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I just got her about a week ago, and she's mostly really obedient. If you saw her 95% of the time, the other 5% would shock you. she eats healthy, 3 times a day. i make sure to walk and train her daily (which she is doing good at). I take her out places for social interaction with other dogs/ people, which she usually likes unless theres a bigger dog than her, which makes her uncomfortable, so i try to keep it around her size (which my other two dogs are).

I just don't understand the aggression. at first it was just when she was eating or playing with a toy, she would growl, snap and bite (which she is becoming more comfortable with me around during these situations). She still shows aggression towards my family, and occasionally aggression towards me. It is seemingly random, and thats what scares me. I just don't know what to do, but I need to come up with a solution quick. I already feel like me and her have ta bond after a week, and i would really like to help her and train her. My mom on the other hand is running out of patience. would anyone know any common triggers? anything i can do to calm her down but still remain dominant in these situations?
 

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Read about resource guarding. Tons of resources here and on-line. Very common in dogs. Read and see if this explains to you what she is doing.
Second, start having little training sessions that include a "watch me" command (lots of resources here and online) and lots of fun. You want her to begin to trust you and turn to you for direction. Teaching her that focusing on you is fun and rewarding is the goal. Then you begin to "proof" that first around other small dogs, then medium dogs and finally larger dogs but back off far enough that she is able to focus on you. You don't want to do this at a dog park but just in an area with a few other dogs that are on leash somewhere.
 

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Definitely research resource guarding.I would feed her in her crate or at least in an isolated room where she feels secure and can be alone for the time being.It's very possible that the food guarding will fade away as she gets acclimated to her new home.If not,it's easy to manage.
Play two ball with her and teach her to trade one toy for another.Don't use her absolute favorite toy when starting this!Make it a fun game for her.
If you try to "dominate" her it only makes her feel like she has to defend herself.She'll respond best to calm confidence.Her behavior right now is her feeling insecure,not aggression.She sounds like a really nice puppy:)
 

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I just got her about a week ago, and she's mostly really obedient. If you saw her 95% of the time, the other 5% would shock you. she eats healthy, 3 times a day. i make sure to walk and train her daily (which she is doing good at). I take her out places for social interaction with other dogs/ people, which she usually likes unless theres a bigger dog than her, which makes her uncomfortable, so i try to keep it around her size (which my other two dogs are).

I just don't understand the aggression. at first it was just when she was eating or playing with a toy, she would growl, snap and bite (which she is becoming more comfortable with me around during these situations). She still shows aggression towards my family, and occasionally aggression towards me. It is seemingly random, and thats what scares me. I just don't know what to do, but I need to come up with a solution quick. I already feel like me and her have ta bond after a week, and i would really like to help her and train her. My mom on the other hand is running out of patience. would anyone know any common triggers? anything i can do to calm her down but still remain dominant in these situations?
So you have a 16 week old puppy that you just got? Where did you get her from? Was it someone getting rid of her because she was biting? My guess is that. And that she was never taught to not do this! I doubt the other 5% of the time would shock anyone here. German Shepherd puppies are called landsharks for a reason. ;)

Second, if you give her food, it is hers. I don't know what you mean by "she is becoming more comfortable with me around during these situations". Are you messing with her food while she's eating? Did the person who had her prior mess with her food? Put her in a crate, put her food in the crate, and leave her alone to eat. The only other thing you might do is drop really great things in there like cheese, meats, etc to teach her that your approach means good things. You are going to need that trust for the day you need to yank something bad out of her mouth!

Forget that whole "dominant" theory stuff. This is a puppy. Teach her to trust you! As far as toys, redirect her with other toys. Is she really being aggressive? Or is she being very vocal and playing rough? The fact that it's random tells me she's probably just playing and getting to rough. Engage her, look up "bite inhibition" threads (lots of them on here!), and look up "resource guarding" as mentioned previously. Just make sure YOU are not creating the resource guarding!
 

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I adopted Natty Boh, my mix, from a shelter. He was the same age as your pup, when I got him. 'Boh' also had resource guarding issues. Read up all you can on that. In the meantime, here is what Boh has taught me....

1. Never take anything away from a resource guarder. Always trade.

The resource guarder fears you are going to take his stuff. If you actually take his toy, food, etc. away, you are proving him right. You ARE taking his things. Messing with his food and his toys reinforces his need to resource guard. Don't make it worse.

