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Did you test thoroughly for fungal infections? Valley Fever? My first dog got Valley Fever and titers can be low or inconclusive at first. I treated with compounded anti-fungals, but too late. He had a high fever and lack of appetite and general poor health with some coughing. Then seizures. Sadly, because the vets on the East Coast weren't experienced, he later died of seizure complications when the fungus went to the brain.

Attacking a dog that is experiencing a seizure isn't at all uncommon even for a nice, otherwise non-aggressive dog. We like to think dogs are sweet things who protect the ill and old, but that's not the case... dogs and their canid cousins wolves tend to actually kill off or drive away ill and old animals, without human interference.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Did you test thoroughly for fungal infections? Valley Fever? My first dog got Valley Fever and titers can be low or inconclusive at first. I treated with compounded anti-fungals, but too late. He had a high fever and lack of appetite and general poor health with some coughing. Then seizures. Sadly, because the vets on the East Coast weren't experienced, he later died of seizure complications when the fungus went to the brain.

Attacking a dog that is experiencing a seizure isn't at all uncommon even for a nice, otherwise non-aggressive dog. We like to think dogs are sweet things who protect the ill and old, but that's not the case... dogs and their canid cousins wolves tend to actually kill off or drive away ill and old animals, without human interference.
Thankyou for the information, very sorry about your loss, I will have them follow-up on possible fungal infection and valley fever.
 

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What are the signs of blastomycosis?
The blastomycosisfungus seems to target certain body systems, although it may spread throughout the entire body. Fever, depression, weight loss, and loss of appetite are common clinical signs. Draining skin lesions are seen in many cases. Some degree of respiratory distress is present in advanced cases. Infection of the eyes may cause sudden blindness. Lameness, orchitis (testicular inflammation), seizures, coughing, enlarged lymph nodes, and a variety of other signs may occur with blastomycosis.
 

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Fungal infections are weird- they can present in unusual ways, so I second doing a panel for any possible fungal infection- it's usually a titer, I believe. But it can "hide" so check with the vet.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Also ask about this:
What are the signs of blastomycosis?
The blastomycosisfungus seems to target certain body systems, although it may spread throughout the entire body. Fever, depression, weight loss, and loss of appetite are common clinical signs. Draining skin lesions are seen in many cases. Some degree of respiratory distress is present in advanced cases. Infection of the eyes may cause sudden blindness. Lameness, orchitis (testicular inflammation), seizures, coughing, enlarged lymph nodes, and a variety of other signs may occur with blastomycosis.
Thank you I will ask today we have at our appointment because the fever is still at 105.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Fungal infections are weird- they can present in unusual ways, so I second doing a panel for any possible fungal infection- it's usually a titer, I believe. But it can "hide" so check with the vet.
Ok, thank you, I will ask today because the fever is not going down.
 

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Did you test thoroughly for fungal infections? Valley Fever? My first dog got Valley Fever and titers can be low or inconclusive at first. I treated with compounded anti-fungals, but too late. He had a high fever and lack of appetite and general poor health with some coughing. Then seizures. Sadly, because the vets on the East Coast weren't experienced, he later died of seizure complications when the fungus went to the brain.
I was also thinking it could be a fungal infection. When Sage was so ill from discospondylitis, antibiotics had no effect. With all the testing we could never determine if it was bacterial or fungal. By the time we could have tried anti-fungals, it was too late for her too. High fever and vestibular disease, which my vet felt was due to a fungal infection that had gone to her brain.
 

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The low-platelet count is the clue!!!!

PLEASE ask the vet to send out a blood to the lab to test for babesia (a rare tick disease that isn't part of the "regular" tick disease test). It is treated with a malaria medication that is formulated by a compounding pharmacy. Ever babesia case we've seen in our rescue has started with a low platelet or RBC count -- some dogs needed transfusions due to how low they dropped. That clue really must be followed up!

Some who are familiar with babesia can spot it under a microscope sometimes -- it's a tiny parasite INSIDE the blood cells. If that's what it is, it will kill the dog if untreated. Random natural remedies right now may hasten your dog's death, if this is what it is.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Also ask about this:
What are the signs of blastomycosis?
The blastomycosisfungus seems to target certain body systems, although it may spread throughout the entire body. Fever, depression, weight loss, and loss of appetite are common clinical signs. Draining skin lesions are seen in many cases. Some degree of respiratory distress is present in advanced cases. Infection of the eyes may cause sudden blindness. Lameness, orchitis (testicular inflammation), seizures, coughing, enlarged lymph nodes, and a variety of other signs may occur with blastomycosis.
I will ask
The low-platelet count is the clue!!!!

