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I read from a few sources that it's better to keep them on lead everywhere as pups so they don't self reinforce bad behaviour and learn they can run away so that's what I did once pup started torturing the outside cats...

I'm definitely starting to incorporate lots of off leash since she seems much less of a tornado recently compared to her first 'phase'.
Well, that certainly proves that you can't (or shouldn't) believe everything you read! As MAWL said, keeping a puppy on a lead all the time actually tends to cause more problems than it tries to solve! Anyway, glad to hear you're making progress with that little cuty.
 

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Thanks again for all the advice! Yesterday I took her out and tried changing my approach, because I had a feeling part of her reactivity was due to -my- reactivity. Since dog reactivity is my worst nightmare, I would always pay so much attention to other dogs and pray she won't bark. Yesterday I didn't even look at them. She threw a few barks at a dog then calmed down.

Aand as a bonus she got to meet this -super- stable adult dog that was soo calming for her. They sniffed eachother and the adult taught her the doggy greeting which I've never seen her do before. Afterwards she played with a puppy lab in a lonely park and she was so much wiser than I expected, she didn't bark, lose her mind or annoy him but she wasn't a pushover either. I think things are really looking forward.
 

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Well, that certainly proves that you can't (or shouldn't) believe everything you read! As MAWL said, keeping a puppy on a lead all the time actually tends to cause more problems than it tries to solve! Anyway, glad to hear you're making progress with that little cuty.
That makes a lot of sense. I'm very glad I stumbled upon this forum, the training approaches here seems much better to what I saw on the internet and youtube videos previously - there are a lot of similarities but there are also a few differences.
 

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When they don't, I hide behind something and teach them to pay attention by allowing them to worry where I am. It has helped a lot to have them pay attention to where I am.

Ha ha I did this with Biscuit one day when she was off sniffing checking out trails without me. Hid behind a bush. Oh boy did she come running backwards looking for me all panicked. I felt a bit bad but now I get them ears turned backwards checking on me.
Thanks again for all the advice! Yesterday I took her out and tried changing my approach, because I had a feeling part of her reactivity was due to -my- reactivity. Since dog reactivity is my worst nightmare, I would always pay so much attention to other dogs and pray she won't bark. Yesterday I didn't even look at them. She threw a few barks at a dog then calmed down.

Aand as a bonus she got to meet this -super- stable adult dog that was soo calming for her. They sniffed eachother and the adult taught her the doggy greeting which I've never seen her do before. Afterwards she played with a puppy lab in a lonely park and she was so much wiser than I expected, she didn't bark, lose her mind or annoy him but she wasn't a pushover either. I think things are really looking forward.
Wonderful! It's funny I've become to read owners body language more than dogs. If I'm approaching someone and they start tensing I quickly move on. I'm very active in my approach to try and remain calm. I try to always walk loose leash, without tension so B doesn't pick up on that. She loves to say hi to dogs so will often pull close to them last minute. It's a tough job doing zero tension whilst gripping the leash tightly with my life 😂

Yes this forum is wonderful there is an incredible array of experience. Keep an open mind to everything you think you know!
 

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I adopted a female King shepherd that was about as reactive as your pup . When I got her she was a yr old and lived with packs of dogs- owners were breeders.

One day on a walk (and this happened a lot in the boonies) -a dog was loose and ran straight for the trouble maker-a fight followed until the slow-to-move owner got her dog. I was controlling 2 dogs on the walk. After that if I knew where loose dogs lived (after awhile you know) and I would put my two (esp. the King) in a sit/stay so she couldn't be reactive sometimes I think somehow she instigated it -evil eye maybe? jk. The sit and face away from the house or dog worked really well and after awhile she ignored the loose dogs when she learned I would handle it. I rotated walking the 7 of them pairing by 'friends'.

At the breeders they would have all their dogs (25?) out to play in a field and most of the dogs would bite her if she tried to run after a ball. When I picked her up she had a few bites on her face that were bleeding,. I think this activity: leaving her to her own defenses caused her to be dog aggressive but I doubt it was her nature.

There is an expression I've heard many times "friends don't let friends use retractable leashes" and it's for you because that stupid rope can wrap around a finger, the dog pulls and sometimes the finger doesn't do very well. The rest of what you're doing is great --asking for opinions or advice is very helpful. Often we're too close to the situation to see the forest thru the trees. Good luck with your pup!
 
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