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Discussion Starter #1
My dog was diagnosed with moderate to severe hip dysplasia today and I am completely at a loss. He is very much part of my family. My vet doesn't think he will be a good candidate for surgery due to the shallow sockets. Also, due to his age, she thinks he can be well managed with supplements and noninvasive methods. I attached his x-ray. I am looking for any advice or help on what to do, good supplements, etc. I feel so bad for him. :crying:
 

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I'm no expert at reading x-rays, but interested to see what others on the board might comment. To me, the sockets do look shallow. Hopefully some of the more experienced folks with x-rays reading will chime in soon .. @carmspack, @selzer, @cliffson1
 
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Not the best positioning, but I have to agree that it looks like both hips do not have the coverage, and are dsyplastic.

The good news is that it is not a death sentence. How old is your dog? Surgery is a possibility -- depending on what symptoms you are seeing regularly. Go to a specialist. And educate yourself there are several types of hip surgeries. One replaces the hip joint FHO. Another cleans the femoral heads. I think one removes the head. Another cuts the tendon. Some are more and some are less invasive.

There are things you can give the dog to help the joint, things you can do -- low impact exercise, things not to do.
 

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Thank you guys for some feedback. He is 7 months old currently. I got him to be a competition dog (mainly agility) so this is incredibly disheartening for me and him. I am going to speak to a orthopedic specialist next week and get their feedback as well. I'm also looking into some hydrotherapy locations around my area to begin taking him to.

I was looking into the surgeries as well and there is an overwhelming amount of information out there. It's hard to sort through everything in any kind of meaningful fashion. His main symptoms are he shows a lot of stiffness in his back half and will take abnormally long naps after working. I included another view I received, I'm not sure which is better positioning (if either are good positioning).
 

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Thank you guys for some feedback. He is 7 months old currently. I got him to be a competition dog (mainly agility) so this is incredibly disheartening for me and him. I am going to speak to a orthopedic specialist next week and get their feedback as well. I'm also looking into some hydrotherapy locations around my area to begin taking him to.

I was looking into the surgeries as well and there is an overwhelming amount of information out there. It's hard to sort through everything in any kind of meaningful fashion. His main symptoms are he shows a lot of stiffness in his back half and will take abnormally long naps after working. I included another view I received, I'm not sure which is better positioning (if either are good positioning).
Yeah, well, I think surgeries or no surgeries, agility is probably not a good choice for your pup. Novice obedience, Novice Rally, Nosework, maybe other stuff will be fine. But I don't think you should school this dog over jumps.

You might want to have a discussion with the breeder. Do you have a warranty on hips? Most of them require the dog be returned, and by 7 months you are probably attached to the dog. But go back and read through it, and give the breeder a call. It depends on how the warranty reads, if there is one.

Carmspac had a lot of good nutritional advice for hip-health, things you can do to give your puppy the best chances for the least symptoms.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yes, I spoke with the breeder. The good news is his contract has guaranteed hips for life and if there are issues, we can receive a refund or new puppy whenever we're ready (and there is an available litter) without having to return him. That was a huge relief to me since I am rather attached! Therefore, worst case scenario at this point is I manage any pain for him and keep him working in low impact sports and get another little monster to do the higher impact sports like agility. I also have OFA records for both his parents and they are both Excellent by OFA but I know it can still happen unfortunately.

I have been told that at best the hip is loose and at worse he has dysplasia by the multitude of people I've talked to since his initial diagnosis. There seems to be a general consensus that the x-rays aren't fantastic positioning.

After talking to just about whoever I could think of (the vet, 2 orthopedic specialists, the breeder, etc.), I have come up with a plan on putting him on glucosamine supplements and water therapy for the next few months while continuing light impact sports (e.g., nosework, novice obedience, novice rally, etc.). He has not done any jump work at this point in agility (since he is so young and still growing) and only foundation work so I feel comfortable continuing with foundations right now (definitely no jumps). I did talk to the instructor and let her know what is going on so she is aware. I am going to have x-rays done again at a year old with one of the specialists that will hopefully position him better and see where we stand at that point.
 

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It may be really a good idea to talk to Carmen (Carmspac). She has reams of advice on what to feed and what not to feed for health hips. Vitamin C is good, but it has to be the right kind, properly sourced and in a form the dog's system can use it properly.

I am glad you are not going to get another puppy yet. It will be much better to wait until after you have the hips checked after a year. Then there will be a little distance between the two and your foundation work with the current puppy will pay dividends.

Good luck.
 

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I would avoid neutering to maintain the benefit of his testosterone, which assists in muscle development. I you are able to get good muscle on him later on (swimming), it can help keep the joint in place
My first dog was displastic but being muscled helped him into old age. I realize that every case is different though.
 

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Thank you both again for some great advice! I agree with holding off on neutering. We weren't planning on neutering him until he is at least 2 and fully developed anyways but this is just an extra reason why not. We also have a vet near us that performs vasectomies rather than a traditional castration neuter which I will likely opt for when the time comes.

I did hear Vitamin C is good from another source as well so I will try to track down the right type for a dog's system. Somehow I have managed to train him the cue 'Swallow' for pills which makes giving him any medication so much easier when he needs it!

My hubby and I have talked about getting another dog eventually (probably when this guy is about 2 years old or so) even before all this started coming up. I don't think we would be ready for another before then anyways and still have plenty to work on with this little guy! :)
 
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