What is the "out" command? - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #1 of 32 (permalink) Old 04-18-2016, 08:59 PM Thread Starter
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What is the "out" command?

I have taught Place, Leave It, Wait, Off, Go, Back and a lot of other words. I keep seeing people talking about an Out command and I have no idea what that is. How did I miss it? I wonder if it's the same behavior I've taught using a different command and why none of our trainers either private or in classes, ever use it.
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post #2 of 32 (permalink) Old 04-18-2016, 09:02 PM
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If you have something in your mouth spit it out. Could be a ball, could be a frisbee, could be a tug, could be a person.
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post #3 of 32 (permalink) Old 04-18-2016, 09:10 PM
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I use it for him to literally get out of something, such as out of the car, out of the closet, "lets go OUT" accompanied by me putting shoes on. When I just put the shoes on without "out", he knows it's tough sh!tsky he stays to guard the house and looks at me with betrayed look behind the glass door... it's heartbreaking.. lol. For things like that.
He also knows "out" to let something out of the mouth when we play (or it's something he shouldn't have) and I have my hand on the object to let it go.

"Leave" I use when he just goes for something out on walks, or get's distracted and stares at something. Just to shift his attention away from the object.

Maybe I'm doing it all wrong though.. haha. But it seems to me the most fitting commands for situations. I was worried a little at first that he may be confusing "out" with too many meanings, but he is pretty clever boy and definitely uses other cues to figure out what want him to do at the time.
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post #4 of 32 (permalink) Old 04-18-2016, 09:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baillif View Post
If you have something in your mouth spit it out. Could be a ball, could be a frisbee, could be a tug, could be a person.
This is the one most people are referring to.
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post #5 of 32 (permalink) Old 04-18-2016, 10:49 PM
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Yes, "out" means release what is in your mouth. Usually used with bite work as the command to let go of the sleeve, suit or person. Also, it can be used to release a ball, toy or what ever else is in the dog's mouth.

In German it is "aus", in Dutch it is "Los", the translation to english is "out."
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post #6 of 32 (permalink) Old 04-19-2016, 06:55 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baillif View Post
If you have something in your mouth spit it out. Could be a ball, could be a frisbee, could be a tug, could be a person.
Thank you.
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post #7 of 32 (permalink) Old 04-19-2016, 06:57 PM Thread Starter
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Yes, "out" means release what is in your mouth. Usually used with bite work as the command to let go of the sleeve, suit or person. Also, it can be used to release a ball, toy or what ever else is in the dog's mouth.

In German it is "aus", in Dutch it is "Los", the translation to english is "out."
That is simpler than Drop it. By the time I say that, he has already moved on to something else. I'm using Leave it when I want him to ignore or not pick something up. This makes more sense.
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post #8 of 32 (permalink) Old 04-19-2016, 07:18 PM
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I have a drop it for non sport stuff because out needs to happen instantly or its wrong. It's a non formal command I nag them for. I also just no and correct a dog for picking up stuff I never want them messing with or at least not messing with unless told otherwise. Rolls of toilet paper/shoes/clothing items/etc. There is no point in continuing to tell a dog to drop stuff they shouldn't be picking up in the first place. Just correct them for picking it up.
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post #9 of 32 (permalink) Old 04-19-2016, 07:24 PM Thread Starter
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I have a drop it for non sport stuff because out needs to happen instantly or its wrong. It's a non formal command I nag them for. I also just no and correct a dog for picking up stuff I never want them messing with or at least not messing with unless told otherwise. Rolls of toilet paper/shoes/clothing items/etc. There is no point in continuing to tell a dog to drop stuff they shouldn't be picking up in the first place. Just correct them for picking it up.
Good point. I've been using drop it for toys when I throw them in the yard. It's just for play. I use leave it when I want to pull away their attention in advance, but my older dog will drop anything for the leave it command. I'm not going to change commands for her. The puppy is just now learning. I rarely use No, because I save that for very important things. My negative marker word is uh-uh when they almost have something right but not quite. It means try again.

My biggest challenge is getting other people to use the words I use. I have used Ok for a release word, but I need to remember to use something else because people say Ok all the time in regular conversation and release my dog accidentally when I don't want to.
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post #10 of 32 (permalink) Old 04-19-2016, 09:33 PM
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I use the two balls on a rope game to teach the out from a pup. I use "out" to get the dogs to drop toys or "out" a bite. I teach it with toys and proof it with a person in a sleeve or suit. It's all the same thing to me.

I do use "leave it" if the dog is going to pick up something it shouldn't. I also use "leave it" if the dog is about to pick up a toy I just told it to out. In sport or work, I have no issues with my dogs cleanly outing a suit, sleeve or a "live bite" if the suspect is relatively compliant. But, I rarely out my dog off a suspect that is not compliant or still combative.

One funny thing that I noticed yesterday was Boru, my new dog who is KNOV titled and trained in Dutch, dropped his toy when I said "out." It is progress as he was toy possessive and handler aggressive. I have been using "Los" with him, but Dutch is my third dog training language. My other dogs have always been English and / or German. Tonight, Boru was bringing his toy back, dropping it on the "out" and calmly allowing me to pick it up and continue the game. Sounds silly and trivial, but it is progress. I still haven't gotten bit yet, not hard at least.

"My biggest challenge is getting other people to use the words I use. I have used Ok for a release word, but I need to remember to use something else because people say Ok all the time in regular conversation and release my dog accidentally when I don't want to."

I use "OK" for a release, I had to remove that word from my vocabulary when I am working with my dogs. My dogs will not listen to anyone else, so that is not a problem. Your dog should be released by anyone but you, except maybe a family member. Certainly, not friends or strangers.

“Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance”. George Bernard Shaw

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