Not sure what to do... - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-01-2016, 07:10 PM Thread Starter
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Not sure what to do...

I've had my puppy chase for a little over 2 weeks now( he's 9 weeks old) . In this time I've had him I've trained him to sit, lay down, paw and of course potty training. He's so smart, I can hardly believe it.

Obviously while training I've been using treats and praise to let him know what a good boy he is, but I've ran into what I think is a problem (if it isn't please correct me) Chase likes to nip my hand for treats in the middle of the command or right after he's done it, he barely gives me anytime to even praise him and give him a treat. I don't want to tell him "no" and him think that the command he just did is a "no". I'm very unsure what to do, will he grow out of that?

I've signed him up for a 6 week obedience class that starts this week. I'm so excited!
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post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-01-2016, 07:32 PM
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Is the obedience class a one on one or a group class.
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post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-01-2016, 07:32 PM
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Look up puppy biting and landsharking in the puppy section on the forum.If it was me I wouldn't give a verbal command until the biting is under control later on.He'll follow your hand into position to get the treat or toy.You might be better off using a rope toy or something he can bite.Just to get used to positions.Sit,down,heel,around your legs in a circle.If he bites,a loud No! enough to startle him into stopping.Then Good Boy! And back to playing.If he gets too wound up and crazy it's time for a potty break and nap
Also careful about being around other dogs until his second round of shots.

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post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-01-2016, 07:52 PM Thread Starter
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Look up puppy biting and landsharking in the puppy section on the forum.If it was me I wouldn't give a verbal command until the biting is under control later on.He'll follow your hand into position to get the treat or toy.You might be better off using a rope toy or something he can bite.Just to get used to positions.Sit,down,heel,around your legs in a circle.If he bites,a loud No! enough to startle him into stopping.Then Good Boy! And back to playing.If he gets too wound up and crazy it's time for a potty break and nap
Also careful about being around other dogs until his second round of shots.

Thank you! I'll try the toy thing instead of treats, I'm hoping that will work! & He already has his second round of shots!
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post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-01-2016, 07:55 PM Thread Starter
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Is the obedience class a one on one or a group class.
It's at a local pet store, so I believe it's a group class, but I also believe we get split up around the store so it's more one on one.

There's a trainer out by where I live, "Don Morris" who trained GSDs for the military and actually trained the armed forces how to train their dogs, but I can't take him there until he's 15 weeks old so I figured this 6 week session won't hurt
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post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-01-2016, 08:21 PM
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The command I always teach seperately then incorporate when needed is "wait" and "take it". You put a treat in your hand and close your hand(fist) put your hand in front of pup and of course they are going to try to get that treat. You tell them wait, once they take their nose away you open your hand exposing the treat, if they try try to grab the treat close your hand, repeat this until they are no longer trying to get the treat and are looking at your open hand and treat, then tell them to take it and let them take it gently from your hand. Repeat multiple times a day until the pup gets it. Once the pup understands and he is trying to grab your hand a simple wait will let him know not to do that. Do not be surprised when you do this the first time that the pup will sit and stare at your hand waiting because you just might tell him to take it.

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post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-01-2016, 08:27 PM
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I would train the puppy to be gentle.

Train GENTLE with treats.

Start by saying GENTLE and then offering a treat with your open palm -- treat in the middle. The pup has to take it gently because they just don't take a wide open hand, they put their mouth on the treat and take it.

Say "Good Gentle." and repeat this, several times a day, for 4-7 days. Always use the word GENTLE before, and Good Gentle afterwards.

There is no hurry. You are teaching the pup to associate a word with an action of being careful. Take your time.

When he is good at this, make it a little harder. Put your thumb over the treat. Say GENTLE, and offer it with the thumb over it. If he bites your thumb, say, Eh, No! and then try again, GENTLE in a soft but firm tone. When he takes it Gently, Good Gentle.

Repeat, repeat, many times 4-7 days. No hurry.

When this is 100%, move on and close your fist. Say GENTLE and offer your closed fist. He is smart and has a good nose, he knows there is a treat there. If he bites your fist, "Eh, no!" and put it in your pocket. Try again in half an hour or so. If he licks your hand, open it and say, "Good Gentle."

Repeat, repeat, repeat until he is 100% and so that you have don this many times over 4-7 days. Continue to remind him, continue to say good gentle every single time.

Now, make it tougher, put it inbetween your thumb and fore finger. Tell him, GENTLE, and watch him delicately take it out of your fingers. Good Gentle. When he is perfect at this point, the command -- the word, should be associated to being careful with his teeth. Now, you can refer to other things with the Gentle command. Gentle with my fingers. Gentle with the baby.

And if he is pushy, remind him, GENTLE. If he continues to be pushy, do not give him a treat. In fact, training or no training do not treat the dog if he is being too pushy about getting it. You are rewarding his pushiness and creating a monster.

Teach him to always take treats gently. He'll get it. He's smart.

Also, you have a dog now that seems to be too treat motivated. I know he is a baby, and that shouldn't be a consideration at this stage. I agree with substituting for a toy, but do give treats to lure him into position for new tasks, and for doing something exceptionally well. It is called phasing treats out.

If you know what clicker training is, they communicate that the dog did the right thing by clicking with the clicker. Well, the dog wouldn't give a patootie about the clicker if they did not "load" the clicker. They do this by clicking and giving a treat. Well, I don't want to carry clickers around and have to have my hand on some gadget to communicate with my dog. In the early part of training, I use treats to load my praise. Works anyway with praise, treats or no, because you can make your voice happy. But treats are even more rewarding at some points. So when you treat your dog, you tell him Good boy, what a good dog you are, good Gentle, good boy. And this is all in the tones that that extraordinary instrument you were born with can make that lets the dog know he did a good thing.

So we load our voice, our praise with rewards. And then we start phasing out the treats. We start giving treats every time, and then we back down to every other time, or every third time. Or, if obedience is our thing, we start giving treats for the best sit, the straightest sit, the quickest down, the perfect come-front. Yours is a baby yet, so all of that will come in time.

But the baby is giving you an indication that treats might become a problem for him. So you stop giving them when he pushes. You say, "Eh! No!" You have to have your timing right. Say Good boy, immediately when he completes the task satisfactorily, and reach in your pocket, and say "Wait" get it out and say GENTLE, and offer it to the dog. He will learn that he cannot push you to get a treat.

Try not to let treats get to be a big deal. And use your voice to let him know the measure of his success. Praise can be a quick, good boy, or a total party, "Good boy, Fido! what a good boy you are! You are such a good boy. Let's do that again!" and everywhere in between. It can be a low toned, good boy to let him know he did the right thing, ordinary, what we expect. Or high pitched and excited to amp him up a bit or to let him know he did really good. Your voice is a powerful tool.

If you cannot speak, I am sorry. But you can get him excited teaching him totally in sign language as well, using pets, and signs to let him know he did good too. And Smiles -- they look at our face.

Another game with the treats to do, LOOK or WATCH Me. Put treats in both fists, and the pup will go for one or the other. when he looks at your face, offer him a treat and say, Good Look. What you are doing is teaching him to get his cues from your face. And to focus on you. Dogs know the difference between frowny faces, and Happy faces. They are quite intelligent.
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post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-01-2016, 08:49 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by selzer View Post
I would train the puppy to be gentle.

Train GENTLE with treats.

Start by saying GENTLE and then offering a treat with your open palm -- treat in the middle. The pup has to take it gently because they just don't take a wide open hand, they put their mouth on the treat and take it.

Say "Good Gentle." and repeat this, several times a day, for 4-7 days. Always use the word GENTLE before, and Good Gentle afterwards.

There is no hurry. You are teaching the pup to associate a word with an action of being careful. Take your time.

When he is good at this, make it a little harder. Put your thumb over the treat. Say GENTLE, and offer it with the thumb over it. If he bites your thumb, say, Eh, No! and then try again, GENTLE in a soft but firm tone. When he takes it Gently, Good Gentle.

Repeat, repeat, many times 4-7 days. No hurry.

When this is 100%, move on and close your fist. Say GENTLE and offer your closed fist. He is smart and has a good nose, he knows there is a treat there. If he bites your fist, "Eh, no!" and put it in your pocket. Try again in half an hour or so. If he licks your hand, open it and say, "Good Gentle."

Repeat, repeat, repeat until he is 100% and so that you have don this many times over 4-7 days. Continue to remind him, continue to say good gentle every single time.

Now, make it tougher, put it inbetween your thumb and fore finger. Tell him, GENTLE, and watch him delicately take it out of your fingers. Good Gentle. When he is perfect at this point, the command -- the word, should be associated to being careful with his teeth. Now, you can refer to other things with the Gentle command. Gentle with my fingers. Gentle with the baby.

And if he is pushy, remind him, GENTLE. If he continues to be pushy, do not give him a treat. In fact, training or no training do not treat the dog if he is being too pushy about getting it. You are rewarding his pushiness and creating a monster.

Teach him to always take treats gently. He'll get it. He's smart.

Also, you have a dog now that seems to be too treat motivated. I know he is a baby, and that shouldn't be a consideration at this stage. I agree with substituting for a toy, but do give treats to lure him into position for new tasks, and for doing something exceptionally well. It is called phasing treats out.

If you know what clicker training is, they communicate that the dog did the right thing by clicking with the clicker. Well, the dog wouldn't give a patootie about the clicker if they did not "load" the clicker. They do this by clicking and giving a treat. Well, I don't want to carry clickers around and have to have my hand on some gadget to communicate with my dog. In the early part of training, I use treats to load my praise. Works anyway with praise, treats or no, because you can make your voice happy. But treats are even more rewarding at some points. So when you treat your dog, you tell him Good boy, what a good dog you are, good Gentle, good boy. And this is all in the tones that that extraordinary instrument you were born with can make that lets the dog know he did a good thing.

So we load our voice, our praise with rewards. And then we start phasing out the treats. We start giving treats every time, and then we back down to every other time, or every third time. Or, if obedience is our thing, we start giving treats for the best sit, the straightest sit, the quickest down, the perfect come-front. Yours is a baby yet, so all of that will come in time.

But the baby is giving you an indication that treats might become a problem for him. So you stop giving them when he pushes. You say, "Eh! No!" You have to have your timing right. Say Good boy, immediately when he completes the task satisfactorily, and reach in your pocket, and say "Wait" get it out and say GENTLE, and offer it to the dog. He will learn that he cannot push you to get a treat.

Try not to let treats get to be a big deal. And use your voice to let him know the measure of his success. Praise can be a quick, good boy, or a total party, "Good boy, Fido! what a good boy you are! You are such a good boy. Let's do that again!" and everywhere in between. It can be a low toned, good boy to let him know he did the right thing, ordinary, what we expect. Or high pitched and excited to amp him up a bit or to let him know he did really good. Your voice is a powerful tool.

If you cannot speak, I am sorry. But you can get him excited teaching him totally in sign language as well, using pets, and signs to let him know he did good too. And Smiles -- they look at our face.

Another game with the treats to do, LOOK or WATCH Me. Put treats in both fists, and the pup will go for one or the other. when he looks at your face, offer him a treat and say, Good Look. What you are doing is teaching him to get his cues from your face. And to focus on you. Dogs know the difference between frowny faces, and Happy faces. They are quite intelligent.

Wow thank you so much, I'll definitely take your advice! I appreciate it!
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post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-01-2016, 08:49 PM
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We started with putting the treat in a closed fist and asking her to touch. She was permitted to nudge or lick, but not nip or chew. We marked with, "Yes!" and followed with, "Good touch!" and offered the treat. "Touch" is also still a fun game to play with her now and then. Think like giving five, up high, on the side, you can switch up where you ask the pup to stretch with its nose. (Note: This command is coming in really handy for tightening up heeling; my dog has a tendency to lag on off leash heeling, so I have her "touch" intermittently with my hand held so her head is at my left knee.)

My husband started teaching "gentle" awhile back. I kind of forget when. I just piggybacked on what he was doing, so I don't know how he started. But she will now reliably take a treat gently. If she's excited, she might need a verbal reminder, but she's gotten pretty good.
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post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-01-2016, 09:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Molly Kathleen Walsh View Post
I've had my puppy chase for a little over 2 weeks now( he's 9 weeks old) . In this time I've had him I've trained him to sit, lay down, paw and of course potty training. He's so smart, I can hardly believe it.

Obviously while training I've been using treats and praise to let him know what a good boy he is, but I've ran into what I think is a problem (if it isn't please correct me) Chase likes to nip my hand for treats in the middle of the command or right after he's done it, he barely gives me anytime to even praise him and give him a treat. I don't want to tell him "no" and him think that the command he just did is a "no". I'm very unsure what to do, will he grow out of that?

I've signed him up for a 6 week obedience class that starts this week. I'm so excited!
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