Difficult Puppy - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #1 of 25 (permalink) Old 02-07-2018, 06:09 PM Thread Starter
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Difficult Puppy

My adult daughter bought a german shepherd puppy from a questionable breeder. Puppy had roundworms, and then caught parvo from our new dog.

Anyways, we are crate training him, he never lets us know he has to go until he has gone pee so much that when he scratches at the crate door pee is getting all over our floor. Same with poop, he will poop and then walk in it and lay in it, heck he will even eat it. In fact, today he ate it, then threw up and then ate THAT.

It's frustrating because he refuses to go outside most of the time. He will claw at the door to come in so he can poop in our dining room and pee in the living room. Even when he does go outside, when he goes back in his crate he will soil it...multiple times without warning. He loves pushing the potty pads to the back of the crate so that all the poo and pee can get straight on the bottom. It is very disheartening. I am a stay at home mom to a baby, toddler, and tween. I do not have time to bathe him, and clean his crate multiple times a day, in addition to potty training our own dog!

I'm addition this puppy is nipping everyone, and drew blood on my tween daughter. We are using Apple cider vinegar/water spray on him. It makes him stop...for a little bit. Is all this behavior normal? He seems kinda touched, I mean I understand mistakes, but it's constant. I'm cleaning poop and pee off my floors every day multiple times and then the crate multiple times as well.

Tia!
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post #2 of 25 (permalink) Old 02-07-2018, 06:25 PM
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I find all puppies difficult, so your puppy is normal. People can comment on worms, but it can be normal in a puppy and is easily treatable. I also had a puppy with parvo. It didn't affect his crate training. How old is your puppy? All my puppies were housebroken and crate trained by 12 weeks with consistent training. At 12 weeks they were letting me know they had to go potty by sitting at the backdoor.

But as a puppy, you should not be waiting for the puppy to let you know he has to go potty. He may not know until he's going...lol. You have to anticipate it by taking him out every half hour to an hour in the beginning and then praising him when he goes potty outside. You need to anticipate that he'll need to go potty after he wakes up, after he eats, after play time, before bed, etc.

When you say he claws to get inside, is anyone outside with him or are you just letting him out and letting him back in? Why does he refuse to go outside? He is outside alone? GSD puppies don't like to be alone. They want to be with their pack. You should be outside with him so he can be rewarded when he goes potty. If you let him out and he doesn't go after 10-15 minutes, put him back in the crate and try again in 10 minutes or a half hour. Don't give him the opportunity to go inside his crate.

If he's going to the bathroom in the house, how is that happening? Do you see him going potty inside? If you so, you say "no" and you scoop him up and deposit him outside to go so he knows and the praise him to the high heavens. He shouldn't be without supervision if he's out of the crate inside. You need to be able to catch him in the act and redirect to the right location for you to stop this behavior.

Oh, and if my adult child brought home a puppy for me to take care of (with everything else you said was on your plate), we'd be having words. This is your daughter's responsibility. If she can't train and teach the puppy, she should not have one. Sorry if that's harsh, but that would tick me off.

Last edited by IllinoisNative; 02-07-2018 at 06:30 PM.
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post #3 of 25 (permalink) Old 02-07-2018, 06:38 PM
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You should probably find him new home. Sounds like you have a lot going on and really no desire to have this puppy.




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post #4 of 25 (permalink) Old 02-07-2018, 06:39 PM
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Sounds like your plate may be too full right now to deal with a puppy, why is the adult daughter not caring for him?

You can not let a puppy outside alone and expect it to go. you need to take him out a lot, and make sure he is going. There will be lots of distractions for him and he may forget to go while in the middle of investigating new smells. Plus they have small bladders and poor muscle control of them when young, just like toddlers they don't always know they have to go until it is to late. You need to take him out at night before he goes in his crate, even if that means setting an alarm for every 2 hours.

Nipping is normal for all puppies, they explore and play with their mouths.

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post #5 of 25 (permalink) Old 02-07-2018, 06:40 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by IllinoisNative View Post
I find all puppies difficult, so your puppy is normal. [IMG class=inlineimg]https://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/images/smilies/smile.gif[/IMG] People can comment on worms, but it can be normal in a puppy and is easily treatable. I also had a puppy with parvo. It didn't affect his crate training. How old is your puppy? All my puppies were housebroken and crate trained by 12 weeks with consistent training. At 12 weeks they were letting me know they had to go potty by sitting at the backdoor.

But as a puppy, you should not be waiting for the puppy to let you know he has to go potty. He may not know until he's going...lol. You have to anticipate it by taking him out every half hour to an hour in the beginning and then praising him when he goes potty outside. You need to anticipate that he'll need to go potty after he wakes up, after he eats, after play time, before bed, etc.

When you say he claws to get inside, is anyone outside with him or are you just letting him out and letting him back in? Why does he refuse to go outside? He is outside alone? GSD puppies don't like to be alone. They want to be with their pack. You should be outside with him so he can be rewarded when he goes potty. If you let him out and he doesn't go after 10-15 minutes, put him back in the crate and try again in 10 minutes or a half hour. Don't give him the opportunity to go inside his crate.

If he's going to the bathroom in the house, how is that happening? Do you see him going potty inside? If you so, you say "no" and you scoop him up and deposit him outside to go so he knows and the praise him to the high heavens. He shouldn't be without supervision if he's out of the crate inside. You need to be able to catch him in the act and redirect to the right location for you to stop this behavior
He is 10 weeks old. We take him out every 2 hours, and someone is always with him. But it seems he prefers to do his business indoors.

