Over dominating Nature of My 9 months old gsd - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #1 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-14-2016, 09:08 AM Thread Starter
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Over dominating Nature of My 9 months old gsd

Hello everyone.
i have a pure breed GSd who is 9 months old now.
He is naughty and mischievous as ****.he hardly bothers about the commands he is being taught. he will do all sorts of mis behaviour like. when i come back from work he would directly jump on me and will bite my ankle sometimes out of human nature i give him a slap but not too brutally.
he would pull the leash as much as he can and makes walking him a really difficult task.
and he would always stop at each and every plant or street light pole and would keep on sniffing it for minutes.
the most important problem is his behaviour and the way he walks.
i got a trainer for him and he asked me to first bring a choke chain and a very heavy leash for him.
i dont like choke chains so i asked him not to get trained from somebody and would train him myself.

please provide suggestions to me how to train him basic obidience and some manners.

also he hates his food a lot.
i give him royal canin german shepherd food.
he would act lazy seeing the food and would go away from the place where his food is kept. i even tried giving him boiled eggs with royal canin but he would only pick up the boiled eggs and would leave the food as it is.

my vet suggests that rc is a good brand i also asked one of my friends to give me a small quantity of farmina doggy food.

everyday he needs something different to eat.

please provide me with help.
as this food problem is a really problematic issue for me.

thanks in advance
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post #2 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-14-2016, 09:51 AM
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As far as food goes, I've never had a food fussy dog until I had German Shepherds. I use kibble moistened and adding a bit of canned food. Now and then I add other tid bits or broth. In their breakfast portion I add a boiled egg. I don't panic if they don't eat. I pick up the meal after 15 minutes and put it away until their next meal. If they don't eat it that meal,then I pick it up and throw it away and give them a fresh meal the next timr. I seldom have to throw the food away and neither of my dogs have starved yet. They are both slim and I'd like to see a pound or two more on them, but I don't worry about it or cater to them more than I already do.

For the trainer, I'd go with a prong collar over a choke collar. Your pup is at an age where he needs consequences for pig headed behavior. Treats and rewards are great for teaching a new behavior and promoting wanted behaviors but honestly, sometimes an entire roast beef won't be more interesting than the smell a gal in heat might have left on a light pole. That is where leash pressure is needed. For tugging you need to be more stubborn than the dog and use the consequence of no forward movement when he tugs. Wait for him to be calm before rewarding him with forward movement. It will be stop and go for a long time, be patient. if he lunges, a ding from the prong collar tells him that lunging is something that can be unpleasant. Don't feel bad about it. It could save his life.

for jumping on you, he is glad to see you. Ignore him as best you can until he calms down. We were able to teach my boy to come greet with a toy in his mouth. It helped the urge for him to grab us when we came in the door.

Finding a good trainer is invaluable. Not only can they see things you might miss, like poor timing on rewards or corrections but they can encourage you when it seems like you are not gaining any ground.
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Last edited by car2ner; 09-14-2016 at 09:55 AM.
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post #3 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-14-2016, 11:04 AM
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Hey Lakshay... where do you live? Do you have access to really good trainers.

Sounds like you have a confident, full of himself GSD which many people very strongly desire. While you are blaming him a lot for not being a poodle type (reread your post), it really is a matter of you, you increasing and developing your skills to work with what sounds like a great dog. But he is not a dog for a lazy handler. YOU need to increase investment in your skills.

I'm not trying to be mean. I was there once. But blaming the dog gets you nowhere... and actually will deteriorate the relationship with your dog. It will come down to investing in your skills and coming up into the world of handling this majestic breed.

With food, slowly cycle him to a new food that has a different protein/carbohydrate mix.

Best of luck... commit...invest....

