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I adopted a male German Shepard and his name is bullet about a year ago and he is currently about 2 years old now. My brother ended up moving in with me and he owns a male German Shepard name Harvey. They both came from the same parents and are brothers about the same age but they cannot be within 10 feet of each other without trying to fight to the death. We don’t want to neuter them unless we absolutely have to. Is there any hope of them getting along?
 

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I wouldn't think so at 2. Typically male and female combo works best otherwise you may need to crate them separately forever.
 

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Personally, I'm not so quick to throw in the towel, so to speak! But answer this first. Are either of these boys okay with other male dogs anywhere outside your yard? If not, why not?
 

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What kind of introduction did they receive? You have to realize that the resident dog(s) are always going to be territorial unless you introduce them to a new dog gradually. My intact male will be 2 next month and I could not see him fighting with another intact male unless you just basically threw them together. I don't think neutering is the answer. Back up a bit and start again fresh with a slow intro. Crate them where they can see each other from a distance. Feed them at the same time. Let them smell each other's scent in the yard but don't put them together yet.
 

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Personally, I'm not so quick to throw in the towel, so to speak! But answer this first. Are either of these boys okay with other male dogs anywhere outside your yard? If not, why not?
I’m not sure about his but I’ve taken mine to the dog park and it’s been fine except when there is another male German Shepherd there
 

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What kind of introduction did they receive? You have to realize that the resident dog(s) are always going to be territorial unless you introduce them to a new dog gradually. My intact male will be 2 next month and I could not see him fighting with another intact male unless you just basically threw them together. I don't think neutering is the answer. Back up a bit and start again fresh with a slow intro. Crate them where they can see each other from a distance. Feed them at the same time. Let them smell each other's scent in the yard but don't put them together yet.
We tried with both of them on leashes and neither one really wanted to smell the other one they just wanted to fight, but I put the aggressive one in the crate and they both kinda chilled and smelled each other so we tried leashing them again and they went right back to being really aggressive
 

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I think Leerburg has some information about introducing a new dog to a resident dog that may be helpful for you to read. I would take things slow and crate and rotate the two dogs for now. If this is a long-term living arragnment, hiring a qualified GSD-experienced trainer would be wise. I have two male GSDs. Although things started out well, when the younger dog turned eight-months-old or so, they started having altercations. I keep them seperate at all times. If one dog is upstairs, the other is downstairs, or outside, ect.
 

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What kind of introduction did they receive? You have to realize that the resident dog(s) are always going to be territorial unless you introduce them to a new dog gradually. My intact male will be 2 next month and I could not see him fighting with another intact male unless you just basically threw them together. I don't think neutering is the answer. Back up a bit and start again fresh with a slow intro. Crate them where they can see each other from a distance. Feed them at the same time. Let them smell each other's scent in the yard but don't put them together yet.
We tried with both of them on leashes and neither one really wanted to smell the other one they just wanted to fight, but I put the aggressive one in the crate and they both kinda chilled and smelled each other so we tried leashing them again and they went right back to being really aggressive
 

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Have you tried taking the dogs out, on leash, for a good long hike? Keep it moving, no standing around each other. Usually when dogs are in motion, especially when there are fun things to see and smell, with a bit of a safe distance, there is no time to fight and they can get acclimated. Eventually, they may co-exist in the same house but can take time and several fun outings together. Introduction inside a house where one has lived and claimed as his is the hardest place to be doing the intro. Until they can get alone inside the house, they should be separated and not be allowed to practice the bad behavior as that will just set you back.
 

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I adopted a male German Shepard and his name is bullet about a year ago and he is currently about 2 years old now. My brother ended up moving in with me and he owns a male German Shepard name Harvey. They both came from the same parents and are brothers about the same age but they cannot be within 10 feet of each other without trying to fight to the death. We don’t want to neuter them unless we absolutely have to. Is there any hope of them getting along?
Have you tried taking the dogs out, on leash, for a good long hike? Keep it moving, no standing around each other. Usually when dogs are in motion, especially when there are fun things to see and smell, with a bit of a safe distance, there is no time to fight and they can get acclimated. Eventually, they may co-exist in the same house but can take time and several fun outings together. Introduction inside a house where one has lived and claimed as his is the hardest place to be doing the intro. Until they can get alone inside the house, they should be separated and not be allowed to practice the bad behavior as that will just set you back.
I’ve seen many dogs that will fight to the death when they are on leashes. I’d take them separately for a long long walk then meet with your brother his dog out in the country and let both dogs off leash. Neutral territory, no humans involved a little tired. When your dogs notice each other they’ll be sniffing everything around them and notice each other then realize Oh it’s only him. I’d never suggest this if one dog was bigger than the other or known for dog aggression. But if both dogs are temperamentally sound I’d risk it. It’s pretty rare for dogs to kill each other. I think they need to work out their relationship on their terms.
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I adopted a male German Shepard and his name is bullet about a year ago and he is currently about 2 years old now. My brother ended up moving in with me and he owns a male German Shepard name Harvey. They both came from the same parents and are brothers about the same age but they cannot be within 10 feet of each other without trying to fight to the death. We don’t want to neuter them unless we absolutely have to. Is there any hope of them getting along?
 

