8 Week old puppy. - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-19-2016, 09:53 PM Thread Starter
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Unhappy 8 Week old puppy.

Hi guys, I just got my first puppy, who is a German Shepherd, I believe this is the 5th day I've had him, and he's doing pretty good so far with the family.. But, I have a couple of questions.. When I first got him, the first day, he was very gentle, constantly licking, same with the second day, now lately he's been mouthing me pretty roughly, biting the couch.. And doing a lot more than just that (most likely teething, which is okay because he's just a baby)

I was wondering, since he's 8 weeks old, should I be teaching him bite inhibition? Or should I wait till he's slightly older before I teach him that? Because, I've been researching online and I've been seeing people say to play, and if he mouths / bites, and if it's hard, to say "Ow!" loudly, stop, and walk away. I've been doing this. But I'm not sure if it's working well. He does sort of stop, yesterday, when I would do this, he would stop, and while I walk away, run after me and give me some licks, and be gentle, but he's not really being soft with his mouth.

On my hand, even as an 8 week old pup, I was teaching him bite inhibition a bit ago, and now there's a mark slightly above my wrist, it look like my skin has risen up, like you know when you get a bug bite, or a mosquito bite, and it turns slightly a bit pink, and it "rises" up sort of like bubbly... That's what happened to my skin, but very long and slightly thin after him biting.

Also, he tends to roll on his back, and or, roll over during play, while mouthing, is this perfectly okay? Also, what should I be training him first, I know he's only a baby, but I mean, when should I start training him, when he turns 9 weeks or, slightly older? So far, I've been just been teaching him his name a little bit, and come, which has been going OK. He has a small attention span like every puppy, though, haha.

Also, is it bad that I got a German Shepherd as my first puppy? - I've always loved the breed...
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-19-2016, 10:57 PM
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First of all, its a great choice having a german shepherd. Though it takes a bit more effort to train the breed but if done in the proper manner the breed really pays off. He is the best ever friend you can have in your life.

Now lets get to the main issue. The biting inhibition should be done as early as possible. Because as the time passes by it will be hard and hard for you to teach him not to bite him as the biting habit matures with time.

As for the other training practices, like training your puppy to come or teaching him to sit can wait a few more weeks.

The bruise you mentioned sounds to be an allergic reaction. You can further consult a doctor for that.

Hope i answered all your questions.
Thank you.


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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-19-2016, 11:19 PM
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You need to keep 'bite' site clean. best with soap and water.

I have marks from most of my GSD pups. It's what they do since they don't have hands.

At such a young age, just redirect with toys or tugs.

They are puppies, they they are not trying to cause pain, just acting like they would with littermates.

But make sure that bite site stays clean!

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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-19-2016, 11:40 PM
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Get some cotton rope, soak it in water and freeze them. When your puppy gets particularly bitey, get one of those out of the freezer and let him work on it.

He is a puppy and he is going to want to bite and play. You do not need to teach bite inhibition. You only need to teach that if the puppy was pulled away from the litter too early. It doesn't sound like that is the case.

Ok, maybe we have a terminology issue. Puppies learn from their litters bite inhibition. They run around and play with each other, but when a puppy bites too hard, the other puppies will yipe, and if that doesn't stop him, they will not play with the bully. That is how they teach him he is being too rough. It does not teach him not to bite at all. We have to do that. And redirecting and providing outlets for his teeth is generally a good way to do that. Standing up, telling the puppy, "Eh! don't hurt the Susie!" or "Eh! No bites!" and not offering fingers (highly bitable parts) works too. But remember that he is going to need to use those teeth, and we have to give him appropriate things to bite on. If he is biting on the couch, Eh! Mine, then hand him his rope or bone and say, "Yours."

First time owners can be helped a whole lot by puppy classes. Usually after the second set of shots, sign him up for puppy classes and take him every week. Usually 6-8 weeks. Don't worry about perfect heeling, sitting, staying, you are there for the experience with the dog. After the puppy class, sign up for more classes. And more. Training will help you bond with your dog, through consistency and clear communication, praise, boundaries, etc.