When he is out of his crate we are playing with him, but he will pee/poo out of nowhere without any signs (sniffing, circling etc.). However sometimes he runs off to poo, and by the time one of us has caught up to him, it's too late. My daughter tried to startle him once and even picked him up to take him out and he simply continued to go.

There is no rythme or reason with this dog. Sometimes he even poos or pees on our mini schnauzers indoor potty..But we think he does it to drive our puppy up the wall.

Compared to our 10 week old puppy, he just seems wild and untrainable. Of course they are different breeds. We are all first time dog owners so this is all new and VERY stressful. There is contradictory advice all over the internet about potty training and crate training. ?
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post #6 of 25 (permalink) Old 02-07-2018, 06:43 PM
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Sounds like a whole lot of human error. Too bad the pup has to be the one forced to defecate in his own crate then trek through it just to beg to get out.
Either tell your daughter "I am assuming she is grown and not the tween" to take responsibility for her pup. Or rehome the dog to someplace it can be properly cared for.

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post #7 of 25 (permalink) Old 02-07-2018, 06:47 PM
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There is no rythme or reason with this dog. Sometimes he even poos or pees on our mini schnauzers indoor potty..But we think he does it to drive our puppy up the wall.
NO, he does not. He does it there because that is where the smell is. How do you think a dog is going to know that spot is restricted to him? It's where he thinks he is supposed to go because that's what the smell tells him!




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post #8 of 25 (permalink) Old 02-07-2018, 07:00 PM
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He is 10 weeks old. We take him out every 2 hours, and someone is always with him. But it seems he prefers to do his business indoors.
He may need to go out more often. I had one puppy that had to go every hour. They just lack bladder control at that age. It's a lot like having a newborn. I'm not going to lie, the first few months are rough. I would literally sleep on the couch by the back door and let my puppy out every 2 hours at night. Sometimes as soon as I heard them stir to prevent the habit of whining. During the day, I let them out more frequently. It's going to depend on their bladder control, how much water they drink, how often they play, etc. If he's still going inside after letting him out every two hours, I would start letting him out every half hour to hour. And I would stay outside until he went potty. Or I'd put him in is crate if he doesn't go potty within 10-15 minutes and repeat in another 10-15 minutes.

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When he is out of his crate we are playing with him, but he will pee/poo out of nowhere without any signs (sniffing, circling etc.). However sometimes he runs off to poo, and by the time one of us has caught up to him, it's too late. My daughter tried to startle him once and even picked him up to take him out and he simply continued to go.
They will continue to go when you pick them up because they don't have the bladder control yet to stop mid stream...lol. If he's running off to pee by himself and you haven't caught up to him yet, he's being given too much freedom in the house. That's why I would anticipate him needing to go potty before it happens. If you take him out every half hour during the day, he's bound to eventually go outside. You can also tether the puppy to you so you can redirect him immediately.

Quote:
There is no rythme or reason with this dog. Sometimes he even poos or pees on our mini schnauzers indoor potty..But we think he does it to drive our puppy up the wall.
LOL! Puppies don't try to intentionally drive anyone up the wall. They just do. It's part of their charm. It really is like having a newborn baby. He's only been alive 10 weeks. You have to teach him what to expect. Get rid of the smell with an enzyme cleaner (ie, Nature's Miracle) so he doesn't keep going in the same spot. At this point, he may not know it's bad to go in the house because he's not being redirected properly. And if you come own on him harshly for a basic biological need, you're going to make him go to the bathroom behind your back.

Also, you can't have an indoor potty for one dog and expect another dog not to use it when that is where they smell the urine/feces. I'm not a fan of pee pads for dogs unless you're in a high-rise. I don't like getting a dog used to going potty inside.

Quote:
Compared to our 10 week old puppy, he just seems wild and untrainable. Of course they are different breeds. We are all first time dog owners so this is all new and VERY stressful. There is contradictory advice all over the internet about potty training and crate training. ?
It certainly sounds stressful because of your other responsibilities and it's not your puppy. It's your daughters. The bulk of this responsibility should fall on her. It's not fair to dump it on you when you have your own dog to train. GSD are ridiculously smart, and they do want works. But they are also a mouthy, nippy breed that needs to be taught what is acceptable. What works for one puppy may not work for another so you're going to get different advice. But most of the advice on this board is good and it's specifically for this breed.

Good luck!
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Last edited by IllinoisNative; 02-07-2018 at 07:07 PM.
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post #9 of 25 (permalink) Old 02-07-2018, 07:47 PM
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You have an indoor potty and you have pee pads (typically treated with an attractant) in his crate... of course he thinks indoors is where potty time is suppose to happen.
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post #10 of 25 (permalink) Old 02-07-2018, 08:03 PM
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I know it is winter so it is a bit harder, I'm also not sure where you are located so it might not be as snowy. Playing with him will make him have to go. My last dog had this issue when we would play with her in the house (as a pup). Try playing with him outside or make sure you walk him and he goes outside before playing with him indoors. Mine would stop play and just pee on the floor when she was smaller so we had to make sure we ran with her and played with her a bit outside to make sure she went in the yard and then we would play with her indoors but also keep an eye. He won't give a lot of clues as to when he's going to go but he'll get the hang of it. Also clean the crate with something that will get rid of that smell in it. Just because we can't smell it doesn't mean he can't. Good luck!
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