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Hi, so I'd first like to say that she is -not- fearful at all. She hasn't ever been fearful even for a moment ever since I brought her home. She has an older gsd (thankfully, very patient) to play with at home and she doesn't bark at him or at the dogs she sees often.

One time, she lunged at this stray female dog that had pups and the female corrected her so harshly that -I- got scared - snarled and jumped right at her to nip. What did my puppy do? Bark, lunge and show the female who's the boss. The only dog that's capable of sparking a hint of respect within my puppy is my older gsd (after having his face repeatedly tugged on for 30 minutes)

Now, training... She's very good at harnessing this energy to listen. When she's a tornado, telling her to sit and what to do will work wonders to get her to calm down and it kind of works with dogs as well, but only kind of. She's only passed 1 VERY calm dog so far (and she wasn't walking) and didn't bark like a maniac. Smaller dogs are a nightmare though, those are the ones that make it impossible to communicate with her...

The main issue here is that yes, I can take her out and train her to get over dogs but she's just 10 weeks after all and if I don't train heel on walks all the time she'll start pulling, so I can't only focus on the dogs. Furthermore, how can I socialize her without reinforcing this behaviour?

Sorry for the long post. I'd also like to mention that in my city there are no such things as puppy daycares, group lessons or trainers that are willing to work with pups below 6 months.
 

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Your puppy sounds like a good dog! Reacting to potential threats is what you want to see!

Socializing a puppy is all about showing them many "environments", many situations and obstacles that they need to see and understand. It doesn't necessarily involve meeting lots of new people or dogs, but it can if that's possible to do safely.

The main thing, at least from my perspective, is to introduce as many situations - either obstacles, situations, people, or other animals of all kinds, that you can while helping the pup navigate those things.

It takes time, but it pays off later for sure! Congratulations on the new puppy! Enjoy!!!
 

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Your puppy sounds like a good dog! Reacting to potential threats is what you want to see!

Socializing a puppy is all about showing them many "environments", many situations and obstacles that they need to see and understand. It doesn't necessarily involve meeting lots of new people or dogs, but it can if that's possible to do safely.

The main thing, at least from my perspective, is to introduce as many situations - either obstacles, situations, people, or other animals of all kinds, that you can while helping the pup navigate those things.

It takes time, but it pays off later for sure! Congratulations on the new puppy! Enjoy!!!
Thank you! She actually looks a whole lot like the pup in your profile!

I've been doing that and she's so flawless at it, a huge truck even honked its horn in her face (quite rude but it happens...) And she just looked at it like "oh ok". It's only dogs she has issues with!
 

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Every dog owner will want to see certain traits in their pups. I wouldn’t be pleased with a 10 week old barking at other dogs. I want an alert puppy, but not a reactive puppy.
If you want to curb it, limit walks to dog free areas until you get the pup in a solid walk, with the focus on you, while still being alert to his/her surroundings. Favorite treats, toys, and redirection on your walks while training will help. Once you have that down, then start slowly using more dog populated areas to practice his/her focus on you, and not the barking dog or little dogs that act like big ones. Good luck! I’ll stop now, I just came on to show off cute puppy pictures.
 

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Why are you walking her at heel on walks when she is only 10 weeks old? You are creating excitement and frustration so she reacts and barks. Take your puppy out and have fun, she needs to have fun too.

Do you have somewhere safe that you can take her to walk off leash? The benefits of off leash walking for a puppy are phenomenal. Off leash walking heads off many current and future problems.
 

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Go wear her out until her tongue is hanging out and then practice walking past distractions, at distance, under threshold. Reward good behavior.

You aren't going to see the behavior you want to see in an excited, frustrated dog. Yes, redirection and rewarding good behavior works, but only if there is good behavior to reward. Set the pup up for success!
 

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Why are you walking her at heel on walks when she is only 10 weeks old? You are creating excitement and frustration so she reacts and barks. Take your puppy out and have fun, she needs to have fun too.

Do you have somewhere safe that you can take her to walk off leash? The benefits of off leash walking for a puppy are phenomenal. Off leash walking heads off many current and future problems.
Hi! I'm not having her heel constantly, but whenever there are people around she wants to approach them so that's when I call her to heel for a few seconds. Similarly, I call her to heel when she starts pulling. Your off leash idea is great, I'm just a bit nervous about it but I'll try it! I also bought a retractable leash which hopefully will help it.