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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-20-2016, 01:26 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by selzer View Post
Get some cotton rope, soak it in water and freeze them. When your puppy gets particularly bitey, get one of those out of the freezer and let him work on it.

He is a puppy and he is going to want to bite and play. You do not need to teach bite inhibition. You only need to teach that if the puppy was pulled away from the litter too early. It doesn't sound like that is the case.

Ok, maybe we have a terminology issue. Puppies learn from their litters bite inhibition. They run around and play with each other, but when a puppy bites too hard, the other puppies will yipe, and if that doesn't stop him, they will not play with the bully. That is how they teach him he is being too rough. It does not teach him not to bite at all. We have to do that. And redirecting and providing outlets for his teeth is generally a good way to do that. Standing up, telling the puppy, "Eh! don't hurt the Susie!" or "Eh! No bites!" and not offering fingers (highly bitable parts) works too. But remember that he is going to need to use those teeth, and we have to give him appropriate things to bite on. If he is biting on the couch, Eh! Mine, then hand him his rope or bone and say, "Yours."

First time owners can be helped a whole lot by puppy classes. Usually after the second set of shots, sign him up for puppy classes and take him every week. Usually 6-8 weeks. Don't worry about perfect heeling, sitting, staying, you are there for the experience with the dog. After the puppy class, sign up for more classes. And more. Training will help you bond with your dog, through consistency and clear communication, praise, boundaries, etc.
I have a toy for him, and I've been redirecting when he bites on his toys to chew up, because I understand he's teething, poor baby <3. I was told by everyone though to allow him to like, bite my hand, since he's a baby and his teeth are very small so it doesn't hurt, even when he's being rough, or, even medium bites, I still say "ow!" really loudly, and pretend to be hurt and I walk away and ignore him... I've been getting everyone in the household to do this. And then after I come back, I redirect him on a toy, or if I want to play with him I will be redirecting him on a toy, I keep his toys close to me.

I'm planning on taking him to puppy classes, I think I need all the shots for him here, before I'm allowed to take him.

So far, only having him for 4-5 days, I try to play with him as much as possible, there's 10 people who live in this household, so we give him loads of attention. The kids, 12 & 14, tend to lay on the carpet with him as well.

He's also been doing well, we tell him to come, and he comes (when his attention is on us, of course!) - And accepts his treat, we've been teaching him sit, and he's getting use to his name.

So I think I'm doing good so far.
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-20-2016, 01:27 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by selzer View Post
Get some cotton rope, soak it in water and freeze them. When your puppy gets particularly bitey, get one of those out of the freezer and let him work on it.

He is a puppy and he is going to want to bite and play. You do not need to teach bite inhibition. You only need to teach that if the puppy was pulled away from the litter too early. It doesn't sound like that is the case.

Ok, maybe we have a terminology issue. Puppies learn from their litters bite inhibition. They run around and play with each other, but when a puppy bites too hard, the other puppies will yipe, and if that doesn't stop him, they will not play with the bully. That is how they teach him he is being too rough. It does not teach him not to bite at all. We have to do that. And redirecting and providing outlets for his teeth is generally a good way to do that. Standing up, telling the puppy, "Eh! don't hurt the Susie!" or "Eh! No bites!" and not offering fingers (highly bitable parts) works too. But remember that he is going to need to use those teeth, and we have to give him appropriate things to bite on. If he is biting on the couch, Eh! Mine, then hand him his rope or bone and say, "Yours."

First time owners can be helped a whole lot by puppy classes. Usually after the second set of shots, sign him up for puppy classes and take him every week. Usually 6-8 weeks. Don't worry about perfect heeling, sitting, staying, you are there for the experience with the dog. After the puppy class, sign up for more classes. And more. Training will help you bond with your dog, through consistency and clear communication, praise, boundaries, etc.
Been washing my hands a couple times today, it's no longer sticking out my skin now, and now just looks like a regular scratch on my hand... Wonder why that happened.
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-20-2016, 03:47 AM
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Have you ever heard the term "Land Shark" for German Shepherd Puppies?

