Help with potty training - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-17-2017, 10:23 AM Thread Starter
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Help with potty training

I have a 3 month old female. I have had her since 8 weeks we have been trying our hardest to be consistent with her potty training. But what are we doing wrong we give alot of praise and treats as well as have a designated restroom area 10 feet by 4 ft for her to use the rest room. We take her out every two hours with exception of around 12 am to 6 am. The night time isn't the problem she is kept in her crate witch is the biggest we can find. We try taking her straight from the crate to the outside area. The problem is she does not at all poo in her crate but even half an hour after coming back in every once in a while she will pee in her crate. Outside her crate she goes anywhere and anytime and when it happens we rush her outside and praise her when she is done. Am I doing something wrong or is it simply to little time to get training down pat, or maybe she is to young. Any insight will be a big help thanks .
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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-17-2017, 08:07 PM
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From your post, I think that the crate is too big. For potty training, a small crate where she can't move around too much and find a potty area, encourages her to learn bladder control. Since your crate is big, you can make it smaller by adding boxes. Also to encourage her to go in the designated area, be sure to clean up her accidents when she can't see you and use an enzyme cleaner so she can't smell the area she had an accident and go back to it. If you can't find an enzyme cleaner a 50/50 solution of vinegar and water can also be used. Sometimes it helps to put a rag containing her urine in the area where you want her to potty. That's great you are taking her out on schedule but also be sure that her meals are on schedule. Also since your post mentioned that you are taking her out every 2 hours, and if she is out of the crate all that time and active, moving around, playing, that could be why she is having the accidents. Play with her for a time, but then put her back in her crate, and since your post mentioned that she sometimes pees in there - take her out after 10-15 minutes to her potty area. It also helps to give her enough time to potty and also encourage her to run (chasing after a ball) to get her bladder going. I didn't praise very much or give treats, I kept it low-keyed, though I have read that praise & treats works for others, but for an accident I did say a sharp NO and took the puppy outside and firmly said "go here".


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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-17-2017, 11:07 PM Thread Starter
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I did read that you should start with small crates but it was my first gsd wasn't sure on the growth rate so I got the all stages crate. And I always take her out to her potty area when I clean but I just use lysol spray and moist towels so she doesn't see me clean it. The feeding schedule is something I'm working on once twice a day a mix of wet and dry in the morning and dry later on at night both around 6am/pm so she can hold it from let's say 1230am to 6am when I wake up take her out and feed her it's times in the day she is a little more accident prone.
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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-18-2017, 07:40 PM
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That's great she is doing well at night but then she is all tired out and sleeping. But the accidents are happening during the day when she is active. She may not be always able to hold it during the 2 hour period especially if she has been playing and running around and drinking water. It may be helpful if you tried to take her out for a walk and potty after she has been active inside.


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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-20-2017, 04:39 AM Thread Starter
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Is 4 months to early to keep her out of her crate. I have a spare room and I want to use it for her in the day. I probably have to take her out alot more often, till she gets used to the bigger room, but I also worry about her being destructive because right now her crate is in our bedroom. She constantly sees us even when we are asleep I worry about leaving her in the room over night by herself. I do plan on taking everything out, except her crate and toys, and maybe a doggy bed. I am worried about her going hay wire with out the super vision.
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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-20-2017, 05:19 AM
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Have you noticed whether she has a particular schedule? What I'd recommend doing is trying to look for patterns in her behaviour and anticipating when she's going to go.

If she's used to seeing you all the time, it's likely that at least at first they'll be some "fighting" if you leave her by herself. For example, our dog Nix is used to having access to us almost all the time, except when we're in the bathroom. So, what usually happens is that she has no problem waiting outside the bathroom, but when there's a door closed that usually isn't (and one of us is inside the room), she'll jump, cry and try to open the door. Depending on how excited she is, it'll last for a longer or shorter time, but most of the time she calms down pretty quickly. What you could do is try to leave her in the room for small periods of time at first, and associate the room with something good.

I cannot advise you regarding crates because we haven't got one. We've always allowed Nix to roam freely around most of the house (it's quite small), but if I remember correctly when we were potty training her I always tried to keep her under my field of view.
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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-20-2017, 05:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HERNAMEISRUKA View Post
Is 4 months to early to keep her out of her crate. I have a spare room and I want to use it for her in the day. I probably have to take her out alot more often, till she gets used to the bigger room, but I also worry about her being destructive because right now her crate is in our bedroom. She constantly sees us even when we are asleep I worry about leaving her in the room over night by herself. I do plan on taking everything out, except her crate and toys, and maybe a doggy bed. I am worried about her going hay wire with out the super vision.
My guy is 8 months old - I wouldn't trust him alone in the house yet without supervision... sometimes even when we are sitting right next to him he still tries to chew the couch. It will depend on the dog tho.
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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-20-2017, 07:36 AM Thread Starter
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Have you noticed whether she has a particular schedule? What I'd recommend doing is trying to look for patterns in her behaviour and anticipating when she's going to go.

If she's used to seeing you all the time, it's likely that at least at first they'll be some "fighting" if you leave her by herself. For example, our dog Nix is used to having access to us almost all the time, except when we're in the bathroom. So, what usually happens is that she has no problem waiting outside the bathroom, but when there's a door closed that usually isn't (and one of us is inside the room), she'll jump, cry and try to open the door. Depending on how excited she is, it'll last for a longer or shorter time, but most of the time she calms down pretty quickly. What you could do is try to leave her in the room for small periods of time at first, and associate the room with something good.

