Hypothetical: Better for an homeless dog to have no home or be euthanized OR go to.. - Page 2 - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #11 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-10-2013, 11:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Freestep View Post
I deal with a lot of pet owners, and I'll tell you this much: some of those pets would be better off with a cash-strapped owner who truly cares for them, than they are in the well-off home they are ignored in--not to mention pets in shelters!

I was once homeless, no money. All I had was my dog. Many people would probably say I shouldn't have a dog I couldn't afford. But I took care of that dog, she ate before I did, went everywhere I went, played Frisbee every day, and we kept each other warm at night. She was my best friend, sometimes my only friend. I made a lot of mistakes with her as she was my first dog, but she was resilient and forgiving and loyal.

Eventually I got back on my feet, got a job, bought a house, and that dog lived out her golden years in the lap of luxury. She lived to be 16 years old.

Money isn't what makes a good pet owner. As long as the owner cares for the pet, takes responsibility, and gets its needs met, many dogs will be a heck of a lot happier living with a poor person that spends time with them, than they are languishing in a shelter, or thrown in the backyard of a nice big house and ignored.

Veterinary care is expensive, but there are low-cost vaccine clinics, spay and neuter. There is Care Credit for emergencies. In this country, pets do have a safety net. I'm not saying that poor people who can barely feed themselves should be getting a bunch of animals, but most of the homeless around here have dogs, and they all look pretty healthy, good weight, etc. Possibly in need of grooming, but when you have a hammer all you see are nails.

The problem is weeding out the bad owners whether rich or poor. There are just as many bad rich owners as there are bad poor owners, so adoptions should be granted on something other than income, IMO.
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Not much to add to this post. Thank you.
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post #12 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-10-2013, 11:42 AM
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dogs dont recognize money. A homeless person is often a better owner than a millionaire. Probably one of the worst case scenarios is a shelter who keeps dogs in cages instead of rehoming them.
There's a homeless man who sits on the street corner here with his mixed dog. He has a sign that says "Will work for dog food." He always has the dog sitting next to him on a rope under the comforter he uses for his shelter/coat. I bought him a small bag of dog food. Although he's homeless and the dog probably doesn't get vet care, the dog looks happy and well fed. I think he's a better owner than the yahoo down the block from me who keeps his pitbull on a chain outside year round on a chain with nothing more than a piece of plywood for shelter and some handfuls of food thrown on the ground.

*-*Summer*-*
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post #13 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-10-2013, 01:24 PM
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I think if they can't afford the adoption fee but could provide it a nice loving home with food and shelter and some vet care then they should be required to volunteer at the shelter to earn the dog.
That way the shelter has additional volunteers and it's not just handing a dog over for free. Or even, XX hours equals so much $ towards the adoption fee. If you have to work for something you value it more than if it were just given to you.


A good pet owner isn't based on how much money a person has but how they treat their pets.

Last edited by stmcfred; 12-10-2013 at 01:26 PM.
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post #14 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-10-2013, 01:31 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Freestep View Post
I deal with a lot of pet owners, and I'll tell you this much: some of those pets would be better off with a cash-strapped owner who truly cares for them, than they are in the well-off home they are ignored in--not to mention pets in shelters!

I was once homeless, no money. All I had was my dog. Many people would probably say I shouldn't have a dog I couldn't afford. But I took care of that dog, she ate before I did, went everywhere I went, played Frisbee every day, and we kept each other warm at night. She was my best friend, sometimes my only friend. I made a lot of mistakes with her as she was my first dog, but she was resilient and forgiving and loyal.

Eventually I got back on my feet, got a job, bought a house, and that dog lived out her golden years in the lap of luxury. She lived to be 16 years old.

Money isn't what makes a good pet owner. As long as the owner cares for the pet, takes responsibility, and gets its needs met, many dogs will be a heck of a lot happier living with a poor person that spends time with them, than they are languishing in a shelter, or thrown in the backyard of a nice big house and ignored.

Veterinary care is expensive, but there are low-cost vaccine clinics, spay and neuter. There is Care Credit for emergencies. In this country, pets do have a safety net. I'm not saying that poor people who can barely feed themselves should be getting a bunch of animals, but most of the homeless around here have dogs, and they all look pretty healthy, good weight, etc. Possibly in need of grooming, but when you have a hammer all you see are nails.