Don't be surprised if it gets worse before it gets better and lasts for quite a while!

All 4 of our GSD's went through this stage and MANY times they made us bleed and ripped our pants biting at our moving feet, so don't get discouraged. Takes time and training and ALL 10 people in your household need to be consistent with the SAME type of training and re-directing.

If you type "Land Shark" into the "SEARCH" box above, you can read of others who have had the same problems.

Here is a post that can help: https://www.germanshepherds.com/forum...tips-help.html

Good luck, take lots of pictures, and have fun with your new pup!
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-21-2016, 08:20 PM Thread Starter
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We've been bonding with him, we play with him non-stop till he's tired out, he's about 9 weeks now, or at least Sunday is when he's officially 9 weeks. I try to do 2 minute training sessions here and there, for this whole week of him being with me, he doesn't respond to his name, which is silly because we'd be having training sessions with him, and, he'll make eye-contact, when I say his name, and I treat him, a very small piece, but, when it comes to being in the yard, or anywhere in the house, if I say his name; "Shiloh" - he doesn't make eye-contact.

It's also silly too because, I've been trying to teach him come as well, I say come, and, if I get on my knees, he'll come, and make eye contact, then I tell him to sit, and he does, and then I treat him. When I tell him to come in the house, or anywhere else, yard included. He will not come.

Will he grow out of this behavior guys? He's a baby, so it's completely understandable, I've been watching Zak George's videos, and doing everything exactly, and listening to his tips and advice, I don't have a clicker though, but none of it seems to work.

Also, I live right next to a kid's school, so all I have to do is just cross the street and can take him, I've gotten him slightly use to his leash, like he'll come, but there'll be times where he stops and tries to pull back, it seemed to decrease slightly. I know I shouldn't be taking him for walks at this age, since he's only 9 weeks and just a baby, but I do it for exercise, and I play with him. He tends to try to eat literally every part of the grass and plant he sees, I have a long lead and try to let him explore, I allowed him to explore our whole yard as well.

Couple more things guys .. I've been doing the "Ow!" then instantly getting up and ignoring him, but that doesn't seem to work anymore because he doesn't care, I have bite marks all over my hands from his small teeth, because I've been trying to teach him bite inhibition, he doesn't seem to get softer with his mouth, really.

All of this is giving me a headache, haha. I've been trying to teach him potty training, but oddly, when he's on the leash he doesn't wanna go potty. He also doesn't wanna go potty on the grass, even if I were to have him out exploring on the grass for more than an hour, when beforehand he had eaten, he still won't potty. But... When we come home, he'll go straight for our deck and potty on our deck, so then I'm stuck cleaning the mess - any of you guys have advice for that?

I'm really upset with the breeder as well. His litter had yarn collars on their necks (different colours), when we picked him up the breeder mentioned him "taking off his collar himself" - when he went to poop today, a bit ago, it seems like some of that yarn collar came out in his poop.. I'm really upset as to why she didn't supervised him and had put on yarn collars in the first place, I don't know if it's all of it's out, but yesterday he was having major troubling popping, so I'm wondering if that's the reason why, we picked him up from the breeder, on Monday, it's now Saturday, it took that long for some of the yarn to come out.. Sigh..
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-21-2016, 11:35 PM
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I recommend watching these two videos: They are two of my favorite youtube trainers.



If you haven't, look into clicker training. It helps speed the training process up so much. It helps the puppy to understand what you want.

Last edited by Besketball; 05-21-2016 at 11:41 PM.
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-21-2016, 11:42 PM Thread Starter
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He just bit me just now, and drew blood, I'll watch these, thanks.
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