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My 6.5 month old has started guarding our room, background, we live with my parents, sister her kids. Teddy sleeps with me and spends a lot of time with me in our room. So far she is guarding against the other dog, my parent's miniature australian shepherd, if she attempts to cross the threshold, Teddy will lunge growling and pinning the other dog and they have a scuffle until I pull them apart. I know that realistically this room is probably the only place in the whole house Teddy feels is her territory. But this behavior is disturbing. What I want to know is if it's realistic to ever expect to be able to counter condition/desensitize Teddy to the other dog entering her room? She has started showing some resource guarding about her own food towards the other dog and we had been working with the CC and it seemed tensions were decreasing in the household in general but this room is whole different matter! And she really doesn't have a threshold, other than the threshold being the threshold. Sigh. We are getting a baby gate to prevent any possible incidents. But I've read a lot things that say a dog should have a place it can feel safe. Should I try and train her to accept the other dog in the room or should I just prevent the other dog from entering and leave it at that?

I am feeling more than little overwhelmed as Teddy since about 4.5 months has been a lot more fear/aggressive than my first GSD. I have reading and reading. I did have a little training and puppy classes set up before COVID19 got all that cancelled.
 

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Do they walk/play/socialize together outside of the room?
Have you always made it a point of every member of the household being able to take away and give back his food dish?
6.5 months? Nip this in the bud now.
 

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Do they walk/play/socialize together outside of the room?
This is a valid question.


Have you always made it a point of every member of the household being able to take away and give back his food dish?

6.5 months? Nip this in the bud now.
But you've lost me here! Why would anyone do that? How would playing with a dog's food teach them anything at all about reactivity in general, or reactivity toward the other dog where their room is concerned specifically?

OP, if you want the other dog to be able to come in the room just tell your dog that it's okay, and don't allow her bad behavior toward the other dog. It may take a bit, but she'll catch on and calm down.

Taking her food away would have no bearing at all! Just show her what is and is not acceptable and be consistent!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
This is a valid question.



But you've lost me here! Why would anyone do that? How would playing with a dog's food teach them anything at all about reactivity in general, or reactivity toward the other dog where their room is concerned specifically?

OP, if you want the other dog to be able to come in the room just tell your dog that it's okay, and don't allow her bad behavior toward the other dog. It may take a bit, but she'll catch on and calm down.

Taking her food away would have no bearing at all! Just show her what is and is not acceptable and be consistent!
As far as taking her food away, no not particularly, but if I need to move her food or pick it up, I will. Also a resident 2 year old has been feeding Teddy by hand off and on for a while, taking the food out of Teddy's bowl and then giving it to Teddy, while closely supervised. Teddy doesn't seem to care.

They do not socialize or play together, the other dog does not want to play. She wants to be left alone. She kind of played with Teddy a little when Teddy was smaller. But now Teddy is bigger she no longer engages and growls at Teddy for harassing her. Which is discouraged by us, but no help. Playing isn't going to happen. Once I can get Teddy walking properly maybe we could walk them together in the driveway, but that's it. Even if I get Teddy to be able to tolerate walking at the park. Lizzy will never tolerate it, she's very fearful, doesn't like the outside world, and older, and has epilepsy. Trying to expose her to things she doesn't like can trigger a seizure which Lizzy cannot afford as her condition is deteriorating.

I am going to be getting professional help with training Teddy at the beginning of June.

How would you stop her bad behavior? Leash her? Muzzle her? Just hold her back. Once I start with the trainer perhaps I can find an acceptable and effective correction, but I haven't yet.
 

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This is a valid question.



But you've lost me here! Why would anyone do that? How would playing with a dog's food teach them anything at all about reactivity in general, or reactivity toward the other dog where their room is concerned specifically?

OP, if you want the other dog to be able to come in the room just tell your dog that it's okay, and don't allow her bad behavior toward the other dog. It may take a bit, but she'll catch on and calm down.

Taking her food away would have no bearing at all! Just show her what is and is not acceptable and be consistent!
Read her post again:
"She has started showing some resource guarding about her own food"

Toward a person or another dog, no matter, it's always a good idea to confirm who controls the food; you. Each member of the family should be able to remove food, toys etc for the eventual case when something is being eaten or guarded that NEEDS to be removed.

And if her dog is starting to guard food against a dog, it may be only a matter of time before it starts to guard food from you or that toddler she mentions. Never allow food guarding, my opinion.
 

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Read her post again:
"She has started showing some resource guarding about her own food"

Toward a person or another dog, no matter, it's always a good idea to confirm who controls the food; you. Each member of the family should be able to remove food, toys etc for the eventual case when something is being eaten or guarded that NEEDS to be removed.

And if her dog is starting to guard food against a dog, it may be only a matter of time before it starts to guard food from you or that toddler she mentions. Never allow food guarding, my opinion.
We can agree to disagree, but I thought the OP said they'd pretty much resolved the food guarding issue.

At any rate, while I agree resource guarding is an undesirable behavior that shouldn't be left unresolved. From what I've seen it usually boils down to a trust issue, so I like to resolve indirectly by addressing that!

And given the dynamic between these two dogs, a gate is probably the best solution, while they work on lessening the tension where the room is involved. JMHO, for what it's worth...
 
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