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5 Health Care Tips For Your German Shepherd

A German Shepherd is typically a healthy breed of dog with an average lifespan of 12 to 16 years. A well-bred German Shepard will usually not have any serious health problems; however, all German Shepherds are susceptible to a few health conditions. Health conditions may include; canine hip dysplasia, Von Willebrand’s Disease and/or skin allergies. What follows are a few health care tips for your German Shepherd for optimum health.



Balanced Diet

One of the most important things you can do for the health of your German Shepherd is feeding him a healthy, well-balanced diet. German Shepherds are very active, so they require plenty of protein in their diet. Fresh meats such as chicken, beef, and turkey are excellent sources of protein; however, they also need a balance of vegetables, eggs, and rice included in the diet. It is best to avoid wheat, corn or rice, as these foods may be difficult on his digestive system. The amount of food your dog eats depends on his activity level, but the average is about three total cups of food per day, and any uneaten food should be removed after about thirty minutes. Avoid feeding your German Shepherd any foods that contain additives as they are difficult to digest and will only produce unhealthy calories.

Daily Exercise

German Shepherds require regular exercise to prevent boredom as well as to help reduce symptoms of arthritis or hip dysplasia. You should take your German Shepherd for daily walks and let him outside play at least twice each day. If you notice he is having difficulties walking or moving, it is important to take him in for an examination to make sure he is not experiencing hip dysplasia. Over time, without the proper treatment, hip dysplasia can lead to muscle waste, especially in the leg of the affected hip.

General Health Checks

It is important to routinely spend a few minutes checking the German Shepherd for any signs of a potentially dangerous health problem. Some of the signs you should look for in his overall general health include lack of coordination, increased aggression, loss of appetite, loss of water consumption, weight change, bloated abdomen, gagging, coughing and change in muscle tone. The feet should be checked daily for abrasions, damaged pads, and nail problems and check the skin daily for hair loss, red spots, parasites, and sores.

Eyes, Ears, and Nose


The eyes, ears, and nose of your German Shepherd should be checked on a daily basis, and if you notice anything unusual, it is important to have him examined by the vet.

Eyes should be checked for discolored whites, discharge, squinting, cloudiness or pupils that are unequal or unresponsive.
The ears should be checked for redness, excessive scratching, and bad odor.
The nose should not have any discharge, change in color or crusted top.

Oral Hygiene


Good oral hygiene is also important to prevent other serious health problems in your dog.Check the mouth for red, swollen or bleeding gums, bad breath, sores on the tongue and loose or dirty teeth. Brush his teeth regularly and have them checked by a veterinarian about every six months. It is also beneficial to talk to the vet for recommendations on treats that will also help to keep his teeth and gums clean and healthy.

One of the most important things you can do for the health of your German Shepherd is to make sure he is up to date on all of his shots and vaccinations. Schedule yearly health checks with the veterinarian and if you notice any changes in your dog’s behavior or activity take him in for a checkup as soon as possible.


Via:animalbilss
 

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5 Health Care Tips For Your German Shepherd

A German Shepherd is typically a healthy breed of dog with an average lifespan of 12 to 16 years. A well-bred German Shepard will usually not have any serious health problems; however, all German Shepherds are susceptible to a few health conditions. Health conditions may include; canine hip dysplasia, Von Willebrand’s Disease and/or skin allergies. What follows are a few health care tips for your German Shepherd for optimum health.



Balanced Diet

One of the most important things you can do for the health of your German Shepherd is feeding him a healthy, well-balanced diet. German Shepherds are very active, so they require plenty of protein in their diet. Fresh meats such as chicken, beef, and turkey are excellent sources of protein; however, they also need a balance of vegetables, eggs, and rice included in the diet. It is best to avoid wheat, corn or rice, as these foods may be difficult on his digestive system. The amount of food your dog eats depends on his activity level, but the average is about three total cups of food per day, and any uneaten food should be removed after about thirty minutes. Avoid feeding your German Shepherd any foods that contain additives as they are difficult to digest and will only produce unhealthy calories.

Daily Exercise

German Shepherds require regular exercise to prevent boredom as well as to help reduce symptoms of arthritis or hip dysplasia. You should take your German Shepherd for daily walks and let him outside play at least twice each day. If you notice he is having difficulties walking or moving, it is important to take him in for an examination to make sure he is not experiencing hip dysplasia. Over time, without the proper treatment, hip dysplasia can lead to muscle waste, especially in the leg of the affected hip.

General Health Checks

It is important to routinely spend a few minutes checking the German Shepherd for any signs of a potentially dangerous health problem. Some of the signs you should look for in his overall general health include lack of coordination, increased aggression, loss of appetite, loss of water consumption, weight change, bloated abdomen, gagging, coughing and change in muscle tone. The feet should be checked daily for abrasions, damaged pads, and nail problems and check the skin daily for hair loss, red spots, parasites, and sores.

Eyes, Ears, and Nose


The eyes, ears, and nose of your German Shepherd should be checked on a daily basis, and if you notice anything unusual, it is important to have him examined by the vet.

Eyes should be checked for discolored whites, discharge, squinting, cloudiness or pupils that are unequal or unresponsive.
The ears should be checked for redness, excessive scratching, and bad odor.
The nose should not have any discharge, change in color or crusted top.

