Confused on how to train puppy to not bite livestock/small pets - Page 2 - German Shepherd Dog Forums
 24Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-09-2019, 11:41 PM
New Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 12
I didn't realize the dog was only 10 weeks. I wouldn't ecollar a dog that young, I would just keep him away from animals if you are having problems.
zeyad likes this.
dbussan00 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-10-2019, 07:15 AM
Crowned Member
 
Jenny720's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 7,133
Long leads also help. You don’t want them to be super focused on any animal so you can start - “leave it “ helps teach to ignore something. A great command and can be found on you tube. We have lots of small animals in the house gunea pigs , bunny, a bird that is always loose supervised. We also have a chihuahua. A few of those animals brought home after my dogs were adults and then still had to learn to leave them alone. It is much easier when the pup/dogs are around these animals on a regular basis so you can show them want you want versus animals that they rarely see in your home. I don’t have any livestock. My friend owns ahorse barn their lab pup was on a long lead for many months and then put away in the house a few times a day. She was was a pup and was shown they were part of her daily routine. Now over a year old she has free reign of the barn -walks around and does not bother the horses as she was trained not to she is good friends with some of the horses.
NiabiTheGreat likes this.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Jenny720 is offline  
post #13 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-10-2019, 04:43 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 32
We have a high prey drive GSD living with a cat. It was a pain in the ass for a while but we started early with the leave it and no bite commands and stayed consistent with it regarding chasing our cat. She’ll occasionally still ‘follow’ the cat around but she doesn’t bite her and will back off if we tell her leave it. You’ll find very few people that will tell you to put an ecollar on a ten week old puppy. Be sure to reward generously for walking away at the leave it command!
CoffeeGirl is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #14 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-10-2019, 04:59 PM
Master Member
 
Chuck94!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Manhattan, KS & Overland Park, KS
Posts: 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by WIBackpacker View Post
Thereís no one correct way to raise a stockdog, but hereís one idea.

Iím just starting an 8 week old on manners and foundation. These pictures are terrible because itís raining right now and I propped up my iPhone on a boot, but anyway...

The 8 week old puppy (blue) is inside an expen while I work my adult dog (red) on ducks.

If the puppy is frantic and out of his mind, or is acting like heís in glazed over prey mode or barrier frustration, Iíd move myself and the stock farther away. But if he is not frantic and just watching, we stay at the same distance or get a bit closer.

The object is NOT to blast him with the fear of God and punishment and lightning bolts - but to have him grow accustomed to the sounds that the stock make when content, moving, afraid, eating, etc. I want him to be keen to work, but not frantic. Frantic/hectic dogs bite. You can do this with or without an adult dog. If I didnít have an adult dog I could trust to work calmly, Iíd drive the ducks around myself.

He is a LONG way away from his first actual exposure to livestock, and he has been nowhere near my goats. He will see sheep through a fence starting next week. But if heís frantic or hectic, Iíll move him away until he is older, then start again.

Donít rush it. You want to reward calm thinking.
I LOVE LOVE LOVE ex-pens! I have like 4 of them lol. They were life-saving when Rollo was younger

Rollo: Viking & 1st ruler of Normandy | D.O.B. | 11-27-2017
Chuck (me): |23 Years Old|
Chuck94! is online now  
post #15 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-10-2019, 05:12 PM
Administrator
 
WIBackpacker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 2,231
And OP, I think we talked about this in your previous thread, but this is SO important it needs repeating. You can either:

A. Raise the puppy with the intent of having the puppy work your goats or

B. Raise the puppy and teach it that goats are untouchable off limits. Never to be bothered or controlled. The way you’d teach cat manners or not to chase wildlife.

If you waver back and forth between A and B you will confuse the dog and introduce a lot of conflict. My post yesterday was aimed at someone who wants their puppy to work with the animals in the future. Straight up aversive/leave-it training is another matter.
WIBackpacker is offline  
post #16 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-10-2019, 06:01 PM
Crowned Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 4,395
Quote:
Originally Posted by WIBackpacker View Post
And OP, I think we talked about this in your previous thread, but this is SO important it needs repeating. You can either:

A. Raise the puppy with the intent of having the puppy work your goats or

B. Raise the puppy and teach it that goats are untouchable off limits. Never to be bothered or controlled. The way youíd teach cat manners or not to chase wildlife.

If you waver back and forth between A and B you will confuse the dog and introduce a lot of conflict. My post yesterday was aimed at someone who wants their puppy to work with the animals in the future. Straight up aversive/leave-it training is another matter.
Thats a good point. I know what I said wasn't very specific either way.

Doc

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Steve Strom is offline  
post #17 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-11-2019, 12:57 PM Thread Starter
New Member
 
NiabiTheGreat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by WIBackpacker View Post
And OP, I think we talked about this in your previous thread, but this is SO important it needs repeating. You can either:

A. Raise the puppy with the intent of having the puppy work your goats or

B. Raise the puppy and teach it that goats are untouchable off limits. Never to be bothered or controlled. The way youíd teach cat manners or not to chase wildlife.

If you waver back and forth between A and B you will confuse the dog and introduce a lot of conflict. My post yesterday was aimed at someone who wants their puppy to work with the animals in the future. Straight up aversive/leave-it training is another matter.