I cannot advise you regarding crates because we haven't got one. We've always allowed Nix to roam freely around most of the house (it's quite small), but if I remember correctly when we were potty training her I always tried to keep her under my field of view.
How old is Nix now. I only ask because from what I have read is you need to expand the area the dog I guess in a sense calls its territory due to the fact they wont use the restroom where they sleep its a standard size bedroom. Soon to be with no furniture except puppy essentials. I am not sure with how she acts when we aren't around seeing as I have a family member at my house when me and my wife are working or away. When she is hungry she gets pretty destructive with things like her water and food bowl, but we do not feed her because we are trying to keep her schedule. We do however take her outside for some play time. I did notice however when she is in her area she is either looking for us if we run in the house or laying down hiding in a sense waiting for us. For example if we put her down to use the restroom and go inside to get something or fix her food bowl by the time we come out she is hanging on the pet fence we use to block her area. As well as if we are not watching her and she poos she will eat it if we are near her she will do her business and walk away. We want her to be a house dog so we eventually want to give her some freedom to walk around the house at a later age, we just would rather do it slowly like maybe instead of giving her the whole room buy a pen and make her use that for a while. If that also seems like a good plan. our goal is to get her used to the whole house in small doses instead of trying to let her out and walk around and stuff.
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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-20-2017, 07:38 AM Thread Starter
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My guy is 8 months old - I wouldn't trust him alone in the house yet without supervision... sometimes even when we are sitting right next to him he still tries to chew the couch. It will depend on the dog tho.
If she is really excited for example if we are sitting near her crate she will bite at her cage or jump around a bit. Also if she is hungry she will throw her food bowl around and stuff like that.
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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 07-21-2017, 05:53 AM
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How old is Nix now. I only ask because from what I have read is you need to expand the area the dog I guess in a sense calls its territory due to the fact they wont use the restroom where they sleep its a standard size bedroom.
She's 16 months old right now, and she came to live with us when she was 4.5 months old. However, from the very start she had access to almost the whole house. We have about 110 m2 in total, divided in three floors. She had access to the ground and first floors. However, for the first two or three days she didn't know how to climb the stairs, so she was restricted to 40 m2 at at time. She'd be downstairs during the day and upstairs with us when we went to bed. Initially she would do her business in the corridor, but in about three or four days she was consistently relieving herself outside. We did nothing special other than praise her with treats when she went outside and clean her inside messes immediately after they happened with a mix of water and bleach. We never scolded her (maybe just a panicked "Nooo!" escaped us once or twice). Although our first idea was for her to sleep in the upsairs corridor, she slept with us (on the floor) on her first night and after a while we felt sorry to kick her out, so she has stayed.

True, they usually don't relieve themselves where they sleep. The few times Nix has had an accident, she's relieved herself in the downstairs corridor. Ironically, during the day she is usually there. In the summer, because it's cooler, and also because she waits for us (or my husband) when we're away.

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I am not sure with how she acts when we aren't around seeing as I have a family member at my house when me and my wife are working or away.
In a way this is good for her because she's not lonely, but I believe you should try to let her on her own for small periods of time at first. Try to walk and tire her out before you leave her alone, and you could also leave her with something to chew or a toy to keep her entertained. That's what we did with Nix. Even if you're careful, there is the risk that she'll destroy something while you're away, so keep your valuable things out of her reach. In our case, I consider that the losses have been minimal: a scratched wall and the lower part of the door frame is gone. A couple of times she also ripped papers apart. However, this usally happened when we were away for extended periods of time (from four to six hours). She now sometimes barks when we leave, but luckily it's not always and by the time we get back (sometimes we're away for just 20-30 minutes) she has stopped.

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When she is hungry she gets pretty destructive with things like her water and food bowl, but we do not feed her because we are trying to keep her schedule. We do however take her outside for some play time.
Mine also acts in weird way to catch our attention. As a puppy, I remember she sometimes would place her paw in the water bowl, scratch it and make a mess. What we normally did was to take away her water bowl for a while. At one point she stopped doing it. Similarly, she sometimes played or chewed her food bowl, but we'd also take it away. Fortunately, she no longer does any of this though.

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I did notice however when she is in her area she is either looking for us if we run in the house or laying down hiding in a sense waiting for us. For example if we put her down to use the restroom and go inside to get something or fix her food bowl by the time we come out she is hanging on the pet fence we use to block her area.
I think this is standard GSD behaviour. They are loyal dogs who want to be aware of everything that is going on around them. So they try to get as close to the action as possible and can get frustrated if they can't. But they also have to learn to be patient and wait.

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As well as if we are not watching her and she poos she will eat it if we are near her she will do her business and walk away
If I understood correctly, she eats her poo when you're not watching? I know some dogs do this, but sometimes it can be due to some kind of nutritional deficiency. Make sure you're giving her a balanced food.

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We want her to be a house dog so we eventually want to give her some freedom to walk around the house at a later age, we just would rather do it slowly like maybe instead of giving her the whole room buy a pen and make her use that for a while. If that also seems like a good plan. our goal is to get her used to the whole house in small doses instead of trying to let her out and walk around and stuff.
I think GSD are great house dogs who love to be around their owners. This will probably work, but as I explained above, I have no experience
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