The problem is weeding out the bad owners whether rich or poor. There are just as many bad rich owners as there are bad poor owners, so adoptions should be granted on something other than income, IMO.
Freestep your post really stood out to me, because you have actually been there. Thanks for sharing about your previous situation. You sound the like the prime person i was thinking of in my head when i thought i would let a dog go to a homeless person or poor person.
I agree with it, there ARE plenty of good and bad owners, rich or poor. In fact our most recent abuse case happened with a homeless man- and we are still in court with it..
I know for our shelter, we don't do vet checks, we don't call landlords, we just look at what they put on their application and ask a few essential questions- that usually go in one ear and out the other i find.. And we are reading what they wanted us to see.

Magwart, when i first posted the question i guess i was thinking about adopters that come through my shelter, and i live in VT, USA. But it defiantly changes a lot when it becomes a world wide debate. And down south in US, is in itself, a whole different story than where i live.

Thanks for your replies everyone, of course it just opens up more debate for me, which is good! And i agree with what Shade, said there is no perfect answer.

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post #15 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-10-2013, 01:46 PM
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I was pretty hesitant when I got my first dog directly from the pound/shelter. I was out of work. I was renting. (an unlovely house in dire need of maintenance but in a fairly good neighborhood.) I had fenced the yard myself. My previous dogs had just died and the vet expenses had been pretty high. I drove a very beat up VW. I knew you had to fill out an application & I wondered what they would think.
I did have the money for the adoption fee (it came with a free vet visit, discounted spay, etc.) I looked at several dogs in several shelters. This one I found when I was out of town for a job interview. Didn't get the job but I got the dog which was the better deal!
The pup lived to be 15, moved to two other states with me, went on many long walks and many road trips. She got vet care and food. And a lot more.

Many of our walks took us past people who had owned their homes for years. Their dogs languished in their yards night after night.
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post #16 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-10-2013, 02:00 PM
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It's really regional.

In our area, a friendly, healthy, and reasonably well-behaved dog of any breed other than a pittie can find a good to great home. For pitties, unfortunately, there's just a massive oversupply and limited demand, so they are at risk of euthanasia even if they're totally nice dogs. But for just about any other breed, this dilemma does not really exist -- that's why we have the ability to bring up dogs from other regions and find them great homes here.

So we don't need to settle for homes that are just barely acceptable, because the dogs will find good to great homes eventually.

But that is certainly a luxury that not everyone enjoys.

Honestly, if I lived in a region where I could not send my own foster dogs to the very best homes around, I think I'd burn out pretty darn fast. It hurts to spend time, money, and emotional energy on a dog, and then watch it go to a home where that foundational training will be wasted and your careful nurturing of the dog's ability to bond will go neglected. I wouldn't be able to do it.

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post #17 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-14-2013, 08:18 PM
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Difficult question. I and some friends have gone through tough times the last few years when things were really bad with the economy. I always made sure my dog was fed and I never even really thought about it. I know my friends feel the same way. Having said this, I realize there are others who would not do the same. Personally, I think it is better to give people a chance with the pup.
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post #18 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-22-2013, 10:12 AM
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i would rather have a dog live with the bare minimum than pts.
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post #19 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-22-2013, 10:53 AM
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I have also been homeless with a dog and a cat and I was pregnant. They always came first. They had food, water, and lots of love. Got on my feet and they were always with me. I don't think money determines a good owner. I do think that every dog has a right to a home filled with love. No dog should be abused or used for dog fighting. I do think that every dog deserves a chance and I respect people that put everything into a "problem" dog, because it is not the dogs fault to begin with. I have two dogs that came from the same over crowded kill shelter. I feel blessed to have them and I am glad I got them. Both of my dogs had a good chance of being put to sleep and I cringe at that thought. Misty my oldest was brought back to the shelter 3 times within 8 months and to this day(8 yrs later) I have no clue why. She is smart, sometimes to smart for her own good. It did take her a long time to get potty trained, but we've got that down pat now. And Midnite was not doing well in the shelter. He was very anxious and that anxiety almost was the end of him. Again not his fault, he is a working line GSD that was locked in a cage 24/7 for a couple months. He also needed some work and I am glad I put the time in with him. I would do it a million times, if it meant saving a dogs life.

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post #20 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-22-2013, 11:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SummerGSDLover View Post
There's a homeless man who sits on the street corner here with his mixed dog. He has a sign that says "Will work for dog food." He always has the dog sitting next to him on a rope under the comforter he uses for his shelter/coat. I bought him a small bag of dog food. Although he's homeless and the dog probably doesn't get vet care, the dog looks happy and well fed. I think he's a better owner than the yahoo down the block from me who keeps his pitbull on a chain outside year round on a chain with nothing more than a piece of plywood for shelter and some handfuls of food thrown on the ground.

*-*Summer*-*
I love that, i always donate pet food, along with good quality winter jackets, mittens and hats. Its so important to help out were you can, even if its a simple can of dog food or a soup of some sort
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