Yep, we did! As in that thread, I would MUCH prefer him to just ignore everything. Goats, sheep, cattle, cats, rabbit, chickens, emus, etc. I have yet to bring everything else into the picture, and goats are my main livestock around here so I think they would be best to teach him with. I have discouraged any and all chasing and herding behaviors and he is actually doing pretty well. He is 100% fine if they are standing still and not moving, but as soon as they move, he goes forwards, they run and he wants to chase.

He is actually really good with "leave-it" It works for treats and toys. But as soon as an animal is introduced he goes full-on play mode and ignores almost all commands.


I did have a bit of a breakthrough though. I tired him out with play. Walked way up into the middle of the pasture with the goats and just sat there. He was completely tired out. I let the goats in and pretty soon we were completely surrounded. He watched them eat, dig, fight, play/jump, for several minutes before he fell asleep. Once he woke up I simply stood and we walked out. He got 2 feet of several on the way out and he completely ignored them. I think that was definitely a step in the right direction. Before, I won't lie. He was super hyper to get into the pasture. I would wait for him to calm a bit, but he was definitely still wound up when I took him in and that was my mistake. I think that may have amped him up so he thought all the goats were playmates/toys.
NiabiTheGreat is offline  
post #18 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-11-2019, 01:05 PM
Administrator
 
WIBackpacker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 2,231
Okay that makes sense. For that end goal, I'd control his exposure to them when he is so little. Once he's older, I'd correct for the behaviors that lead up to chasing - eyeing, freezing up, the tail straight in the air that means "I'm about to launch", all of those body signals. By the time the dog is already in motion, he might be seeing the whole picture through a glazed prey-haze, if you will. Much harder to get his attention once it's already happening.

Everything that helps reinforce impulse control is your friend. Throw a ball but dog has to wait for a release word, wait at every door, wait at every gate.

I taught my last dog she had to literally lie down at every door and gate. She was (is) a rocket fast dog and I wanted to make sure she was thinking and her brain was collected before she entered an area that might or might not have animals in it. Whether it's a pen with goats or a garage with my shopcats. Dog has to lie down at every exterior threshold, basically (but not rooms in a house or anything like that). Once she was fully grown up and reliable, I let the criteria fade, but she still checks in with me mentally when she goes through gates, which I want.

An automatic down at every gate can be a life saver, literally. It takes patience and is tedious when they're little, but it's worth it.
NiabiTheGreat likes this.
WIBackpacker is offline  
post #19 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-11-2019, 01:10 PM Thread Starter
New Member
 
NiabiTheGreat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenny720 View Post
Long leads also help. You donít want them to be super focused on any animal so you can start - ďleave it ď helps teach to ignore something. A great command and can be found on you tube. We have lots of small animals in the house gunea pigs , bunny, a bird that is always loose supervised. We also have a chihuahua. A few of those animals brought home after my dogs were adults and then still had to learn to leave them alone. It is much easier when the pup/dogs are around these animals on a regular basis so you can show them want you want versus animals that they rarely see in your home. I donít have any livestock. My friend owns ahorse barn their lab pup was on a long lead for many months and then put away in the house a few times a day. She was was a pup and was shown they were part of her daily routine. Now over a year old she has free reign of the barn -walks around and does not bother the horses as she was trained not to she is good friends with some of the horses.

That is exactly what I hope he can do when he is older! He obviously wont be left unattended with anything. But i want him to be able to come outside while I feed, water, move, fix fences, etc.

My sister had LGDs when we were younger and they were just like that. Now, obviously that is what they are bred for, but they still had to be trained, and I had the livestock so I would be the one training. With LGDs the rule is to introduce them as young as possible. Maybe I am moving too fast with Arthur. LGDs are meant to live their whole lives with livestock/poultry. I have never owned a dog, worked with loads of them, yeah, but he's mine(Still can't get over how awesome, and tiring it is!) and I think I may be too focused to make him "Perfect" with everyone and everything and wanting to get everything right, when even I know there is no such thing as a perfect person or dog. And he is just a puppy! I definitely think I may have been expecting too much of him too quickly.

Reading the replies kinda got me back to my original mindset. And in just one day it is already proving to be better than me trying to rush him to be perfect. I even let the kittens out a few minutes ago and not once did he try and grab them. That has never happened before. I'll need to try and get a few pics. It was awesome!
NiabiTheGreat is offline  
post #20 of 20 (permalink) Old 09-11-2019, 01:13 PM
Administrator
 
WIBackpacker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 2,231
Quote:
Originally Posted by NiabiTheGreat View Post
With LGDs the rule is to introduce them as young as possible. Maybe I am moving too fast with Arthur. LGDs are meant to live their whole lives with livestock/poultry. I have never owned a dog, worked with loads of them, yeah, but he's mine(Still can't get over how awesome, and tiring it is!) and I think I may be too focused to make him "Perfect" with everyone and everything and wanting to get everything right, when even I know there is no such thing as a perfect person or dog. And he is just a puppy! I definitely think I may have been expecting too much of him too quickly.

Reading the replies kinda got me back to my original mindset. And in just one day it is already proving to be better than me trying to rush him to be perfect. I even let the kittens out a few minutes ago and not once did he try and grab them. That has never happened before. I'll need to try and get a few pics. It was awesome!
Cheers to a long happy friendship with Arthur, puppies are awesome.
WIBackpacker is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome