German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So far my pup knows: Sit,Stay,Come,Up,Down,Walk,Out,Lay Down and Fully Housetrained...Problem is, he's friggin Stubborn! Theres many times I command :Come! He friggin ingores me! Annoying! Usually eating grass, or just something is distracting him and he refuses to listen! This normal at this age?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,364 Posts
Perfectly normal.It's difficult for a puppy to obey when he's busy investigating the world.It takes a lot of practice training when there are distractions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
So far my pup knows: Sit,Stay,Come,Up,Down,Walk,Out,Lay Down and Fully Housetrained...Problem is, he's friggin Stubborn! Theres many times I command :Come! He friggin ingores me! Annoying! Usually eating grass, or just something is distracting him and he refuses to listen! This normal at this age?
It’s normal... try saying “come” and if he doesn’t, don’t repeat yourself just turn around and walk away... he should follow you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,066 Posts
Your puppy is barely four months old. He is like a 4 year old kid. You wouldn't expect a 4 year old kid to have a Masters degree, don't expect your puppy to have a Masters in obedience at this age. You most likely have given your puppy a foundation in obedience. Now you need to start working on distance, duration and distractions. Go at your puppy's pace even if that is a step or two backwards at times. I like this method:
Screenshot_20200627-092717_Chrome.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
Two words: Long leash.
Until 100% recall is obtained. Lots of patience and repetition. Coming to you has to be both fun but an uncompromized expectation.
I don't like training with treats and not at that age but as they get into the independence stage a little older, you might find it helpful. At this stage it isn't necessary, you're the boss!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for your responses guys! Appreciate it! I just bought a 15" long leash, I'll be using this going forward.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,510 Posts
He's a baby. It's your responsibility to teach him. He's not stubborn. He doesn't know and the entire world is more interesting than you. I would look up videos from Dave Kroyer, Ivan, Denise Fenzi, etc and learn how to play games that engage your puppy, teach commands and proof those commands. Or find a trainer to help you. Because you are expecting WAYYYY to much from a baby and putting the blame back on him for that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
He's a baby. It's your responsibility to teach him. He's not stubborn. He doesn't know and the entire world is more interesting than you. I would look up videos from Dave Kroyer, Ivan, Denise Fenzi, etc and learn how to play games that engage your puppy, teach commands and proof those commands. Or find a trainer to help you. Because you are expecting WAYYYY to much from a baby and putting the blame back on him for that.
Not blaming him, just curious if this is normal at this age is all..I do need to learn what games i can play with him besides fetch.,.He doesnt seem that interested in fetch he gets bored easily, though plays for a bit,. Thanks for the info!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,510 Posts
You may not have meant to blame him but your words are "stubborn" and "annoying" and "he refuses to listen". That does put the blame on him. I understand it can be frustrating. I get frustrated. But it's important to not put those feelings and negative words on the dog.

Fetch is not engaging the dog. Fetch is teaching the dog to run away from you for the reward. Engaging the puppy is teaching them the pay with the reward comes thru you. All good things come thru you. That's engagement.

Look up Kroyer. He's only $10/month. Fenzi has entire classes on engaging puppies. I believe both are a little more affordable than Ivan but you may be able to find used DVD's from his program.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,482 Posts
He still has no idea what you expect of him. Have fun, enjoy him, offer praise when you like a behavior. Ignore when you don’t. Reinforce skills.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
It may be normal but it isn't good. A GSD can be a liability and a detriment to the reputation of the breed if it is not under control. If it refuses to come to you when you command it, it is not under control. I'll get some flack on this but too many GSD's are blamed for being aggressive and biting/attacking. It is more often the owners fault and not the dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,066 Posts
A well bred German Shepherd should have a genetic predisposition for aggression.
 
  • Like
Reactions: iBite

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,510 Posts
It may be normal but it isn't good. A GSD can be a liability and a detriment to the reputation of the breed if it is not under control. If it refuses to come to you when you command it, it is not under control. I'll get some flack on this but too many GSD's are blamed for being aggressive and biting/attacking. It is more often the owners fault and not the dog.

I disagree to some extent. The dogs that are "aggressive" and "attacking" are most often poorly bred and nervy. A solid GSD should have natural aggression in their genetic makeup but it shouldn't be reactive to anything and everything. They are also supposed to be aloof. A nervy dog is probably not capable of being aloof. There is also a difference between being reactive aggressive vs civil aggressive. I've had both and there is a world of difference between the two. The first is stressful in the management because it's unpredictable. The second needs to be respected and is very predictable in the rules they set for interaction. Both can be modified with training to some extent.

So, having said that, it IS the owners responsibility to train the dog regardless of genetics. The issue is you can only manage poor genetics, you can't make the dog into something they are not. In the end, obedience is the key (as you are talking about) to make sure the dog has recall and manners and is always under control. If the training isn't there then it is the owners fault.

I think in this case, the puppy is only 16 weeks and shouldn't be expected to have control. He should be on a long line until the recall is solid.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top