Oral Hygiene


Good oral hygiene is also important to prevent other serious health problems in your dog.Check the mouth for red, swollen or bleeding gums, bad breath, sores on the tongue and loose or dirty teeth. Brush his teeth regularly and have them checked by a veterinarian about every six months. It is also beneficial to talk to the vet for recommendations on treats that will also help to keep his teeth and gums clean and healthy.

One of the most important things you can do for the health of your German Shepherd is to make sure he is up to date on all of his shots and vaccinations. Schedule yearly health checks with the veterinarian and if you notice any changes in your dog’s behavior or activity take him in for a checkup as soon as possible.


Via:animalbilss
Strange and incomplete advice.
 

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yeah, NO !

seems like all of these little GSD tidbits are off .

contradictory statement under balanced diet "they also need a balance of vegetables, eggs, and rice included in the diet."

and continues with "It is best to avoid wheat, corn or rice as these foods can be difficult on his digestive system"

which is it?

sorry , ALL German Shepherds are NOT susceptible to Von Willebrand's disease . (blood clotting factor )

there may be some old-timers around on the forum who may recall that testing for von Willebrand's was part of the responsible breeder requirement , just as testing for DM is now.

Rarely done now .

The big activity for this test started with early, close up (first and second generation) Canto Wienerau progeny.

Canto only lived till 4 years of age . There were questions about his health . It is thought that Canto was the origin of
this disorder.
 

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Average lifespan is 12 to 16 years?

Yeah, it USED to be! Recently, I heard someone say they considered any years after 10 to be 'a gift'! :rolleyes2:

One of the first things they teach you when you're studying genetics is that too much inbreeding causes loss of longevity and overall hardiness.

Methinks that's NOT a co-incidence!

Oh, and additives contain 'unhealthy calories'?? What the heck?? I think of additives as being chemicals added to the food, to improve the appearance and texture, such as dyes and fillers! They actually add cellulose to the kibble fed to overweight animals, and they used to add clay to kibble to make the nuggets stay together. Both of these additives have zero calories, and neither do dyes. Maybe they meant "empty calories"??
 

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We had to put our last shepherd down at 12 years of age he was on a slow decline once he turned 9 or ten with arthritis. One of Max's grandpas recently passed at 16 it was the breeders Heart dog - it was the first time I heard of a gsd living till 16- I'm sure they are out there though but not the norm.
 

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I owned one that lived to 16 - fit as a fiddle -- we forgot her age.
Died in her sleep .

Ruth Yeulet had one that lived to 17 -- weeks before she was still following the
all-terrain doing her farm duties . Rallos Farmenblick was the sire -- the dam was a Carmspack female who also had
a long and healthy life .

My average is 13 to 14 years.

"Kato" owned by Linda Shaw and featured in her </title> <link rel="profile" href="http://gmpg.org/xfn/11"> <link rel="pingback" href="http://shawlein.com/wordpress/xmlrpc.php"> <title>SHAWLEIN.COM was born in 2003 - past away just a few months ago 2017 .
He looked and moved and acted like a vibrant 6 year old .

Got a notice that one of my dogs passed away -- age 15. She sent me a picture of the dog from 6 months ago when she got the all clear for health from the vet .
Looked like an active 10 year old . She joined her owner on a long daily walk down and around a quarry being naturalized again. Rain or shine .
She was from the very last litter that "Joker" had Binga Kuhnhof X Tarbes Knufken Carmspack Joker

all of them were good old working lines capable of getting old and working
 

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all of them were good old working lines capable of getting old and working.
Yeah, well, I wasn't thinking working lines when I posted that! I just didn't want to say it. :rolleyes:

Not true for all of them, though. My show line girl is still very healthy and active at age 10 (but she's a total outcross genetically!)
 

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all of them were good old working lines capable of getting old and working.
Yeah, well, I wasn't thinking working lines when I posted that! I just didn't want to say it.


Not true for all of them, though. My show line girl is still very healthy and active at age 10 (but she's a total outcross genetically!)
Eww lol!

You were not thinking of working lines when they said - German shepherds - it is the first on here lol!

A German shepherd from any lines with good genetics has an increased opportunity to live longer. I saw a wgsl at a show - he wAs 10 years old and looked like he was two. Keeping their weight down and a healthy diet, of course good genetics helps so much. My good old showlines get me even working and are incredibly healthy!!!
 

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Average lifespan is 12 to 16 years?

Yeah, it USED to be! Recently, I heard someone say they considered any years after 10 to be 'a gift'! :rolleyes2:

One of the first things they teach you when you're studying genetics is that too much inbreeding causes loss of longevity and overall hardiness.

Methinks that's NOT a co-incidence!

Oh, and additives contain 'unhealthy calories'?? What the heck?? I think of additives as being chemicals added to the food, to improve the appearance and texture, such as dyes and fillers! They actually add cellulose to the kibble fed to overweight animals, and they used to add clay to kibble to make the nuggets stay together. Both of these additives have zero calories, and neither do dyes. Maybe they meant "empty calories"??
I have had many GSD over 45 years and all have lived between 12/14 years. 'Kibble' is a quick cheap excuse to keep a gsd fit. In all my dogs raw meat and/or grain free food provides Lifelong freedom from yeast problems (ear and teeth). Kibble has and always been a product to fill the dogs stomach to provide freedom from hunger and none provide the natural protein of their canine needs. Vegetables are also overlooked in protein and digestion. Lets play a game and see how long a human would live entirely fed on 'kibble'. Kibble is a product from the rich pet food manufacturers who dont care in the least about real time animal food
 
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