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Discussion Starter #1
So our wonderful little Jaxon has been earning some trust lately. So, we've started to leave him out of the crate for a few reasons, one being we don't want his left ear to not become erect. So, we've heard, out of the crate = better chance of ear going up.

Fast forward.

Doing great for a week or so. Nothing destroyed.


THEN!

Over the course of the next week, etc:

Expensive recliner chair, cord eaten. (Chair was unplugged of course).
Figures out how to open the bathroom door which is always shut. Tears up the bathroom like it was a tornado happened in the house.
Tore apart a roll of paper towels.
Gets up onto the counters and steals things that aren't his.
Destroys the door jams by chewing.
Destroys a banister railing by chewing.

These are just a few examples.

Here's a video: just for fun!!!

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=155465804612906&set=vb.100004484616626&type=2&theater

Hopefully this will work.


So, I go home today and find the recliner now chewed up on the fabric part. He knows he did something wrong and follows me to the recliner. He looks at the chair, then at me. I grab him and push his nose into the chair and yell at him. Maybe not the right thing to do, but that's what I did. Called him a bad boy in a low loud tone.

When I left to go back to work I put him back in the crate.

How can he earn his way back out now?

:help:
 

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I can't see the video:(
 

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I'd just wait several more months and give freedom in moderation. You said you let him out ALL day. That's too much too soon, let him free while you're gone for 10 minutes picking up some groceries, if nothing's destroyed, okay good. Then maybe an hour, etc. Until you can consistently trust him in those little trips do not leave him out all day.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Lolllllll so true!
 

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The page you requested cannot be displayed right now. It may be temporarily unavailable, the link you clicked on may have expired, or you may not have permission to view this page.

(if desired, you need to set the video to public so that everyone can see it...)
 

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So, I go home today and find the recliner now chewed up on the fabric part. He knows he did something wrong and follows me to the recliner. He looks at the chair, then at me. I grab him and push his nose into the chair and yell at him. Maybe not the right thing to do, but that's what I did. Called him a bad boy in a low loud tone.

When I left to go back to work I put him back in the crate.

How can he earn his way back out now?

:help:
Definitely not the right thing to do...He just learned that when you come home you are mad at him. Dogs really are in the minute and I think you read too much into his looking at the chair.

He has a long way to go before he can earn his way out. And it needs to be in short durations working up to long ones. The first instance of destruction, he would have been back in the crate and not given a whole week to learn what great fun it is to destroy things, I think this is going to make it even harder for him to not destroy things.

He was not being bad; he was just having a grand old time being a dog who does not clearly understand the rules.
 

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Not his fault, your fault. You need to shove your nose in the recliner and yell at yourself, "NO!" several times, and for good measure, take the ripped up paper towels and slap yourself upside the head with them.

You are going from no freedom, no chance to get into trouble, no chance to do anything wrong to handing him the keys to the house and car and giving him the day to do his worst. You set him up. Really. He chews because he is bored, maybe lonely for you, and because it is a self-rewarding behavior.

The best thing to do now is to give him some freedom for short periods of time. The rest of the time, you teach him what he can have and what he can't have. Puppy proof a single room and install a good extra-tall baby gate in the door, and leave him in there during the day, and when you get home, ignore him for a few minutes. Keep comings and goings very low key. WAIT if possible until he quiets down, and then come in and take him out to do his business, a bit of training, etc, and the rest of the evening in with you learning what he can do.

Also before going in the morning, a good long walk and maybe a good game of fetch, so that he is good and tired out before you leave him in his place.

Tractor supply sells a sturdy 10'x5' kennel in panels, that you can set up in a basement or garage. Your dog will be safe there.

What is scary about just giving him the run of the house, is that there are thing in our houses that are dangerous for puppies to eat, stuffing, stuff off of counters, stuff in walls, cleaning stuff, blinds, cords, and so much more. Puppy proof an area, or make him a day-time area where he can have a safe, raw, bone, or a hard rubber toy or two, and a bucket of water, and maybe a cot. Then when you come home, the only thing he can possibly destroy is what is in his area.

And no one gets punished, and no one feels guilty about it.
 

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Shasta is almost three and I still don't trust her out of the crate when we're gone. She sleeps in our room at night out of her crate but thats as far as it goes being unsupervised.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Great advice here. Thanks!!!!
 

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Im sure your intentions were good by letting the dog have his freedom and I understand your concern about his ears, same thing with mine. Sounds like he kept himself busy and did some remodeling around the house lol :) I had my share of it, mine usually will steal fruit out of fruit bowl and drag it all over the living room, after I get home I pick up the fruit (with bite marks on it) and I put it back in the fruit bowl and I get on with my day. I would rather have her do a little remodeling then have her locked up. Yes she is safer in crate, but her crazy puppy months are over and now she sleeps during the day or she will just roam the house and play with her toys. with time they learn what not to do...But at 6 months he is better off in the crate, for his own sake.
 

