Jumping up - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #1 of 120 (permalink) Old 02-16-2015, 08:45 PM Thread Starter
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Jumping up

Anybody got any advice on stopping dogs from jumping up? Whenever my husband or I comes home he goes crazy jumping up. I've tried ignoring him and that makes him jump more. I've also tried rewarding him when all four paws are grounded. That works for the time being but the next time coming in he goes right back to jumping like he's had no training at all. He jumps on my husband more than he jumps on me. If anybody has any suggestions or advice that has worked for you guys please let me know. Thanks in advance!!
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post #2 of 120 (permalink) Old 02-16-2015, 09:30 PM
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Most GSDs will have the "jumpies" when they first see their master(s) after an absence, either long or short. It's something that you get used to and actually come to enjoy as they're expressing their earnest delight to see you.

It's flattering. Enjoy it and engage in the fun with the dog rubbing him all over and squealing in delight just to see him again. It's a big part of the fun of owning a GSD.

But no one likes the jump up into your face deal. And, it's a bit dangerous, really, as the GSD nose is a battering ram in you face you surely don't need.

I'm sure you'll get some other comments in this thread, but, here's how we broker ours from jumping into our faces. Firstly, we would lightly knee the dog in the chest for jumping into our faces and also scold him with our command of displeasure. Then we'd turn away from him to deprive him of the joy of our company. Hey, it works.

But once in a while he still wants to jump in our faces. So, I've taken to crossing my arms at the wrist in front of me before he jumps (you'll come to understand his body language well enough to predict) and saying Nein (German for no). He then remembers how he shouldn't jump.

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post #3 of 120 (permalink) Old 02-16-2015, 09:34 PM
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With my Sting, the ignoring worked, but I had to turn my back. And yes, he would test it by jumping up again, only I ignored that also. When he learned that his jumping up would get no attention, he gradually stopped. It does help to work on an acceptable behavior. I taught Sting to come to my hand when it was held out and to sit. I had a treat in my hand which he got. That way when I saw that look that he was going to jump - I held out my hand - he came and sat and got a reward. I also had him sit before I opened the door and let him out - that helped him to learn to sit when I came home.


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post #4 of 120 (permalink) Old 02-16-2015, 09:49 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks. I'll try that. We have started setting him off for a toy but that only makes him want to play, which brings excitement and more jumping. I will for sure try having him sit and work for a treat.

I woudn't want to knee him. Hes so funny because when we turn our backs to him he thinks it's a game and runs around to meet us and jumps again. Lol yes the GSD nose to the face! Had that happen many times
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post #5 of 120 (permalink) Old 02-16-2015, 10:08 PM
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Try teaching the dog a down.......extended downs....running across the yard with the dog and teaching a down where the dog hits the dirt in an instant....something about a well obeyed down will lighten one's load so much in so many instances including the front door parties.....if you so choose. One must be honest to themselves regarding the reception they desire at the front door....faking it doesn't always fool the dog.


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post #6 of 120 (permalink) Old 02-17-2015, 09:25 AM Thread Starter
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Teachin him a down sounds great. We've tried just making him sit, but maybe a down would work better. He probably can sense I don't mind him jumping on me, but I cannot have him jumping up and being rude with guests, especially my four year old niece. So I prefer to not confuse him and just not allow him jumping at all.
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post #7 of 120 (permalink) Old 02-17-2015, 10:07 AM
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Teachin him a down sounds great. We've tried just making him sit, but maybe a down would work better. He probably can sense I don't mind him jumping on me, but I cannot have him jumping up and being rude with guests, especially my four year old niece. So I prefer to not confuse him and just not allow him jumping at all.

Agreed....no jumping at all ...especially at the front door when you come home or guests arrive. I used to have my dog on prong and lead when company would come over....or better yet I greeted them in the driveway with dog hooked up...seemed like the dog was less excited with the meet and greet in the driveway. That evolved to the inside of house....dog on down/stay and corrected the moment she budged....then when she got her act together..I allowed her up to scent the company but with only enough leash to keep it loose. I would put my foot on the leash on the floor with enough slack so it allowed her a proper posture and a tad more...if she jumped...she basically self corrected by running out slack in the leash...she figured it out soon enough....Yeah...I'm all for exuberant greetings with my dog when I come home but in the beginning, I had to forgo the event in order to create consistency with all guests.

Little humans getting mugged by a GSD when they come into your house is not the best way to go....however...when the nephews and nieces are told not to run away from the dog while screaming...in the backyard...and then persist to do it anyway....well...when the dog runs them down and gives them a hip check and puts them on the ground....I guess it's a " I told ya so" moment. A couple of my nephews and nieces actually think its fun getting herded like that, so I just thank them for being herding participants.....

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post #8 of 120 (permalink) Old 02-17-2015, 10:13 AM
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I read in Jan Fennel's book, the Dog Listener, to apply the 5 minute rule. That is, when you come in, ignore the dog for 5 minutes. Walk past, do not make eye contact, do not greet, speak or anything. Keep moving, make yourself a cup of tea. Then, when the dog has calmed down, call them to you. She explains it better than I can, but that the gist of it ... and it works.
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post #9 of 120 (permalink) Old 02-17-2015, 10:56 AM Thread Starter
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He does need time to calm down when we come home. It's kinda become a game for him because the best way to somewhat stop the jumping is to send him after a toy, which just creates excitement. So yeah the 5 minute rule would probably be a good one for him.

I guess reverting back to the leash when guest arrive would be a good option. I like the idea him correcting himself. Did you use the prong collar for that?
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post #10 of 120 (permalink) Old 02-17-2015, 11:09 AM
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I like the idea him correcting himself. Did you use the prong collar for that?

I did... don't know if one has to...I would put the collar on a bit different in that particular situation with the lead attachment clip off to the side and slightly downward angling since the direction of the correction would come from underneath rather than above in most all other situations.

The calming down approach worked on one of my previous GSDs ......it was and is my first approach with all 3 I have had. The problem I had with my current GSD was....even if I ignored her and turned from her and went about my business ...I still had a jumping GSD pup tagging along....so I employed the other tactics I mentioned.


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