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So we made a decision to rehome him to a friend with another gsd and gsd experience, he has no kids, and doesnt work so has a ton of time to spend with ruger and he will has a gsd buddy!!! Hes been there since yesterday afternoon and is liking it there til it's time to go to bed and he is missing home so he whines but in time he will be ok. This was a much easier decision then to euthanize him as he really is a good boy except with my daughter. This was a dog I had an extreme bond with so it was a very hard decision that I shouldve made when he first showed aggression with her but she cried to keep him and it's just unfortunate that it took the bite to see he really needed a new home despite our love for him. Thanks to all for your advice ?
Thanks for updating! I just wanted to compliment you on following through and being open to advice and other's experiences. Going to a breed knowledgeable kid free owner who understands Ruger is changeable and has shown unpredictability, complete with an injurious bite, was probably the only possible alternate outcome here. I hope all that is the case with the rehoming. I wish him and Ruger all of the luck and successes.
 

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So happy for this update. I am glad the OP gave him a chance to continue to enjoy life and give joy to his new owner.
 

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I'm so glad you found a solution that may work for all. It's a terrible spot to be in. Wishing all of you the best.
 

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I was just wondering— did you have Ruger checked by a vet? He’s probably healthy, but it’s worth checking, just in case he is in some sort of pain or has another medical issue that is affecting his behavior. When I was a kid, our neighbor had a GSD that suddenly became aggressive, and it turned out he had a brain tumor. He suddenly became aggressive towards everyone, though, and had never been like that before, so it was obvious something was wrong with him.

Also, while I realize that whatever triggered him to bite your daughter probably doesn’t matter now, and we’ll likely never know what it was, I was reminded of a mountain lion I used to know when I worked in wildlife rescue. I volunteered at a wildlife hospital with an area where animals who could not be released due to permanent injuries were available for the public to view. Our mountain lion had come from an abusive situation and could not be released to the wild due to having been raised by humans and thus being too comfortable and unafraid of humans, plus not really knowing how to survive in the wild. She had been at the museum for years by the time I knew her, and was very used to seeing all kinds of people watching her in her enclosure without issue, but went crazy when the UPS guy walked by. He wore a hat, had a beard, and wore a uniform. She had shown some mild aggression (like staring) towards men in hats before, so we suspect that her abuser had a beard, wore a hat, and may have worn a uniform. This just made me wonder if your daughter had an outfit or hairstyle that day that reminded your dog of a previous owner that he didn’t like. Probably doesn’t matter now, but something to consider with any future people he may encounter.
 

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So we made a decision to rehome him to a friend with another gsd and gsd experience, he has no kids, and doesnt work so has a ton of time to spend with ruger and he will has a gsd buddy!!! Hes been there since yesterday afternoon and is liking it there til it's time to go to bed and he is missing home so he whines but in time he will be ok. This was a much easier decision then to euthanize him as he really is a good boy except with my daughter. This was a dog I had an extreme bond with so it was a very hard decision that I shouldve made when he first showed aggression with her but she cried to keep him and it's just unfortunate that it took the bite to see he really needed a new home despite our love for him. Thanks to all for your advice ?
Thank you for letting us know. We know it was a very difficult decision and you did what was best for the dog. In doing that, you also protected your daughter. Ruger will love having another dog to play with, too.

If you decide to replace him with another dog, please get one with a known history. Strays are difficult because you can’t know their histories. Work with a trainer in your home until the dog is adjusted, or consider getting a puppy from a good breeder who breeds for sound temperament and train the dog to fit your family. If you get a rescue, go with a group that understands the breed and your situation. Not all rescue groups are good ones. If you need help finding a dog, ask. We can walk you through the process.
 

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After such a difficult experience, you deserve the good luck of knowing someone both in a position to take on this dog, and equipped to do so. Best of luck to all involved, and may you and your family find new love to fill the hole in your hearts, when the time comes.
 

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In November of 2017 we adopted a rescue that had been a stray. We brought him home he was very loving until the 10th day, my daughter who was 13 at the time came out of the bathroom to the livingroom where the dog was sitting with me, we had just brought him home a new toy when she came out she said you got a new toy and reached for it which had not been a big deal before but this time he lunged and barked, I thought it was weird but questioned if he was trying to play but when she reached to pet him he snapped at her so I grab his collar pulling him down the hall to his kennel in my bedroom, a few hrs later I brought him back out and held his collar while he sat at my feet as she sat further down the couch and he was fine until she went to the kitchen and as she came back he tried to aggressively lunge at her, I tightened my grip in his collar as he was still acting vicious while i dragged him to his kennel. I spoke to a few trainers who said he was resource guarding me and she needed to feed him, give him treats, toys, etc so she would become his resource, we did that and took him to some training classes where she was the one working with him. I discovered he would only be aggressive with her if she walked into the room while I was sitting or laying down. After her being the one to do everything for him he got to the point he would seek her out in her room to snuggle and things were good until the last few days he would growl and or put his head down and stare when she even opened her bedroom door but tonight he actually bit her breaking skin down to muscle, when I grabbed him and she ran to get my husband from the shop he was still viciously growling and trying to bite. He is only like this with her and only if someone else is home (if it's just those 2 home hes perfect with her), and shes not a small child shes 5'10 150lbs but he is currently 98lbs. I'm not going to keep him but now wonder if he is safe to go to a new home? I dont get why he doesnt like only her and why sometimes he will seek her out for affection. Any thoughts?
I had the same exact thing with a GSD that I got at 8 weeks old from a very reputable breeder. He always had a lot of drive and no impulse control. He was a lot of dog from the beginning but I kept working through it bc the breeder claimed he would
Be a great family dog. He began growling at my daughter who was 13 when he was 1,5. This went on and off for almost 3 years. He lunged at her anytime she would walk in the room from upstairs. She never did anything to him. He bit my nephew after he was at our house for a week. He ran up to sniff him and when my nephew said hi he lunged up and bit him on the elbow. I was willing to deal with his aggression towards strangers and dogs on walks but he lunged at my daughter for the last time. I didn’t want a dog that was aggressive towards his own family. I was able to grab him but he looked crazy, growling barking and hackles raised. I had to put him down. No one has the right to judge anyone who is put in such a Terrible situation. The breeder has a responsibility to place the right dog with new owners. Everyone who saw his pedigree which was a very strong working line pedigree, couldn’t believe I was sold a dog like him. He had weak nerves and was not stable. I’m so sorry for what you are going through. I tried to re-home my dog too, but nobody wanted the liability.
 
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