Pup ate his own poo - Page 2 - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #11 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-13-2018, 10:34 AM
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You'll know if he goes in the crate, they don't mop up the schmutz, there will be residue. If you have the pup on a feeding schedule, his bowels movements will be consistently timed, get him outside and you won't have to worry about him eating it. I taught leave it and was actually successful with my newly adopted 1 year old. He completley lost interest after a couple of months until a course of antibiotics made it interesting again. It is certainly a gag worthy action, but nothing to freak out about.

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post #12 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-13-2018, 10:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Pawsed View Post
Our older dog has done this his entire life. I think he's nearing 9 now. The only way to control it was to pick it up as soon as possible. He also knows the "leave it" command and would do so while you were watching him. But he's sneaky and would soon find a way to get back to what he wanted and eat it.

We have been feeding raw, prey diet, for several months now and this behavior seems to have stopped completely. Coincidence? I have no idea, but we are sticking with raw, and for more than just this reason. Anyone else have this experience?
Yup. Mine was an indiscriminate reprocessed snacker from the get go. "Leave it" was taught early. When I switched to raw, it curtailed it a lot like 90%. He will still sneak a snack every once in a great while on his own reprocessed but not on others.

Op, nothing to freak out about just clean it up as quick as possible. If you catch your pup in the act, just be calm and matter of fact when you move him away to clean it up. Teach "leave it" with other things first then when he clearly understands the command use it for this purpose.
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post #13 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-13-2018, 11:32 AM
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Maybe it helps to know that eating his own won't make him sick, and it's incredibly common dog behavior? (FYI, he might try to eat his own vomit if he ever does that too.)



In addition to cleaning up fast at home, try to keep him from eating other dogs' poop when you are on walks -- that could make him sick if the other dog has intestinal parasites or other problems.
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post #14 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-13-2018, 11:47 AM
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What are you feeding?


Some diets I think come out, exactly as they go in. It becomes appealing again to the dog. This is gross - but the poop smells like the food (specifically canned foods).
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post #15 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-13-2018, 12:48 PM
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It wasn’t right away. It was sitting in the livingroom and as my gf went to get paper towels to clean.. that’s when it happened. Within a few min
She should have picked up the pup right away before getting the paper towels. I don't let pups see what I clean up to prevent too much focus. They are drawn to what you do.
Dogs are animals and live by their own standards of what is dirty or not. Be prepared that she may roll in a decomposed squirrel, eat human poop on trails (watch for toilet paper in the wild!), eat their own or another dog's vomit, clean their own butt etc. Afterwards they lick you if you let them
By the way, never punish a pup for an "accident". It is totally on us.

Last edited by wolfy dog; 07-13-2018 at 12:52 PM.
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post #16 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-13-2018, 12:56 PM
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Thanks Heartandsoul for your response. I'm glad to know that it really might be the raw food that is changing this behavior. Another good reason to feed this way!
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post #17 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-13-2018, 02:00 PM
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I feed raw, and Beau will eat poop if I don’t give him enough organ meat daily. If he gets the right amount of organs (for him), he leaves the poop where it falls.
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post #18 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-13-2018, 03:04 PM Thread Starter
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I feed him Kirkland puppy kibble- grain free
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post #19 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-13-2018, 03:32 PM
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Mine ate poop until she was 6-7 months old, I even pulled poop out of her mouth. Try not to freak out. Pick it up right away. Keep the puppy on leash outside so it doesn't eat poop especially other dogs. Teach it patiently no.
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post #20 of 25 (permalink) Old 07-13-2018, 03:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pawsed View Post
Our older dog has done this his entire life. I think he's nearing 9 now. The only way to control it was to pick it up as soon as possible. He also knows the "leave it" command and would do so while you were watching him. But he's sneaky and would soon find a way to get back to what he wanted and eat it.

We have been feeding raw, prey diet, for several months now and this behavior seems to have stopped completely. Coincidence? I have no idea, but we are sticking with raw, and for more than just this reason. Anyone else have this experience?
There's way more undigested 'food' pooped out with kibble. It's not a coincidence.
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