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We tried with both of them on leashes and neither one really wanted to smell the other one they just wanted to fight, but I put the aggressive one in the crate and they both kinda chilled and smelled each other so we tried leashing them again and they went right back to being really aggressive
That's moving too quickly. I wouldn't let them smell each other face to face yet and when you do get to that point muzzle both of them. I meant let one out into the yard to smell where the other one has been and vice versa. But keep them separate from each other at all times until the newness of a strange dog and smell as worn off. Feed them both in their individual crates at the same time where they can see each other from a distance and are enjoying a nice meal without worry.
 

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P.S. You have to go back to square one and start all over again just as if it's the first day since you moved things too quickly. Sorry, but it's a game of patience.
 

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I’ve seen many dogs that will fight to the death when they are on leashes. I’d take them separately for a long long walk then meet with your brother his dog out in the country and let both dogs off leash. Neutral territory, no humans involved a little tired. When your dogs notice each other they’ll be sniffing everything around them and notice each other then realize Oh it’s only him. I’d never suggest this if one dog was bigger than the other or known for dog aggression. But if both dogs are temperamentally sound I’d risk it. It’s pretty rare for dogs to kill each other. I think they need to work out their relationship on their terms.
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They are both around 2 years old but one of them is bigger than the other and more chill and the one that is a little smaller is more aggressive and super hyper. I have thought about trying this but am scared I won’t be able to break it up if they start fighting
 

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P.S. You have to go back to square one and start all over again just as if it's the first day since you moved things too quickly. Sorry, but it's a game of patience.
Thank you for the advice, I have never owned a German Shepard before this and have never had any of my animals aggressive towards each other so this is all new to me.
 

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I adopted a male German Shepard and his name is bullet about a year ago and he is currently about 2 years old now. My brother ended up moving in with me and he owns a male German Shepard name Harvey. They both came from the same parents and are brothers about the same age but they cannot be within 10 feet of each other without trying to fight to the death. We don’t want to neuter them unless we absolutely have to. Is there any hope of them getting along?
As someone who has volunteered with a GSD rescue for 7 years and fostered dozens and dozens, I'm curious about why you do not want to neuter these two dogs? It won't necessarily solve their issues with getting along with each other, but the number of unwanted dogs, strays, owner surrenders, puppy mill throwaways, and general over-supply of dogs has convinced me that neutering is vital unless you are going to show/train your dog with an intention to breed quality animals selected for temperament and health. If you are not looking to establish yourself as a show or working dog breeder, why refrain from neutering? I get the argument of later neutering for health concerns, but these two dogs are certainly old enough at this point to be neutered safely. Please don't let these two dogs contribute to the abundance of unwanted, uncared for animals which fill rescues daily. As far as having them get along living together, get a professional involved asap and see if it will make a difference. Whether they can ever be truly trustworthy with each other unsupervised is quite uncertain, though.
 

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Neutering may help, it may not, it has even been documented to make things worse. If one of them has true dog aggression, it won't make a lick of difference.

Get a trainer. Don't have any faith in what you have learned online regarding something as potential dangerous (for dogs and for people) as breaking up a dog fight.

Nobody here can tell, without observing, if it is territorial, if they were mixed to soon, if there is true dog aggression out of one or both, if it is fear based etc etc etc.

With something like this, and with supposed human aggression, i think it is flat out negligent for anyone to try and analyse and then give a how to.

Get a trainer, and if you can't get a trainer right now for whatever reason, commit 100% to crating and rotating securely and unconditionally.

Same sex relationships can work out. But more often with strong dogs they don't, and when it goes bad, it can be SUPER bad. So don't chance it.

When I was younger my dad had a mother/daughter. They were iffy for years. But manageable. Well, one day they had a big fight, nobody observed particular trigger. Mom ripped of her daughters ear and gave my dad's girlfriend serious punctures in her hand and leg as she tried to break it up. Hospitalization for IV meds required. Lots of pain.

Get a trainer.
 
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