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hi

So i just registered on here because i am concerned for our 14 year female GSD. She is my mothers but i am looking after her while she has been living overseas.

In the last month she has lost use of her back legs. She use to be able to push herself up with her front legs but is now unable to do it at all. Ive taken her to the vet for this last year and she has bad arthritis and was given anti inflams and pain relief. We were not able to get a new subscribtion because our 7 year old female decided it would be good idea to scavenge something and get it stuck in her gut, to which we had to pay 5 grand to get her fixed. Now i would pay it again in a heartbeat but it meant we had to sacrifice the older girls meds and now she is in the current predicament.

She has no control of her bowels and because she cant get up she urinates on herself. I give her a wash every night with a bucket of water and animal shampoo. This evening i noticed that she has a lump under one of her rear nipples its very large and feels like a lump u would find in a human breast. ive seen it before but just assumed it was from the way she was laying because she has been bread from when she was alot younger so naturally they are bigger.

Im a bit concerned on what to do and what this lump is. I feel like we are maybe prolonging her life for ourself because we have had her for 14 years and dont want to give her up.

Any ideas from anyone is a similar predicament or have been in the past
 

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IMHO if you cannot afford to keep the dog comfortable with much needed pain medication then you should ask your mother (the dog's owner) to pay for them!!!

But as to the other issues, this is one of those questions that is personal, what I'd do for my dogs may be completely different than what someone else would do in the same situation. It's a tough call, the worst part of owning a pet, but in the end I'm sure you'll do what you believe is right for the dog!!!
 

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IMHO if you cannot afford to keep the dog comfortable with much needed pain medication then you should ask your mother (the dog's owner) to pay for them!!!

But as to the other issues, this is one of those questions that is personal, what I'd do for my dogs may be completely different than what someone else would do in the same situation. It's a tough call, the worst part of owning a pet, but in the end I'm sure you'll do what you believe is right for the dog!!!
My MOTHER is the one who paid for the surgery, she pays for everything relating to the dogs. We had to sacrifice meds for a month no more because our other dogs medical bills were so high. Our vet doesnt do payment plans. So my mother and father may earn good money but being hit with a 5 grand vet bill all at once is not something u can prepare for. She is back on the meds now. We were given two options for the meds she needed, the cheap ones which distroy the animals kidneys organs or the one which is for longterm use which is 4 times the price. We chose the long term use so our dog could be with us longer without having other medical issues.
 

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My last German Shepherd, Shelby, had several health issues. She was diagnosed with parianal fustulas at age 6-1/2 and then arthritis at age 10; however, both were managed extremely well with medication and her quality of life was still excellent. After each cartrophen injection, she was running around like she was a puppy again. Last summer, when she was 12-1/2, she was diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma. She had a tumor on her back right hip and 3 masses on her spleen. The vet was optimistic that the tumor on her back hip and her spleen could be removed, so I went ahead with the surgery. She came through it with flying colors and was back to her old self again when she came home 4 days later. Unfortunately, 8 days after I brought her home, another tumor popped up on her back left hip (that wasn't there when she had the surgery) and another ultrasound revealed that there were more masses in her stomach and on her kidneys. Shelby was a determined and stubborn dog and was not yet ready to give up, so I brought her home knowing that it was only a matter of time. Two days later, she refused to get up and, as I looked into her eyes and saw that her determination was gone, I knew what I had to do. It definitely wasn't what was best for me because I was heartbroken, but it was what was best for her because I was not going to allow her to suffer.
 

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My last German Shepherd, Shelby, had several health issues. She was diagnosed with parianal fustulas at age 6-1/2 and then arthritis at age 10; however, both were managed extremely well with medication and her quality of life was still excellent. After each cartrophen injection, she was running around like she was a puppy again. Last summer, when she was 12-1/2, she was diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma. She had a tumor on her back right hip and 3 masses on her spleen. The vet was optimistic that the tumor on her back hip and her spleen could be removed, so I went ahead with the surgery. She came through it with flying colors and was back to her old self again when she came home 4 days later. Unfortunately, 8 days after I brought her home, another tumor popped up on her back left hip (that wasn't there when she had the surgery) and another ultrasound revealed that there were more masses in her stomach and on her kidneys. Shelby was a determined and stubborn dog and was not yet ready to give up, so I brought her home knowing that it was only a matter of time. Two days later, she refused to get up and, as I looked into her eyes and saw that her determination was gone, I knew what I had to do. It definitely wasn't what was best for me because I was heartbroken, but it was what was best for her because I was not going to allow her to suffer.
yeh see Tara is the same very stubborn dog who has a great life i mean she is almost 15 which is just amazing for a german shepherd. We have never had any medical issues with her besides her arthritis which was only evident in the last 12 months and she gave birth to two very large litters or 13 and 12 pups. But she was always our dog and mum never wanted to breed her more than twice because of that even though she is a registered breeder. My brothers and i truly believe is holding out for our mum because she wants to see her before she passes.

She still interacts with us and gives us kisses and is still obsessed with her food. She is very aware still even though she is hard of hearing. I just wonder if im maybe looking for excuses. Its hard as well because she is my mums dog and she is overseas. My mum said she trusts my judgment even though she wishes this wasnt happening.
 

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Clipper is 12 years old and has a large lump on his right ribs. I had it checked out by the vet.i have opted to just keep him comfortable, spoil him, just keep on loving him up. You could have the vet check the lump. I also put Clipper on the adequin shots which has helped his mobility greatly. His hips and back legs had become very bad, he'd fall when he tried to poop sometimes. I plan to keep him on the shots to add to his comfort.he also takes pain medication.right now he eats well, is able to get around, doesn't appear to be in a lot of pain, seems content. As arycrest said it is a personnal decision, having the lump checked out just so you know what it could be might bring u peace of mind on that. With Clipper, that helped me just to know. For now I am doing quality of life.
 

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thanks i already have a vet appointment for tuesday because its a public holiday on monday here.

Those shots u talking about the ones where u come three weeks in a row and then 3 months later because we have tara on those but i havent really seen a great amount of help with it
 

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If you have an appointment to take Tara (that was the name of my mother's dog as well) to the vet on Tuesday, you will receive an unbiased and professional opinion that is not based on emotion. Sometimes we convince ourselves that things aren't as bad as they seem because we don't want to face the fact that they really are. We're never prepared to say good-bye to our beloved pet no matter how old they are, but ask yourself what advice you would give if Tara was someone else's dog. It is a personal decision, and one of the most difficult that any of us will ever have to make.
 

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My vet offers a laser treatment for hip/joint problems. I only discussed it briefly with him, but it sounds like it helps. Maybe see if the vet has something like that.
 
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