How do you become a "dominant" or "strong" handler? - German Shepherd Dog Forums
 56Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 55 (permalink) Old 06-05-2016, 11:54 PM Thread Starter
Banned
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 850
How do you become a "dominant" or "strong" handler?

Was researching working line dogs, some say they require a dominant or strong handler. What exactly do they mean by this? I've raised dogs in the past but I don't think I was a "dominant" handler. A little more specifics would be great from experienced handlers.
Julian G is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 55 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 12:50 AM
Crowned Member
 
Sabis mom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 4,928
I prefer the term confident. They are referring to a handler who is capable of leading the dog. One who doesn't waver or become indecisive, giving the dog cause to doubt you. It also refers to a handler who can remain clear, focused and calm which is ideally where you want your dog at as well. Some dogs will actively challenge a handler and the person holding the leash has to be confident and strong enough to deal with that, because if you let them win once you make things much harder for both of you.
onyx'girl, Jax08, car2ner and 3 others like this.
Sabis mom is online now  
post #3 of 55 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 01:07 AM
Elite Member
 
voodoolamb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: NC
Posts: 1,726
Eh. It's more important to be consistent and fair then dominant and strong with most dogs, even the working lines IMHO

Most pet owners I've met are very very inconsistent with their dogs. Forgetting to release after commands, not reinforcing ignored commands, constantly changing the rules.

My, albeit limited, experience with working dogs seems to be their are a plethora of personalities amongst them and to say all WL need a strong or dominant handler just doesn't fit. I've seen dogs that are so hard that practically need a 2x4 slammed over their head before they notice a correction. I've seen others that act like the world is ending if their person just gives a stern verbal. Some dogs shut down if given a correction too strong for it. Others will turn and lash out at their handlers for the unfair treatment. Most are somewhere in the middle.

If you are interested in a working line dog the most important thing is developing a good relationship with some breeders, owners, and trainers. There are going to be dogs out there to suit just about any handler's style, energy, experience level, and goals.

Getting to know people who work dogs regularly well help you find people producing dogs you will be best matched with.
ugavet2012 and Sabis mom like this.
voodoolamb is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 55 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 02:55 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Dayton NV
Posts: 7,657
This should give you a bit of insight:


I think Jeff explains it way better than I can.
Chip18 is offline  
post #5 of 55 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 03:07 AM
Crowned Member
 
MineAreWorkingline's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 5,401
How much are you getting paid for that?

With that said, I would hardly compare owning a working line German Shepherd to anything remotely similar to owning a Pit Bull. Many familiar with both breeds concur no two types of dogs are more diametrically opposed.
MineAreWorkingline is offline  
post #6 of 55 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 04:37 AM
Elite Member
 
voodoolamb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: NC
Posts: 1,726
Quote:
Originally Posted by MineAreWorkingline View Post
How much are you getting paid for that?

With that said, I would hardly compare owning a working line German Shepherd to anything remotely similar to owning a Pit Bull. Many familiar with both breeds concur no two types of dogs are more diametrically opposed.
Having actually owned both pits and gsds. I disagree with this statement.

Yes they are different breeds and have different drives and temperaments. My gsd is suspiscious of strangers. My pit was dog aggressive, etc. However the actual day to day life with them (re owning) has a lot more in common then say a GSD vs spaniel or a GSD vs Havanese or a GSD vs Newfoundland or GSD vs a Greyhound. (I say those as they are other breeds I have experience with)

I'm talking day to day as in dealing with prey drive, exercise needs, training needs, and their general management. Heck I have found that my pits and gsd even prefer the same type of games that my other breeds were meh about. Like tug and nosework.

Anywho.

Didn't watch chips video. Something about the dude annoys me. Can't put my finger on it. Hey may be the best trainer in the world, I wouldn't know (and don't take this post as me bashing his skills). Could be a great video with fantastic info - i just can't get through it lol
voodoolamb is offline  
post #7 of 55 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 05:08 AM
Crowned Member
 
MineAreWorkingline's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 5,401
Can't agree with that, handling a dog that is prone to HA is distinctly different than one prone to DA. I have been around too many of both. I really can't even see a comparison with the ease with which a person can take an HA dog out in public vs one that is DA, and I am not speaking fear aggression. I have owned HA dogs, the more HA the better for me, and I have owned DA dogs. Please, keep the DA dogs.

But seriously, never met a professional dog trainer, handler, breeder, etc., of HA aggressive breeds that did not consider DA a PITA, while appreciating HA and managing it with ease.

Not trying to start another Pit Bull thread, then again, I was not the one to bring up Pit Bulls, but there were two separate incidences in the past 24 hours where a man was killed by a friend's Pit Bull (which he knew) in CA and a 7 year old boy in Maine was killed by the family pet Pit mix. No, no way can anybody advise that the two breeds are similar, or share similar requirements.
MineAreWorkingline is offline  
post #8 of 55 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 06:26 AM
Elite Member
 
voodoolamb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: NC
Posts: 1,726
At the last IPO show I went to I saw a lot of shepherds and mals. A rottie. 2 dobies. 3 or 4 American bull dogs. 2 Pits. A ACD. A Dutchie. Oh and one very cool mutt.

Seems to me if they are competing in the same sport successfully there are similarities. At least more similarities between them and many other breeds.

Quote:
But seriously, never met a professional dog trainer, handler, breeder, etc., of HA aggressive breeds that did not consider DA a PITA, while appreciating HA and managing it with ease
I have. Plenty of them. American Bulldogs are pretty known for DA. Yet I'm pretty sure the director for the USCA southeast region has titled a half dozen of 'em.

But that aside pits really have nothing to do with this thread. I stomached some of that video an non of it was pit bull breed specific really.
Mudypoz likes this.
voodoolamb is offline  
post #9 of 55 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 08:08 AM
Knighted Member
 
newlie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 2,383
With my little experience, I also prefer words like confident and leader. Just to give a small example, I got my one and only GSD when he was roughly between 1-2 years old. He would have been considered an easy dog by most people on this forum, but he was a handful for me, just full of energy and hormones. He also acted like he had the choice of obeying me or not and much of that was my doing. I am a soft-spoken person and began to realize that it was the tone and projection of my voice and body language that gave him that idea. Once I realized that, I had to learn to give commands in a firm, no-nonsense manner and Newlie responded much better to that, it was like a light came on in his head "Oh yeah, THIS is what she wants me to do."
newlie is offline  
post #10 of 55 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 08:10 AM
Moderator
 
car2ner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Maryland
Posts: 4,415
stepping away from the breed discussion here is how I look at the Dominant / Strong handler. It means this dog will be testing you so you need to have clear limits in mind. And you have to be consistent in enforcing them. It means using positive training for teaching new skills but not being afraid to use some appropriate corrections once you know the dog understands what you want yet refuses. Corrections do not mean beating the dog, though. You have to keep up with this dog, know his body language well and his moods so you can adjust unacceptable behavior right from the start. It is much harder teaching proper behavior if you have to play catch-up.

It is not so much Pack Leader mentality but Benevolent Dictator. You wouldn't let a child run the house, don't let the dog run the house.

about.me/car2ner
Patton CGC BH
Chief fetch fanatic

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

car2ner is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome