Jumping! - German Shepherd Dog Forums
 5Likes
  • 2 Post By Castlemaid
  • 1 Post By SuperG
  • 1 Post By wolfy dog
  • 1 Post By Jpage24.87
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-11-2018, 10:55 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
GreenMountain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 56
Jumping!

I'm a first time GSD puppy owner and this puppy was kind of sprung upon me two weeks ago so I'm trying to learn everything I can about the breed and different puppy training techniques, etc.

He is 3 months old and he is a jumper. He jumps to put his paws on the counters, on the table, on me, on the kids, on the puppy gate, on the couch...

I've read and watched YouTube videos and I still feel like I'm not 100% clear on what I should do.

The whole "no touching, no talking, no looking at them" seems to be a good approach when he jumps on me. I've read that you should take a step into their space so that they don't feel like they can jump on you. Is this the best method for when he jumps on me or should I be doing something else?

Also, on the counters and the couch... I can't exactly ignore that behavior and just let him do it. I've put all sources of food completely off the counter. There's nothing for him there. I watched a YT video where a woman says OFF then lures the puppy to a sitting position with a treat. I tried this and my puppy seems to think it's a game. Maybe I'm making it a game without realizing! I tell him OFF, he notices the treat in my hand, then sits. Then ten seconds later he's back on the counter.

When I was cooking dinner yesterday (lately when I cook I've been letting him out in the yard and having my kids play with him- none of them realize that their playing is actually helping me stay sane LOL) but yesterday, I put one of his beds in a corner of the kitchen and when he came over to me(he didn't didn't jump!) I tossed a piece of dog food into his bed. He'd get it, sit there and lay down... then get up and we'd do it again but he gradually laid there for longer! So why is cooking easier than getting a glass of water?(or something else not exciting which is when he jumps like crazy on the counter!)

So... what is the best approach for jumping (specifically on counters, the couch, etc.) He never tries to jump all the way up. Just his front paws. Any advice for what's worked? Thank you!
GreenMountain is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-11-2018, 12:51 PM
The Administrator from the Great White North, eh?
 
Castlemaid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Northern British Columbia
Posts: 16,991
Normal behaviour, just curious about everything and wants to be included.

The issue about all the tips you have seen and heard about, is that it still allows the puppy to jump first - then something happens, either good or bad, but it is not stopping or preventing the jumping. We have to be smarter and faster then they are, and reward them for not jumping - more than trying to change their focus and behaviour after they have already jumped up.

A lot of puppy training is managing your puppy to do what you want, setting them up to be successful, and rewarding their good behaviour choices, more than trying to stop a behaviour that has already occured. A behaviour that is suppressed over and over again will be extinguished naturally.

First thing, is watch your pup - you sorta know what is going to happen, be ready for it, and stop it before it happens with a sit command, with a game of running after a treat, or some other replacement behaviour. Much easier to teach a puppy to do something, than NOT do something. Puppies don't really have the mental discipline to fill in a blank space with something other than what they were doing naturally and instinctively (like jumping, putting a paw up on the counter to see what is going on, etc.)

You have to think ahead, and manage your pup to do what you want, but make it look like it was his idea. Always have treats on you to reward and re-inforce the behaviour your want. The more he gets to practice bad behaviours, the harder it will be to extinguish them.

When puppy comes to you, sit! Reward! Be quick and lure him to prevent the jumping. If he jumps, I would step back a couple of feet and lure him in to you and into a sit so that you have set him up to succeed, and reward that. Puppy is lying quietly on his bed, walk up to him, praise and drop a treat on the floor by his nose so he gets rewarded for being calm and quiet.

You walk into the kitchen and the little tornado is at your heels, eyes on the counter - you know what he is thinking of doing, be a step ahead of him, be ready. Stop, call him, reward him for sitting, or throw a treat to his bed like you do, or just have him come to you and reward that. Have a short length of leashon him, maybe a foot or so, and if he is sitting nicely by the counter and starts to stretch up to put his paw up, just gently pull him down to the ground with an "eh-eh!", ask him to sit, and reward him.

Or walk around dropping treats randomly - puppy will be looking at the floor, not you. Puppy will be more interested in staying down, because that is where all the treats end up.

Another thing you can do to prevent the jumping that may occur in specific situations and places, is mix up your routine and work on obedience exercises to associate certain things with listening and working with you, as opposed to jumping and going nuts.

Sometimes, when people with puppies ask me about how to stop puppy from: stealing things, jumping, rushing out the door, etc, and I explain the system of managing puppy, and rewarding small steps in the right direction, and always watching the pup and being ready to step in and set up the puppy for success instead of allowing the puppy to practice unwanted behaviours, they exclaim: "But that is too much work!". Yup!!! A full time job on top of everything you do in a day, but this will so pay off in the long term. I usually think of it not as controlling or training, but interacting with my pup, and forming wanted behavioural patterns, and that is so much more fun and rewarding than being constantly, and for years and years, at war with your dog.

Lucia


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
2009-2018

Keeta BH, OB1, TR1, AD
Rottweiler/Hairy Dog mix?? 2004-2015

Last edited by Castlemaid; 03-12-2018 at 12:09 AM. Reason: Fixed typos and spelling mistakes.
Castlemaid is offline  
post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-11-2018, 09:55 PM
Crowned Member
 
SuperG's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Great White North
Posts: 4,477
You might try tethering the dog to you and use your foot when required ..... making any jumping impossible.....praise and reward when appropriate...otherwise...let the behavior extinguish itself per the will of the dog.

SuperG
dogbyte likes this.

Hündin 32CACT, 2334CSAT, 2016 GAA 2.85
SuperG is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-12-2018, 01:09 AM
Crowned Member
 
wolfy dog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 9,322
The whole "no touching, no talking, no looking at them" seems to be a good approach when he jumps on me. I've read that you should take a step into their space so that they don't feel like they can jump on you. Is this the best method for when he jumps on me or should I be doing something else?
I step just outside his space (step away from him) and walk on so he ends up back on the floor with his front feet. Works great with this pup.(he is 11 weeks)
Also, on the counters and the couch... I can't exactly ignore that behavior and just let him do it. I've put all sources of food completely off the counter. There's nothing for him there. I watched a YT video where a woman says OFF then lures the puppy to a sitting position with a treat. I tried this and my puppy seems to think it's a game. Maybe I'm making it a game without realizing! I tell him OFF, he notices the treat in my hand, then sits. Then ten seconds later he's back on the counter.
So, ignore him. As long as he cannot find anything, it wil get boring. Griff does this too sometimes but since he never had success and I don' t respond, he hardly does it anymore.

And crate him when you cannot supervise him or whenever you are tired of him because we all get tired of our cute pups once in a while, at least I do. Make your life easier.
car2ner likes this.

Last edited by wolfy dog; 03-12-2018 at 01:14 AM.
wolfy dog is offline  
post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-12-2018, 01:13 AM
New Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 17
Mine is the same way. He jumps on anyone who walks through the door. Struggling to break this habit.
Tannerc13 is offline  
post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-12-2018, 05:25 AM
Senior Member
 
andywhite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 246
First thing my girl learned was "sit", second was "no".

"No" makes our life sooooo much easier! You can apply it every single day (with GSD puppy more like every single 5 minutes) to anything. Digging, pulling things, jumping, bitting, putting nose into stuff.....everything. But it only works, because she really understands "no" . It's not just random thing I'm screaming at her. She knows what it means and she respects that.

What about teaching your dog "no" too?
andywhite is offline  
post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-12-2018, 07:41 AM
Moderator
 
car2ner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Maryland
Posts: 4,153
for jumping on me, I found that you have to use different strategies with different dogs. What worked for my Samantha didn't work at all for my Bailey and I needed still a different strategy with my big-boy. For him I put pressure on him by walking forward toward him forcing him to back up. if he backed up and put his little furry bottom on the floor I took a step back releasing the pressure. But this would not have worked for my Sam or my Bailey. For Sam, who was full grown when I got her, holding her paws in the air just a bit longer than she like worked. For my Bailey, not looking at her until she sat quietly did the trick.

For counters, I totally agree with making that space as boring as possible. I make the "get down" as much as a non event as possible. I just usually use a look and a hip bump. I also use a "yummy spot". I chose a spot out of the way. If my dogs sit there patiently the MIGHT get a reward. It is the only spot that they will get a treat while I am in the kitchen. To teach the concept they might get a few tidbits when they sit there. Over months, the treat, treat, treat slows down to a trickle. I will say that when they sit there with the "look , I am here being good" face on it is hard not to treat. They are training me well. But also remember to take into account the calories if you are training with treats.

about.me/car2ner
Patton CGC BH
Chief fetch fanatic

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

car2ner is offline  
post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-12-2018, 11:02 AM
Crowned Member
 
wolfy dog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 9,322
Quote:
Originally Posted by car2ner View Post
I will say that when they sit there with the "look , I am here being good" face on it is hard not to treat. They are training me well. But also remember to take into account the calories if you are training with treats.
Griff, at the ripe old age of 11 weeks and after only one week here (!!!), pulled off that one while I was cooking. From the corner of my eyes I saw that he had offered several downs in various locations but the reward took too long evidently. So he came up to me, gently (no biting even) he nudged my leg, I looked and he immediately lied down with the anticipating look of having deserved a well-earned treat. I honestly laughed out loud and yes, gave him that treat, cause he was irresistible.
He is eerily smart and quick so I am sure I'll be asking questions here in the near future as he is growing up.
wolfy dog is offline  
post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-12-2018, 11:33 AM
Senior Member
 
Jpage24.87's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by andywhite View Post
First thing my girl learned was "sit", second was "no".

"No" makes our life sooooo much easier! You can apply it every single day (with GSD puppy more like every single 5 minutes) to anything. Digging, pulling things, jumping, bitting, putting nose into stuff.....everything. But it only works, because she really understands "no" . It's not just random thing I'm screaming at her. She knows what it means and she respects that.

What about teaching your dog "no" too?
"No", is by far the best thing I've taught a dog, because it literally applies to everything! It takes some time to get the meaning to sink in though. I usually say "no" and as soon as they stop doing whatever it is I don't want them doing, or redirect their focus to me, I reward.
andywhite likes this.
Jpage24.87 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome