couldn't really find a scenario close to mine.

My dog levi(7 months old), has recently been acting uncontrollable. He jumps on my parents and sometimes nips his teeth at me when I tell him to stop something. I walk him but we have a small neighborhood so I think I need to do more loops around. I use mostly a prong collar on him(which he constantly pulls on), it is impossible to walk him without a prong collar, although I recently got him an e-collar. He his always hyper and it makes it impossible to have him inside the house, he's mostly outside(which he hates) and when he's inside I have to put him in his cage to prevent him from destroying everything. I agree that he might not be getting enough attention from me, due to the fact that my college classes are very tasking.
I welcome any advice, and will take them into consideration.
Thank you all
 

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This story is heartbreaking! You admit that your pup is under exercised and under stimulated mentally, but continue to react to his excess energy as a disciplinary issue!

If you don't have the time and energy to give him a good life, please find him a new home!
 

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He needs more exercise. He needs training. He needs structure.
Apologies, but it sounds like you aren't providing it.

Take him for enough exercise that he actually drains a bunch of his energy. The amount is different for each dog.Then you can start dealing with these issues. Once you know how much exercise he requires, ask yourself if you can provide this daily.
Fixing the behavior is relatively simple once his daily needs are taken care of.
 

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Why did you get a German Shepherd? Better get a Greyhound for your current life style. They are fine with a couch and a walk around the block. Unless you drastically change your life style and educate yourself on GSDs, rehome him before he becomes unmanageable and unadoptable. But glad that you are here with your questions though. Please take all the advice given, seriously. We all have the best intentions.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
He needs more exercise. He needs training. He needs structure.
Apologies, but it sounds like you aren't providing it.

Take him for enough exercise that he actually drains a bunch of his energy. The amount is different for each dog.Then you can start dealing with these issues. Once you know how much exercise he requires, ask yourself if you can provide this daily.
Fixing the behavior is relatively simple once his daily needs are taken care of.
Thank you, I'll put more effort into this. We used to go on 1 hr walks (back and forth combined) in my old neighborhood and we'd play fetch for another hour later in the day, but my new neighborhood is very small so there is no where to walk to without getting on the main road. I started watching videos on using him on a treadmill which can help him burn energy more. But if that doesn't work out, I'll definitely start driving to a park or find another way to exercise him.
Thank you
 

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Discussion Starter #6
He needs more exercise. He needs training. He needs structure.
Apologies, but it sounds like you aren't providing it.

Take him for enough exercise that he actually drains a bunch of his energy. The amount is different for each dog.Then you can start dealing with these issues. Once you know how much exercise he requires, ask yourself if you can provide this daily.
Fixing the behavior is relatively simple once his daily needs are taken care of.
Thanks for the reply, I plan to take all the advice. I love this dog and waswas on the right path once where we would work out most of this energy but my new neighborhood makes it almost impossible to have a long walk. But that shouldn't be an excuse, I'd start working on new ways to exercise him.
Thank you
 

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Discussion Starter #7
This story is heartbreaking! You admit that your pup is under exercised and under stimulated mentally, but continue to react to his excess energy as a disciplinary issue!

If you don't have the time and energy to give him a good life, please find him a new home!
You read me wrong, I admit that he doesn't get as much attention as he used to from me. That's why I came to this website for help, I'm changing that and finding more ways to exercise him but your advices would be a great help.
 

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Thanks for the reply, I plan to take all the advice. I love this dog and waswas on the right path once where we would work out most of this energy but my new neighborhood makes it almost impossible to have a long walk. But that shouldn't be an excuse, I'd start working on new ways to exercise him.
Thank you
Do you have a yard where you can play fetch or with a flirt pole? Honestly, on leash walks usually aren’t enough for a young shepherd, even if you go multiple miles. They need the chance to run. I view leash walks more as mental stimulation. Sure, it’s some exercise and better than none, but in my opinion, it more takes energy off the top rather than actually draining.

I can walk my guy for two hours, about three miles, and he naps for at most two solid hours, then is ready to go again. Then throughout the day we play fetch and sometimes with the flirt pole. But if I take him somewhere off leash for an hour or more, he’s exhausted and done physically for the day. Is there anywhere you can take your pup on a long line so he can run?
 

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Do you have a yard where you can play fetch or with a flirt pole? Honestly, on leash walks usually aren’t enough for a young shepherd, even if you go multiple miles. They need the chance to run. I view leash walks more as mental stimulation. Sure, it’s some exercise and better than none, but in my opinion, it more takes energy off the top rather than actually draining.

I can walk my guy for two hours, about three miles, and he naps for at most two solid hours, then is ready to go again. Then throughout the day we play fetch and sometimes with the flirt pole. But if I take him somewhere off leash for an hour or more, he’s exhausted and done physically for the day. Is there anywhere you can take your pup on a long line so he can run?
I got a long leash for this purpose since my backyard isn't fenced but it ended up being too short I have a longer one on the way so hopefully that's long enough. And as soon as I get the backyard fenced, it should be a lot easier.
 

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Many people get up in the morning and drive to a park or wilderness area to run or jog, with a dog. There are dog owners in New York City on this board who also manage to get their dog plenty of exercise. This isn't an neighborhood issue--you will do it if it's important to you.

I don't think that a treadmill can duplicate the experience of a long walk. Getting outside in fresh air to see and sniff is incredibly important to their mental well being. The mental experience of new smells, sounds, and encounters is important to them, and they most want to share that experience with their person -- it's a key facet of how they connect with us.

Do some research on all the city/county parks, or state hiking trails within a 30 minute drive. Add a few more that are 30-60 minutes away on weekends. Change up your routine. You may find that a morning outing with your dog in nature every morning makes your college studies much less stressful!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Many people get up in the morning and drive to a park or wilderness area to run or jog, with a dog. There are dog owners in New York City on this board who also manage to get their dog plenty of exercise. This isn't an neighborhood issue--you will do it if it's important to you.

I don't think that a treadmill can duplicate the experience of a long walk. Getting outside in fresh air to see and sniff is incredibly important to their mental well being. The mental experience of new smells, sounds, and encounters is important to them, and they most want to share that experience with their person -- it's a key facet of how they connect with us.

Do some research on all the city/county parks, or state hiking trails within a 30 minute drive. Add a few more that are 30-60 minutes away on weekends. Change up your routine. You may find that a morning outing with your dog in nature every morning makes your college studies much less stressful!
Awesome, I really appreciate it. I found a park that's not a far drive from me. I walked him around the neighborhood today for around 50 mins. It will help to change the scenery tho since it will start to bore him looping around the same neighborhood like 4 times in a row.
Thank you
 

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Hello all, I've lurked on this website for advice but couldn't really find a scenario close to mine.

My dog levi(7 months old), has recently been acting uncontrollable. He jumps on my parents and sometimes nips his teeth at me when I tell him to stop something. I walk him but we have a small neighborhood so I think I need to do more loops around. I use mostly a prong collar on him(which he constantly pulls on), it is impossible to walk him without a prong collar, although I recently got him an e-collar. He his always hyper and it makes it impossible to have him inside the house, he's mostly outside(which he hates) and when he's inside I have to put him in his cage to prevent him from destroying everything. I agree that he might not be getting enough attention from me, due to the fact that my college classes are very tasking.
I welcome any advice, and will take them into consideration.
Thank you all
It seems he needs some training outside of the "exercise lack" part of this problem. Nipping at you is not a light problem. It sounds like a lack of respect, leadership, and training. Nipping should be strongly corrected. What training has he had? How do you use the prongs?
Be extremely careful with e-collars; they take some learning and can cause big problems if used in an inexperienced way.
 
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It seems he needs some training outside of the "exercise lack" part of this problem. Nipping at you is not a light problem. It sounds like a lack of respect, leadership, and training. Nipping should be strongly corrected. What has he been taught? What do you mean by impossible to use the prongs? How do you use them?
Be extremely careful with e-collars; they take some learning and can cause big problems if used in an inexperienced way.
He has been taught the basic sit, down, paw, stay commands. I'm trying to teach him to drop things, but my family makes it hard since they chase him around making that his play time and whenever I try to get him to settle down and to drop he thinks we are playing and then runs off with his tail wagging.
Whenever we are on walks, he pulls with the prong collar. Although I think it's because it's a bit to big for him, but if I remove a link it becomes too small so I'm just waiting for him to grow a bit more into it currently.

And I think I used the word nip wrongly. He has never bit me but kinda just little gnashing of his teeth, not verbal or aggressive at all but you can tell it's his way of trying to not listen.

And yeah the e-collar can be dangerous and that's why I make sure I'm the only one who uses it, since I'm the only one who watched a lot of videos on it. When I first got it I started light and tried to use the vibrate and that freaked him out, and I've never had a good experience with the vibrate. What really worked is the shock, but I keep it low. And I haven't used the shock collar for a while since I need to reteach him somethings before I can correct him from doing otherwise. He's also not food driven in the least and that makes it harder.
 

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He has been taught the basic sit, down, paw, stay commands. I'm trying to teach him to drop things, but my family makes it hard since they chase him around making that his play time and whenever I try to get him to settle down and to drop he thinks we are playing and then runs off with his tail wagging.
Whenever we are on walks, he pulls with the prong collar. Although I think it's because it's a bit to big for him, but if I remove a link it becomes too small so I'm just waiting for him to grow a bit more into it currently.

And I think I used the word nip wrongly. He has never bit me but kinda just little gnashing of his teeth, not verbal or aggressive at all but you can tell it's his way of trying to not listen.

And yeah the e-collar can be dangerous and that's why I make sure I'm the only one who uses it, since I'm the only one who watched a lot of videos on it. When I first got it I started light and tried to use the vibrate and that freaked him out, and I've never had a good experience with the vibrate. What really worked is the shock, but I keep it low. And I haven't used the shock collar for a while since I need to reteach him somethings before I can correct him from doing otherwise. He's also not food driven in the least and that makes it harder.
Have you taught him a proper heel?
 

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Before you correct him for doing all the wrong things, he should know what is right!
He hasn't been taught to properly walk beside you if it wasn't consistent. So of course he pulls! He doesn't know not to. Get something that drives him: food, toys, playtime, praise...anything -better to spend some money on something that drives him that to have an dog you hate walking with- and teach him a proper heel. There are videos everywhere that can help you, or the forum can.
Once he knows what is right, you can correct him for what is wrong.
When he pulls, DO not pull back! It will work against you, as it is the nature of dogs (called the opposition reflex) to go in the opposite direction when pulled on. The prongs should be slack. When he makes a move to pull, pop him. This is after you teach a proper heel.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Before you correct him for doing all the wrong things, he should know what is right!
He hasn't been taught to properly walk beside you if it wasn't consistent. So of course he pulls! He doesn't know not to. Get something that drives him: food, toys, playtime, praise...anything -better to spend some money on something that drives him that to have an dog you hate walking with- and teach him a proper heel. There are videos everywhere that can help you, or the forum can.
Once he knows what is right, you can correct him for what is wrong.
When he pulls, DO not pull back! It will work against you, as it is the nature of dogs (called the opposition reflex) to go in the opposite direction when pulled on. The prongs should be slack. When he makes a move to pull, pop him. This is after you teach a proper heel.
Thank you, i plan to get on that starting today.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Also any advice on treats to get him? He doesn't like most of his treats and the treats he does like is not healthy for him. I have to buy beef and dry it out in the oven and he seems to like that, but i'm not sure if there are any alternatives.
 

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I use string cheese and chicken hotdogs when I really need to get my dog’s attention.

There’s a lot said on this thread about exercise through walks. I seldom walk my dog for exercise. Walks are generally for exposure for me.
The thing that tires my dog the most, both mentally and physically, is tracking or scent games. It can be as simple as toys or milk jugs hidden in the house or yard. Its low demand for the owner but very stimulating for the dog.
 
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