Interesting article - environmental factors for hip dysplasia - - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #1 of 32 (permalink) Old 12-12-2015, 06:30 AM Thread Starter
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Interesting article - environmental factors for hip dysplasia -

Saw this on facebook. Thought it might make a good discussion topic - struggled with where to put it

The 10 most important things to know about canine hip dysplasia - The Institute of Canine Biology

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post #2 of 32 (permalink) Old 12-12-2015, 06:42 AM
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Interesting article. I've thought for a long time it isn't genetic. Both of my dogs that have it are not over-weight(Robyn is slim and slender and Brennan is average now(but he just filled out). I got both dogs when they were about 12 weeks so I don't know what happened between birth until I got them.

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post #3 of 32 (permalink) Old 12-12-2015, 07:19 AM Thread Starter
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I am not sure ... Beau is OFA good and I ran him hard (on dirt playing fetch) between the ages of 12 and 24 months... I am going to be announcing about Tilly after the weekend and her Pennhip puts her in the 90% range (very tight hips) and her former handlers played frisbee with her. Both dogs are lean though. I still think genetics plays a role. But interesting factors.

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post #4 of 32 (permalink) Old 12-12-2015, 08:20 AM
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I have looked at too many x-rays of related dogs - as well as unrelated - to believe it is not genetic.

I think that this research has merit for sure - exercise and environments definitely have an adverse effect on forming bones. Look at horses - young racehorses break down like crazy - and saddle horses who are not pushed from 16-18 months onwards do not suffer the same types of injuries....osselets, shin splints - not just catastrophic breakdowns....

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post #5 of 32 (permalink) Old 12-12-2015, 08:49 AM
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The article did not say it was not genetic. I forget, something like 15-40% is genetic, it says, but the larger percentage, they then say, "more important", which sounds subjective to me, is the environment.

Interesting article. While I don't know the science, it does make me think of all the posts here that worry about their puppies being too thin and asking how to fatten them up. That desire for the big boned and big muscled shepherd and the misguided belief that they just need more food to get there.

The other thing about some of the posts here at the forum is the recommendation for supplementing puppies with all kinds of things. Just interesting. We certainly are more food obsessed than we used to be.

Years ago I had a lab mix that I'm sure I was the cause of his elbow dysplasia. I was young and stupid and never heard of growth plates and such. I used to mountain bike with my dogs and thought it was cool they could keep up with me on the down hills. He was much to young for that. I cringe that I did that knowing what I know now.

Anyhow, just early morning thoughts.

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post #6 of 32 (permalink) Old 12-12-2015, 09:10 AM
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As a Senior Vice President of a medical device company, my professional opinion is that, this article can be safely disregarded.

It has too much inarticulate and speculative information.

And any one who says "Genes causing so-and-so have not been found" - (sic) ergo it is not genetics based, is an idiot.
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post #7 of 32 (permalink) Old 12-12-2015, 09:32 AM Thread Starter
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Being a Senior VP of a medical device company may or may not mean your professional opinion is based on sound and current technical background. This is from the perspective of being a techno-geek in the biologics industry and dealing with senior management who often tend to be from more of an MBA etc backgound than a scientific one. The author has a PhD in Physiology from Cornell (I checked and they do have a program in this) so I would consider that to be reasonable credentials.

This piece links many journal articles and think it adds interesting discussion points. This was the quote which you disparaged as well as the detail.


2) The genes that cause hip dysplasia have not been found

Hip dysplasia tends to be more common in some breeds than others and in some lines than others, which suggests that there is a genetic component to the disorder. However, scientists have been looking for genes that are responsible for the development of hip dysplasia in dogs for decades without success

​Genes that are associated with hip dysplasia have been identified in some breeds, but they are breed-specific; that is, the assortment of genes is different in every breed. (For example, see studies on the German Shepherd dog (Marschall & Distl 2007, Fells & Distl 2014, and Fels et al 2014), Bernese Mountain Dog (Pfahler & Distl 2012), and Labrador Retriever (Phavaphutanon et al 2008.) Genes that could cause hip dysplasia have not been found in any breed.

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post #8 of 32 (permalink) Old 12-12-2015, 10:03 AM
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Interesting timeline on this... way before most of us even get a puppy!

Quote:
7) Exercise is good and bad
Exercise strengthens the muscles of the legs and pelvis that will increase the stability of the hip joint. But all exercise is not created equal.

Puppies raised on slippery surfaces or with access to stairs when they are less than 3 months old have a higher risk of hip dysplasia,while those who are allowed off-lead exercise on soft, uneven ground (such as in a park) have a lower risk (Krontveit et al 2012). Dogs born in summer have a lower risk of hip dysplasia, presumably because they have more opportunity for exercise outdoors (Ktontveit et al 2012). On the other hand, dogs from 12-24 months old that regularly chase a ball or stick thrown by the owner have an higher risk of developing dysplastic hips (Sallander et al 2006).

The most critical period for proper growth and development of the hip in dogs is from birth to 8 weeks old, so the type of exercise the puppies are exposed to is most important during this time.



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post #9 of 32 (permalink) Old 12-12-2015, 10:32 AM
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Playing ball between 12-24 mo?! Oh, wow. Talk about taking the joy out of life for some dogs, if that's true. I forwarded it to a vet I trust, to see what she thinks.

I really worry that the "it's all environmental" chorus seems like a way for sketchy breeders who make risky choices (not doing OFA certs etc) to deflect blame on the owners and absolve themselves of the need to be careful and thoughtful in order to create sound structure. Maybe the birth-to-8-weeks component puts even more pressure on them. I don't know.
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post #10 of 32 (permalink) Old 12-12-2015, 10:58 AM
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Good article. Joint laxity but this has been known? Would think genetic still plays a role along along with exercise, diet and trauma, learning about exercise and diet from this forum. I remember when max slipped and fell hard on his side and worrying about his hips. I'm making sure he has good food didn't grow to fast by over feeding and watching calcium/protein/phosphorous and when he runs it is not hard cement. I did my part but still think genetics will play there part as well. My grandfather was 93 and someone ran a red light and smashed right into his car he died. He drank lots of beer, smoked and had lungs pinker then mine and I don't smoke- genetics. Many many years ago so many German shepherds had bad hips(loose hips) seemed common. I do not see that so much today and would think careful breeding has a part in that.
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