PLEASE ask the vet to send out a blood to the lab to test for babesia (a rare tick disease that isn't part of the "regular" tick disease test). It is treated with a malaria medication that is formulated by a compounding pharmacy. Ever babesia case we've seen in our rescue has started with a low platelet or RBC count -- some dogs needed transfusions due to how low they dropped. That clue really must be followed up!

Some who are familiar with babesia can spot it under a microscope sometimes -- it's a tiny parasite INSIDE the blood cells. If that's what it is, it will kill the dog if untreated. Random natural remedies right now may hasten your dog's death, if this is what it is.
They have sent all the blood samples to 2 laboratories and the in house lab and they have no clue what it is they said it is not a tick born illness. Currently he is running high fever and fluid in lungs. This is now over 3 weeks and no improvement at all. We have another appointment today with another specialist. Thank you
 

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I hope your pup recovers. Regarding the attack -- I suspect this might have been triggered by the Yorkie's odd behavior if he was having a stroke - perhaps coupled with the pup's health problems.

Not exactly concrete help - but wishing you well.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
I hope your pup recovers. Regarding the attack -- I suspect this might have been triggered by the Yorkie's odd behavior if he was having a stroke - perhaps coupled with the pup's health problems.

Not exactly concrete help - but wishing you well.
Thankyou
 

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That is probably unrelated. In my former village two Rotties killed their owner when he had a stroke.
I hope your dog recovers soon. This is scary.
 

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That is probably unrelated. In my former village two Rotties killed their owner when he had a stroke.
I hope your dog recovers soon. This is scary.
We think she had the stroke after being attacked. It seems as if this has created aggression in him.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
I hope your pup recovers. Regarding the attack -- I suspect this might have been triggered by the Yorkie's odd behavior if he was having a stroke - perhaps coupled with the pup's health problems.

Not exactly concrete help - but wishing you well.
We think the attack caused the stroke of the Yorkie the fever of the gs seems to really be affecting the mental state of him.
 

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We think she had the stroke after being attacked. It seems as if this has created aggression in him.
Aggression can be a symptom of a dog that is not feeling well or is in pain. It is normal. I hope that they find what the problem is with your dog and that they can get him on the road to recovery.
 
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I will ask
They have sent all the blood samples to 2 laboratories and the in house lab and they have no clue what it is they said it is not a tick born illness. Currently he is running high fever and fluid in lungs. This is now over 3 weeks and no improvement at all. We have another appointment today with another specialist. Thank you
Babesia wouldn't be something anyone would catch unless they are running a very specific test for it alone -- it has to be specially ordered (and many labs don't even offer it -- I think our sample had to be sent to a vet school lab, not the standard commercial one). It's just not something that's part of a the general search for answers unless a vet happens to think of it.

I believe Valley Fever may also require sending out for a specialty test that only looks for it in particular.

Unfortunately, these shot-in-the-dark diagnostics be keyed to the particular thing they're looking for, so it can start to get expensive, as you won't pick them up with "general" blood work or testing.

Can your vet also call the one in Topanga that had the dog with the rare infection to find out what it was, and whether they sent off blood/tissue for pathology?

Good luck!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Babesia wouldn't be something anyone would catch unless they are running a very specific test for it alone -- it has to be specially ordered (and many labs don't even offer it -- I think our sample had to be sent to a vet school lab, not the standard commercial one). It's just not something that's part of a the general search for answers unless a vet happens to think of it.

I believe Valley Fever may also require sending out for a specialty test that only looks for it in particular.

Unfortunately, these shot-in-the-dark diagnostics be keyed to the particular thing they're looking for, so it can start to get expensive, as you won't pick them up with "general" blood work or testing.

Can your vet also call the one in Topanga that had the dog with the rare infection to find out what it was, and whether they sent off blood/tissue for pathology?

Good luck!!!
We have taken him to another specialist today to run the tites test for valley fever.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Got confirmation no valley fever. The fever is still at 104 and 105 and not eating.
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