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Hey I’m a first owner of a gsd this is new to me but i been doing research on gsd and I been working hard on it my girl Skyler is smart and getting smarter I started training her to do tricks and some command s but now last Saturday she’turt 13 week s old she’ was doing so much better with the land sharks but now out of the blue she barks and growls at me and my husband even snaps at us I put her in the crate with no toys and when she’s out she does it again my husband gets home around 5pm and I work every other day but not anymore tomorrow I will be home all day but I still have thangs I half to do and Skyler loves to ride in the truck but not all places let dogs come in and when I get home I let her out And she screams and jumps on me and then pees I’m just so new to this gsd is a lot of work but I love her so much and would never give up on her just lost what to do next ?
 

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What i have learned so far (since this is also my first gsd), keep them mentally and physically motivated. We let Odin get used to the house for two day's after that we started teaching him commands and house rules. Indeed there were times i wanted to pull my hairs out but just remain calm and patient sometimes you just think it's useless. But by just being calm and patient and rewarding her for good behavior it will all come in time.

But give her the attention she needs like @konathegsd said. She is just snapping at you trying to say hey play with me, im bored!

If Odin isn't showing the correct behavior and biting i just softly push him away and i calmly say "no Odin this isn't how a good dog behaves" 9/10 times he will calm down. But let's not forget that they are still puppies and need to feel secure and loved. I am definitely not an expert, but so far i learned a tired satisfied puppy is a good puppy :).

You will get there eventually, mine is now 4 month's and behaving much better and listening better by the day.

 

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There is no such thing as a 13 wks old puppy being aggressive. So get that out of you mind now... There is a dynamic that you can set up, or avoid which is greatly preferred, which creates an atmosphere of conflict...don't do that! Your little puppy is a baby..like a 2 yr old child. No reasoning with them when they're tired and need a nap, you just put them down for a nap! Quietly and without emotion or conflict.

Behavior that you don't like is discouraged, behavior that you like is encouraged...not rocket science!

Just remember, your job is to LEAD your puppy into the behaviors you want to see, while ignoring them and their misbehaviors while getting them there....it's a marathon not a race. Puppies will be puppies, just be fair and patient, they do grow up...
 

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As others have said, she isn't being aggressive, she is barking to get your attention. Make sure you are not inadvertently rewarding this behavior. Ignoring the barking worked better for my girl than trying to 'correct' the behavior, especially at such a young age! Try and be patient, I know it's hard :) Remember to reward her when she is calm, she will soon get the hint! It might be worth considering how much exercise / play she is getting and try and ensure this is structured for her, so she knows when to expect her walks / play time and when she is expected to relax and sleep.

Also, I usually take my girl for a long walk before I put her in her crate, her body and mind will more easily relax after exercise. Once you return home, try and ignore her, don't say anything and calmly take her out of the crate and straight outside to go pee. Reward her for being calm and going outside :)
 

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There is no such thing as a 13 wks old puppy being aggressive. So get that out of you mind now... There is a dynamic that you can set up, or avoid which is greatly preferred, which creates an atmosphere of conflict...don't do that! Your little puppy is a baby..like a 2 yr old child. No reasoning with them when they're tired and need a nap, you just put them down for a nap! Quietly and without emotion or conflict.

Behavior that you don't like is discouraged, behavior that you like is encouraged...not rocket science!

Just remember, your job is to LEAD your puppy into the behaviors you want to see, while ignoring them and their misbehaviors while getting them there....it's a marathon not a race. Puppies will be puppies, just be fair and patient, they do grow up...
I also feel you may want to see/talk with a quality dog trainer to help you understand more about the 4 legged friend you have brought into your life. :smile2: At the least read a couple books.
 

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There is no such thing as a 13 wks old puppy being aggressive. So get that out of you mind now... There is a dynamic that you can set up, or avoid which is greatly preferred, which creates an atmosphere of conflict...don't do that! Your little puppy is a baby..like a 2 yr old child. No reasoning with them when they're tired and need a nap, you just put them down for a nap! Quietly and without emotion or conflict.

Behavior that you don't like is discouraged, behavior that you like is encouraged...not rocket science!

Just remember, your job is to LEAD your puppy into the behaviors you want to see, while ignoring them and their misbehaviors while getting them there....it's a marathon not a race. Puppies will be puppies, just be fair and patient, they do grow up...
I just wanted to expand on this a bit. I agree with everything Tim said and it is the basis for why I don't "train" puppies.
I am a firm believer that dogs, like children, learn what they live. If you raise a pup with emotional, aggressive actions that is what it will learn and how it will react to any given situation. And you cannot reason with a dog anymore then you can with a toddler, they just don't get it.
Puppies in my house spend their first months learning me, they learn what pleases me and what doesn't. To do this I praise what I like and ignore what I don't. I expect biting, chewing, ankle shredding and outbursts. I just don't reward them with attention.
I think that putting a ton of pressure to learn on youngsters impairs the relationship, so I go out of my way to make sure that I am setting up success. I don't like being jumped on so I not only don't touch jumping puppies, I try to stay at their level when I am interacting with them. I crouch down to pet them and speak to them, I remove the need to jump up. I don't want my puppies learning to pee in the house, so I don't let it happen. When removing from crates I scoop them up and carry them outside. That way when they pee from excitement it's outside, and I can praise it. I dislike barking and fussing so I set naptimes before they get wound up and cranky. I don't like my belongings chewed so I limit access to rooms and keep the room we are in free of anything but toys at floor level. My whole set up is designed to minimize confrontation and remove the necessity to do battle, and I don't get mad at puppies for being puppies.
 
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