2. Teach 'drop it!' and 'leave it' and always have something higher value in your hand.

By having him drop it, he is relinquishing his 'stuff'. You aren't taking it. My dog is very food motivated. So - if he has a piece of paper in his mouth, which is higher value? Watch how fast he drops that paper or stick.

3. Up obedience and hand feed.

These things did wonders with my dog. My hand only gave good things. They never took things away.

Natty Boh is almost 4 years old now. He respects me, because I respect him. Mutual respect is everything. He has learned that I am not going to mess with his food. I tell him sit and touch (his nose to my hand). I put his food down and walk away. I can take anything out of his mouth. He won't bite me, or even growl. He will not allow my adult children to do the same. Why? They never respected his thresholds or gained his trust. That is why I tell them to trade him.

Jax08 could be right that your pups' previous owners messed with her food. I don't think that is the case with Natty Boh. I think he is a neurotic mess who is just wired that way. It is old school to put your hands in your dogs' food, thinking you are teaching them to not resource guard. Often, the dog is fine with that and the owner thinks they did something right. The truth is - that particular dog was never and would never be a resource guarder. I could straddle my other dog, Shelby while she's eating. I could take her food away. I could stick my entire head in her bowl. She just doesn't care. Different dog. But - to that to a resource guarder and you are going to have serious problems. Just work with your girl every day. Build that trust.
 

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My mom on the other hand is running out of patience. would anyone know any common triggers? anything i can do to calm her down but still remain dominant in these situations?
Well ... as to that question the answer to that would be "Yes" and here:

Fearful, Anxious or Flat Crazy "The Place CommanD - Boxer Forum : Boxer Breed Dog Forums

Every successful dog/puppy rehab process, starts with "Place," it trains "Calmness" into the dog and teaches them to "Chill."

This "puppy" should be Crate Trained and she should eat only in her Crate. She should be taught "The Place Command" and indoors she should be in her Crate or in Place only. No up on yor bed or up on the furniture period. It's need not be that way "Forever" but 30 to 90 days is a good time line. Doing that alone "may" address the "resource guarding??" More on that in a bit.

Frankly I don't understand why people "screw" around with other dogs?? I don't need the hassle of "fixing" issues caused by other peoples dogs myself. If one of these random "I thought my dog was friendly" encounters goes sideways?? You could very well have a whole new set of issues on your hand?? And the puppy could very well start to take it out on your other dogs??

I just say "NO" to unknown dogs myself and teach my dogs to "Ignore" other dogs ... works out fine. :)

In the "New Dog a Challenge" thread which I will link to see ..."Who Pets, my Puppy or Dog," "Why Dog Parks are a bad Idea" (I don't know if your going) but lots of insight and "Three Dogs Who Should Not Be At a DOg Park." Again I don't know if your going but your dog might be one of the three???

So ... that said all the things I've mentioned are here:
http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/7837361-post12.html

Those things alone "my" address the "resource guarding" issues indirectly, don't know, they should be done in anycase. All the above would be considered as Flanking" the dog, address the "issue" indirectly. :)

For a more "Direct Approach" to the "Resource Guarding" issues see these:


So yeah .. it's a lot but it's all simple basic stuff and you can do it,
it's all about teaching your dog to make better "Choices.

Welcome aboard and as always ask questions.
 

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I used 'Mind Games' with Natty Boh. I didn't use every step. I did use 'Patience' - the 30 minute down. It was awesome. Here is the link. Mind Games (version 1.0) by M. Shirley Chong

Another thing I noticed about Natty Boh reg. resource guarding. Some dogs resource guard from other dogs. Some resource guard from people. I suppose some dog resource guard from both. Natty Boh does not resource guard from other dogs - just people.
 

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My dog was the same at this age and I am glad to say we trained her completely out of it very quickly. I would do a couple of things. DO a lot of "trading". Give her something she likes (a bully stick works well, due to its strong smell, and the long shape makes it less likely she'll nip your hand). Let her have it for a bit, then "trade" it to her for another one or something even better. Do this often. The second thing we did a lot if adding more food of a better quality (chopped meat or cheese) while she is already eating. This is to help her learn that hands in her bowl are a good thing, bringing more things and not trying to take them away. Nip it in the bud. Do not feed her alone or in her crate or in another room, as this will give you no opportunity to work with this. With a small pup like this you are best to tackle the problem head on and not allow this problem behaviour to grow. Also be very sure that your dog is being fed enough and is not guarding out of necessity. Show no fear of your pup and maintain a calm relaxed manner when training her.
Good Luck!
 
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