Do you mind elaborating a little bit on how should I go about it? Is it fine if she runs off, I call her and she'd rather do something else, doesn't it teach her not to listen to me? Or is it better to just let her do her thing and not call her back at all?
 

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At this age, they typically want to follow you. It's a great time to reward that behavior and make it a habit. It's also a great way to work on recall.
 

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At this age, they typically want to follow you. It's a great time to reward that behavior and make it a habit. It's also a great way to work on recall.
She does, but not when there are 'bigger' distractions around. I think I'll try taking her to isolated areas along with my older, well behaved dog at first since she always follows him around. Thank you!
 

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When I hear a dog give another dog a correction, it is not a growl or lunge. Those are warnings. A correction is a physical attack, a bite. I wouldn't take any dog around another dog that has puppies, let alone a 10 week old. Its best to keep your distance. Your puppy may appear brave, but if if that stray dog had actually corrected your puppy, at best she would have been extremely rattled. Depending on the temperament of the other dog she could have been killed. For me, I don't start working real leash manners till around 4 months. It is perfectly fine to start working on good leash manners now though. At 10 weeks, your dog most likely is showing frustration at not being able to meet and greet the other dogs she sees. I bet she would calm down if she was allowed to meet them. I wouldn't do that until she's fully vaccinated though.I would focus on tiring her out, then walking past other dogs outside of her reactivity threshold. I would reinforce with praise whenever she remained calm, and move away whenever she became reactive. If you live in an urban area, be careful where you choose to walk her off leash. I wouldn't do it near traffic or roads in general.
 

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Like David stated, at this age you tend to be tripping over them. They are babies. They aren't going anywhere.

If your older dog has an excellent recall, he can be a fantastic teacher for your puppy. Just make sure that you take the pup out alone once in a while to practice what he has learned.

I think at this age you need to pick and choose your battles. A ten week old puppy is not going to run away. Instinctively, they know that you are their safety net. If he takes off to greet a friendly dog, let it go. Now if you see the dog coming first, then call him to you before he sees the distraction. Know ahead of time what you want your puppy to do in the presence of distractions and show him what you want him to do. Sometimes you just want to step a few steps back in the opposite direction and have the pup look at you and follow when you see a distraction.
 

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Hi! I'm not having her heel constantly, but whenever there are people around she wants to approach them so that's when I call her to heel for a few seconds. Similarly, I call her to heel when she starts pulling. Your off leash idea is great, I'm just a bit nervous about it but I'll try it! I also bought a retractable leash which hopefully will help it.

Do you mind elaborating a little bit on how should I go about it? Is it fine if she runs off, I call her and she'd rather do something else, doesn't it teach her not to listen to me? Or is it better to just let her do her thing and not call her back at all?
This is a really good question, that often gets glossed over or forgotten.
The answer is multi-faceted. You teach your puppy from a very early age, that coming to you is in their best interest! How?

By not calling them when chances of compliance is low, like when they're playing with another puppy, or when they're distracted by something fascinating! So it takes lots of self-control on your part! Not something most people like to hear LOL!

But it's really important to lay that proper foundation, as it makes life with your dog so much easier and pleasant in the future!

As others have mentioned, starting early on, it's important IMHO to take advantage of a puppy's desire to follow, to get the used to off-leash exploration with you. It's good for the puppy, it's great for your relationship with your puppy, and it's really good practice for you on trusting your dog!

Rather than expecting the worst, and so always trying to prevent it. Expect the best, and always work to reinforce that behavior in your dog as she matures.

My dog is now almost 4 yrs old, she's off-leash more than on, and goes with me everywhere. But 5-6 months she went through a defiant stage and would look right at me and blow off a recall.

So yeah, there are phases you'll deal with as your puppy grows up. It's all just part of growing up.

Good luck! Have fun with your puppy, and show us some pictures already!
 

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great advice already given. I second the set them up for success idea at this age. Use your come command around the house a lot, throw a party, have a tasty treat or even have his dinner suddenly appear once your pup comes. The come command should never result in anything negative. Once we are done playing in the park, I have Biscuit come, I re-leash her, and I'll throw her toy once more so the lead doesn't = fun over. I was terrified leaving Biscuit off leash at the start without any decent recalls practiced but she just followed us around so well.

Now after some trial and error I use a harness with a long 5m line attached to the back. It's so easy to pick up the lead if you want, and your dog doesn't even know most the time so they won't pick up on all that tension in you 😂. So we use a flat collar and regular lead to do leash work, but at the park switch to the harness/long line. The harness back clip just stops her tripping up. Be the most exciting thing at the park, run around, frollic, be silly and have fun with your pup. If they come surprise them with a toy. It's a really enjoyable time.