Karin
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Rescue GSD - Freyja (Husband's Dog)
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post #4 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-14-2016, 11:23 AM
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I went through alot of different foods settled on origin but she still only eats when she feels like it. My dog used to walk the same way as yours used a prong collar 2 corrections no more pulling. I still use it but there are 2 different loops on this collar one basically dissables the pinch effect. Now I let her smell a bit and just a slite pressure on the collar gets her moving again.
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post #5 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-14-2016, 01:09 PM
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Show him who's boss and kick his a.. No I don't mean literally kick or beat your dog. I'd keep a pinch collar on him when he's out of his crate and attach a 9" grab line and correct him with a firm pop from the grab line. If he bites you, well you decide what to do. Same thing with walks. Use a pinch collar, pop it hard if he pulls against it hard. You may want to look at an e collar if the pinch doesn't work for you. Also, immediate 'time outs' for bad behavior. Works for kids, inmates and dogs.
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post #6 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-14-2016, 01:13 PM
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Sounds like a typical GSD to me. Mine was so well behaved as a pup then turned into a jerk for a good 2 years. All the gsd people I talked to told me he'd grow out of it as I grew into a proper handler. Sure enough, that's exactly what happened.

The dog is a teenager trying to find out how to get his way. You are the school teacher that teaches proper behavior. Once in a while the dog wears the dunce hat but lots of times the hat fits the teachers head much better
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post #7 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-14-2016, 02:44 PM Thread Starter
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@ travelers mom- thanks for the input.

But somehow you just illustrated the problem in a simple way.
That's what i am asking how to teach him took be patient and not bite me for each and every thing.
I seriously don't want these prong collars or choke chains. They look like torture equipments to me.
I want learning for him to be a fun activity and not a stressful activity.
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post #8 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-14-2016, 02:47 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by ausdland View Post
Show him who's boss and kick his a.. No I don't mean literally kick or beat your dog. I'd keep a pinch collar on him when he's out of his crate and attach a 9" grab line and correct him with a firm pop from the grab line. If he bites you, well you decide what to do. Same thing with walks. Use a pinch collar, pop it hard if he pulls against it hard. You may want to look at an e collar if the pinch doesn't work for you. Also, immediate 'time outs' for bad behavior. Works for kids, inmates and dogs.
Thanks for the input.
But i seriously don't like to torture him using pinch collars and other things.

I want him to have some fear in his mind and also not to misbehave at every step.
While walking he would jump on me bite my hands.
Would even bite my pockets thinking that there are biscuits in them
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post #9 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-14-2016, 02:48 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Traveler's Mom View Post
Sounds like a typical GSD to me. Mine was so well behaved as a pup then turned into a jerk for a good 2 years. All the gsd people I talked to told me he'd grow out of it as I grew into a proper handler. Sure enough, that's exactly what happened.

The dog is a teenager trying to find out how to get his way. You are the school teacher that teaches proper behavior. Once in a while the dog wears the dunce hat but lots of times the hat fits the teachers head much better

Thanks for the input . But somehow you just illustrated the problem in a simple way. That's what i am asking how to teach him took be patient and not bite me for each and every thing. I seriously don't want these prong collars or choke chains. They look like torture equipments to me. I want learning for him to be a fun activity and not a stressful activity.
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post #10 of 32 (permalink) Old 09-14-2016, 02:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Lakshay View Post
Hello everyone.

i got a trainer for him and he asked me to first bring a choke chain and a very heavy leash for him.
i dont like choke chains so i asked him not to get trained from somebody and would train him myself.

please provide suggestions to me how to train him basic obidience and some manners.

thanks in advance
Well you can start by apologizing to the trainer and give him a chance, it is not a good reason you provide for writing him off. A choke chain is a misunderstood tool that you NEED to learn how to use, or else you are going to end up with an unwalkable dog who will get in bad shape because you never took the time to train him properly. I find that the typical "if they pull, just stop" doesn't work with a strong-willed GSD who is enthusiastic and excitable. This is part of the breed's character, especially if your dog has working line blood like mine does. Prong collars are another good option... "Power steering" they call it. Like I've said before, they are not cruel, what is cruel is allowing a dog to develop out of control and later either not walk him or abandon him because of unmanageable behavior...
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