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Been there & done that. I was told leaving a puppy in the house @ that age is like leaving a 5 year old in the house alone. Everything can be fine for days but then one day the house will be burned to the ground. I never forgot it.:p
 

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Yes, we learned the toughest lesson today. He played home entertainment center repair man. He didn't do a good job.

Completely dismantled the entertainment center. Ate the DirecTV cords. Ate the XBOX Kinect. Ate the cable to the Internet router. Ate the subwoofer for the home theatre system.

We have learned our lesson.

LOL.

It's just stuff. We aren't that concerned about that.

What I'm shocked at is how he moved a very, very heavy entertainment system and got at all the cords. We were very lucky that he started by unplugging the wall unit from the wall.

Very lucky. Lesson learned.

Puppy now gets to live in the crate when we're not at home. No more of this nonsense.

He gets snipped next weekend too.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
We go home for lunch everyday, as we only work about 1.5 miles away from home. Today when I went in the house he was sitting in the crate with both ears down looking so dejected and sad. I literally don't know what to do with him at this point. Poor guy.

I leave him out, he parties it up in the house and destroys everything Project X style.

I can't leave him in the yard, he'll eat our flowers and dig all the dirt out of the flowerbeds.

I can't put him in a kennel outside or he'll bark his face off all day at the squirrels and rabbits and piss off the neighbors.

I don't have any rooms in the house to confine him to, as our home is open concept and no door jams for gates.

I can't leave him in the garage for many reasons. Way too much fun in there for him to have, and it's really hot in summer.

He's literally his own worst enemy right now.

He is at the top of his class at doggie obedience classes each week. Wins all the prizes. Is a model dog, until we leave him alone for more than 15 minutes alone.

LOL.

We play with him all the time. We take him to doggie day care to run with 100 other dogs for 10 hours a day. He's having a grand old time. We take him on walks for 45 minutes.

Right now he's just unable to deplete all his puppy energy I guess.
 

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I think he meant the ears were just folded back or whatever looking sad.

You can try a large xpen? I bought this heavy-duty one Amazon.com: BestPet® Black 40" Heavy Duty Pet Playpen Dog Exercise Pen Cat Fence B: Pet Supplies that's 40 inches tall but I think they have a taller one, he may be able to escape though, but it's really big and successful here at my place.
I would honestly not worry about the sad puppy face, he'll get used to it, I mean he went from whole house freedom to back in the cage - boo, just give him a good exercise before and after and he'll be perfectly okay
 

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Gus is 1.5 years and gets run of the main rooms now and left with something of HIS to chew on. Still at his age if he's left alone for over 6-7 hours he will find something else to chew up, so I don't leave him alone that long. our 5 month old dobe is ALWAYS crated when we leave.
 

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My first GSD I did everything wrong with. I thought crates were cruel. The ten week old puppy would be kept in the kitchen by a baby gate. Every day he would take everything that wasn't nailed down and chew most of it, and leave it all in a huge pile on the floor in the kitchen. He would also chew the tiles in the kitchen, and he would add a few turds and some urine.

Every day after a rough day at work, I would get home to this mess, and blow my top, so much so that the poor pup would piddle when I came in.

One day he broke through the baby gate and ate my couch, literally.

This was the dog I had longed for all my life, the intelligent, highly trainable, beautiful, loyal German Shepherd Dog. He was in fact, a bi-color, drop eared, stubborn as an ox, super high energy, impossible to train, and somewhat aggressive German Shepherd Dog, that needed training and exercise that I could not give him while working full time and finishing college. Be that as it may be.

Finally, I had had enough and chained him in the back yard.

He dragged the chain through a circle and created a mud pit. So that now I came home after a long day at work to a very muddy puppy. When he was covered in mud, I fed him and watered him and did not bother to take him off the chain.

One day he broke off the chain and ran in front of a truck and got hit. It shattered the long bone in his leg. My neighbor and I took him to the vet. I felt awful.

To put a rod in, it would cost $2000 and this was back around 20 years ago or so. I did not have it. I could barely pay the rent, my job was always having wage freezes, and kept asking us to take voluntary time off. So the vet told me to get a crate, large enough for him to stand, lay down, turn around and eat in, no larger. And to leave him in the crate for 8 weeks, letting him out twice a day, on lead to potty.

I thought this would be awful.

It was not.

He actually did not mind the crate at all, even after he was healed. The leg healed crooked, but it healed. I got another six years out of him. And he was back in the house, because when I wasn't there, he was crated. Eventually, I moved and put a kennel up so that when I left in the morning, I kenneled him outside. But he was fine in the crate. He was safe kenneled or crated.

He was not safe loose, either outside or inside when he was a puppy. When he got older I could leave him loose in the house. But I always felt better with him if he was contained in some way. I think he was happier have clear boundaries, whether crated or kenneled.
 
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