About the barking I wouldn't want a shepherd barking at dogs at this age. Try people watching on the bench. Bring your pup for a walk so it's tired, then just sit and watch the world go by. Ideally in a place with plenty of people and dogs (and bikes, scooters, prams, cars etc). They will soon realise that lots of stuff goes on in the world that they dont need to worry about. Biscuit would try so hard to stay awake to stare at everything going past.

Mines now 5 months and certainly going through her defiant phase that Tim mentioned 😫
 

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Pictures as requested! I took her out yesterday morning, it was a little hot and she was also tired, we passed a few dogs behind the fence she -always- argued with and she didn't make a sound! Today we walked in the forest off leash and only picked it up when she encountered 2 little dogs that barked at her. She -did- bark, but I felt like it wasn't as bad as usual, so I think she's getting better! Her recall is also pretty good for her age, I think. She listens on walks when there aren't dogs around and I practice calling her back once she wanders off ahead and she seems to love it because her little head is staring at me, tongue hanging out! It's rare she ever wants to inspect something so I always let her do it when she's interested.

My older dog is an absolute sweetheart, extremely wise and docile and has the polar opposite personality from my puppy. When I brought him home at 4 months (big mistake, I learned from that...) he was too skittish to even walk on the street! I'm always filled with love and pride whenever people are amazed at how good he is (most dogs are terribly trained in my country). His only issue is that he's reactive against agitated dogs. He's been charged at by barking monsters multiple times, got the tip of his ear bitten off by an off leash bigger dog and the blame was, always, shifted on me because he looks big and scary, lots of people shouted at me that I shouldn't walk such a dog. Because of this I haven't been able to take him some places he'd have lots of fun in and it breaks my heart, so I really don't want it to happen with the little pup all over again!

Thank you for all the advice, it makes me feel like not all hope is lost!
 

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This is a really good question, that often gets glossed over or forgotten.
The answer is multi-faceted. You teach your puppy from a very early age, that coming to you is in their best interest! How?

By not calling them when chances of compliance is low, like when they're playing with another puppy, or when they're distracted by something fascinating! So it takes lots of self-control on your part! Not something most people like to hear LOL!

But it's really important to lay that proper foundation, as it makes life with your dog so much easier and pleasant in the future!

As others have mentioned, starting early on, it's important IMHO to take advantage of a puppy's desire to follow, to get the used to off-leash exploration with you. It's good for the puppy, it's great for your relationship with your puppy, and it's really good practice for you on trusting your dog!

Rather than expecting the worst, and so always trying to prevent it. Expect the best, and always work to reinforce that behavior in your dog as she matures.

My dog is now almost 4 yrs old, she's off-leash more than on, and goes with me everywhere. But 5-6 months she went through a defiant stage and would look right at me and blow off a recall.

So yeah, there are phases you'll deal with as your puppy grows up. It's all just part of growing up.

Good luck! Have fun with your puppy, and show us some pictures already!
Tim, I think you touched on an important topic. So many people put leashes on young puppies and hang on to it like a lifeline. This so often creates big time reactivity problems, poor recalls, and even aggression down the road. It seems like no matter the future training, the owners have had so many bad experiences with their dogs, that going off leash is no longer an option on the table.
 

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Tim, I think you touched on an important topic. So many people put leashes on young puppies and hang on to it like a lifeline. This so often creates big time reactivity problems, poor recalls, and even aggression down the road. It seems like no matter the future training, the owners have had so many bad experiences with their dogs, that going off leash is no longer an option on the table.

I read from a few sources that it's better to keep them on lead everywhere as pups so they don't self reinforce bad behaviour and learn they can run away so that's what I did once pup started torturing the outside cats...

I'm definitely starting to incorporate lots of off leash since she seems much less of a tornado recently compared to her first 'phase'.
 

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I keep pups off leash as much as possible unless we are in traffic or where there are distractions like dogs and people around. That way they learn to pay attention to me. When they don't, I hide behind something and teach them to pay attention by allowing them to worry where I am. It has helped a lot to have them pay attention to where I am. Even with the Whippets in the past. No other Whippet owner dared to let them off leash but mine never took advantage of being off leash and it goes for GSDs as well IMO.
By the way I wouldn't be proud of my "brave" puppy if it barked at another dog at 10 weeks old but would see that as a training necessity.
 
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