Obedience and tricks - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-14-2019, 06:27 AM Thread Starter
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Obedience and tricks

Hey guys,

So now itís been almost 8 months with my boy, I honestly could not afford to train him professionally, some of the topics I read about trainings recommend the obedience training to start at the age of 3 months old, while other topics says 8 months plus.

I want to ask this important question to you GSD owners, is it late for me to get him trained? Until what age is ok to start if late.

Thanks and seeking your advices

T



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post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-14-2019, 07:38 AM
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I started obedience training as soon as I brought mine home at 8 weeks. Obedience training isn't just a formal class or something that you can only take with a trainer around, it could be as simple as having him sit, stay, come on YOUR demand. I didn't have a formal training until mine was 10 months. So all obedience training and tricks, I taught him myself. It's definitely do-able even if you're on a budget.
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post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-14-2019, 11:02 AM
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It's definitely not too late. Go for it. You can train him on your own if you like. There are lots of online resources and books you can read (free at the library) to get you started. Also, if your dog is not aggressive around other dogs, group obedience classes are much cheaper than private lessons. Training your dog is fun and a great bonding experience for you and your dog. Better late than never!
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post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-14-2019, 12:05 PM
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Dogs can learn at any age. Younger puppies don't have as long an attention span as an adult, so older puppies/adults can be easier to train than puppies. In any case, I agree with sebrench, better late than never!
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post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-14-2019, 12:17 PM Thread Starter
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Many thanks to all. Made me feel better. But I must say he is quite aggressive with other animals.
2 days back I took him to the vet for a general check up and after paying the bill and while leaving, I saw another customer with 2 small toy dogs stepping in, my dog growled like I have never heard him before. He then snapped at them when I had to pull him firmly. So he must get trained to be good with other animals


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post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-14-2019, 12:34 PM
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You might train him to behave better around other animals, but good luck training him to be "good with other animals." Often, animal/dog aggression is a genetic trait. My experience is that if a dog is good with other animals you see it from the very beginning, unless the dog was attacked by another dog.
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post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-14-2019, 12:56 PM Thread Starter
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Omg noooo


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post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-14-2019, 01:11 PM
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I understand not being able to hire someone now, but it would be good to find someone in the near future. Yes, you can get tips online but having someone watch you can make a big difference. You have to stop your pup from getting riled up BEFORE it happens. I break a hard stare by walking into my dog and turning them around. Might have to go around 2 or 2 times before my dog would look up at me as if to say, "what are we doing?" and then I reward for the eye contact. Then just keep going as if nothing happened. Take a big calm breath, don't tighten up on the leash or at least pull backwards (that just makes the dog want to go forward even more) and keep moving. Distance is your friend. If you can cross the street or stand off to the side while the other dog passes, it will help until your dog learns that he doesn't need to make a fuss.

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post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-14-2019, 01:12 PM
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One thing you can do is get a properly sized prong collar that has medium to smaller sized prongs, learn how to fit and put it on correctly and how to deliver a correction. You can use a friend who has a dog or just go where there is a dog in a fenced in area that your dog can see. Start a good distance from the other dog. Slowly heel toward the dog. The instant your dog makes any reaction, tell him "no" and "sit" and give him a correction. If he sits and stops reacting, praise and offer him a small bite of meat about the size of a small crouton. Then heel him a little closer and repeat. Keep gradually moving closer until you sense your dog is becoming too reactive and then back up some and repeat the process. Back up enough to where he seems pretty nonreactive, praise him up a lot, give the release command and take him back to the car or house offering a lot of praise and patting on his side. Over time, if this approach is going to work, you should notice he is less reactive at closer distances. Don't underestimate the time you will have to put into this training. Ideally, you want the other dog to be a dog that you know likes other dogs.
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post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-14-2019, 01:31 PM
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I understand being short on cash, and I think that you can teach a dog basic obedience on your own. I also think that even a few sessions with a professional trainer could really help if you are trying to manage aggression/reactivity issues. If you do look for a trainer, get one experienced with GSDs and/or other working breeds. I would ask on this forum or try to find a local IPO or GSD club.
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