Tight sit/down, sloppy sit/down - German Shepherd Dog Forums
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 6 (permalink) Old 12-14-2011, 11:43 AM Thread Starter
Elite Member
 
NewbieShepherdGirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Ames, Iowa
Posts: 1,840
Tight sit/down, sloppy sit/down

One of the things I'm going to work on over my Christmas break is to work obedience. Sasha is very good about sitting or downing when told to do so, but she is sooooo sloppy about it. Her back legs are everywhere but where they should be. For what we have been doing (just livin' the life of a pet) that worked just fine. However, we will (hopefully) begin training in January and I'd like us, in this year, to eventually get our CGC and our CD. I don't think (correct me if I'm wrong) it matters how they sit/down during the CGC, but it does when trialing for your CD, correct?

If I'm right then I guess my question is, would you recommend using a different word for a good, tight sit/down? I tried just now to only reward a tight sit/down after saying the word and Sasha was, understandably, confused. Another question is are there any rules as to what language you can use during trials? I know some of you use German, and I'm not real familiar with German, but am pretty comfortable using Russian commands. I could obviously learn the German words if that's necessary, but if they would allow Russian commands that would just be easier for me. If they have to be in English during the trials I guess we'll just work through the confusion; she's smart, she'll catch on.

~Sasha~{GSD}~ 3ish~Gotcha day January, 29, 2011
~Monte~{Golden Retriever}~ (RIP)~ 1997-2009

NewbieShepherdGirl is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 6 (permalink) Old 12-14-2011, 12:43 PM
Elite Member
 
Guardyan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,653
Crooked sits and downs will not matter during the CGC, but they can cost you alot of points when trialing for your CD.

I don't really use a different word for straight sits, but my body language does indicate to my dog when I expect them. For example, when we are out for a relaxed walk, my body language is relaxed. When we are doing formal heeling, I stand upright, hold my left hand against my side and give the cue "get ready". All of these cues indicate to my dog that we are "working", not just out for a neighborhood sniff.

You can use whichever language is comfortable for you in the ring. (I use a mixture of English and German.) Just be consistent and don't utilize phrases that can be misconstrued as double commands.

Are you familiar with training a tuck sit? This can be a good foundation exercise for young dogs.

PAM Guardyan's Gavin, VCD2, CDX, RE, AX, AXJ, AXP, AJP, TD
PACH Guardyan's Helki, CDX, PCDX, RA, MXP3, MXPB, MJP3, MJPB, CGCA
Guardyan's Kamikaze BN, CDX, RE, OAP, OJP
Guardyan's Kricket BN, CD, RN, NAP, OJP
Guardyan is offline  
post #3 of 6 (permalink) Old 12-14-2011, 12:48 PM Thread Starter
Elite Member
 
NewbieShepherdGirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Ames, Iowa
Posts: 1,840
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guardyan View Post
Crooked sits and downs will not matter during the CGC, but they can cost you alot of points when trialing for your CD.

I don't really use a different word for straight sits, but my body language does indicate to my dog when I expect them. For example, when we are out for a relaxed walk, my body language is relaxed. When we are doing formal heeling, I stand upright, hold my left hand against my side and give the cue "get ready". All of these cues indicate to my dog that we are "working", not just out for a neighborhood sniff.

You can use whichever language is comfortable for you in the ring. (I use a mixture of English and German.) Just be consistent and don't utilize phrases that can be misconstrued as double commands.

Are you familiar with training a tuck sit? This can be a good foundation exercise for young dogs.
Thanks for response. I am not familiar with any methods for training a tuck sit. This may be something I ask our trainer when we start. Right now the plan was just to use the methods taught in the purely positive training book in combination with the foundation I have already laid.

~Sasha~{GSD}~ 3ish~Gotcha day January, 29, 2011
~Monte~{Golden Retriever}~ (RIP)~ 1997-2009

NewbieShepherdGirl is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 6 (permalink) Old 12-14-2011, 12:59 PM
Elite Member
 
Guardyan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,653
The tuck sit is an important foundation skill for competitive obedience. Here is a video about teaching the tuck sit:

PuppyTrainingIntroFirstStage - YouTube

Have fun!!!

PAM Guardyan's Gavin, VCD2, CDX, RE, AX, AXJ, AXP, AJP, TD
PACH Guardyan's Helki, CDX, PCDX, RA, MXP3, MXPB, MJP3, MJPB, CGCA
Guardyan's Kamikaze BN, CDX, RE, OAP, OJP
Guardyan's Kricket BN, CD, RN, NAP, OJP
Guardyan is offline  
post #5 of 6 (permalink) Old 12-14-2011, 01:06 PM
Crowned Member
 
Freestep's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 6,117
Personally, I never worried about crooked or sloppy sits, as I could never figure out a way to train a tight sit without confusing the heck out of the dog. It might cost you a point or so in a trial, but you have to pick the hill you want to die on. I give lavish praise for a tight sit, but don't correct a goofy one. As for the sit when heeling, I do ask my dog to be in line with me. But I don't fret if she's sitting on one hip or whatever. I'm not looking for an OTCH.

It seems to me that a dog's conformation has more to do with tight sits than training does. Some dogs do it naturally, others don't, and it seems the more compact,shorter-coupled dogs have an easier time with it. My dog Justice was a big, long, rangy girl and she always used to sit sloppily; we got our CDX with no issues.
Freestep is offline  
post #6 of 6 (permalink) Old 12-14-2011, 01:18 PM Thread Starter
Elite Member
 
NewbieShepherdGirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Ames, Iowa
Posts: 1,840
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freestep View Post
Personally, I never worried about crooked or sloppy sits, as I could never figure out a way to train a tight sit without confusing the heck out of the dog. It might cost you a point or so in a trial, but you have to pick the hill you want to die on. I give lavish praise for a tight sit, but don't correct a goofy one. As for the sit when heeling, I do ask my dog to be in line with me. But I don't fret if she's sitting on one hip or whatever. I'm not looking for an OTCH.

It seems to me that a dog's conformation has more to do with tight sits than training does. Some dogs do it naturally, others don't, and it seems the more compact,shorter-coupled dogs have an easier time with it. My dog Justice was a big, long, rangy girl and she always used to sit sloppily; we got our CDX with no issues.
Very interesting information; thank you!

~Sasha~{GSD}~ 3ish~Gotcha day January, 29, 2011
~Monte~{Golden Retriever}~ (RIP)~ 1997-2009

NewbieShepherdGirl is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome