Puppy attitude problem - German Shepherd Dog Forums
 11Likes
  • 2 Post By tim_s_adams
  • 1 Post By MineAreWorkingline
  • 2 Post By cloudpump
  • 4 Post By Steve Strom
  • 2 Post By LuvShepherds
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 06-13-2018, 05:28 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 54
Puppy attitude problem

So things are going really well with our newest family member. He follows house rules, settles down, is responsive during training, mostly walks on a loose heel and is wonderful with our 1 year old daughter. But during the last 2 months or so he keeps having little biting fits that I'm starting to worry he will never grow out of. Basically if I stop him from doing something he wanted to do, he will just start nailing me with quite hard bites. Normally the situations arise when we go for a walk. For example he will try to pick up a stick, but I will keep walking and he will get in a mood about not being able to get it. Or I will let him greet someone on the street for a few moments and then call him back to me, reward him and then prevent him from returning to the other person. When he jumps to bite me i stay calm, tell him no and try to give him a correction and prevent him from actually getting me. Its a tricky move and he often manages to bite me a couple of times which I worry is reinforcing. He wears a normal flat collar but I leave it high and tight during walks to help make corrections effective. Sometimes he will only stop if I snap his collar so hard he gags or something comes along to distract him from attacking me. Normally I am able to re-engage with him and he returns to being absolutely lovely, but I'm. Sick of being bitten! Is this normal teenager behaviour? Advice on corrections or how to handle the fits? Thank you!
marwin is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 06-13-2018, 05:35 PM
Crowned Member
 
wolfy dog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 9,700
Get a trainer and a prong collar. You are hurting him to the point that he can get injured with a flat collar. Besides, corrections with a flat collar are ineffective. Gagging is the result of an abusive correction as you are physically hurting him.
wolfy dog is offline  
post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 06-13-2018, 05:41 PM
Master Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 561
How old is the pup?
Apex1 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 06-13-2018, 06:17 PM
Crowned Member
 
tim_s_adams's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Colorado
Posts: 3,565
From previous posts I see that your pup should be about 8 months old now. Not to be harsh, but if your 8 month old puppy is biting you for any reason you have a problem! Reading your current post, it sounds like he's biting out of frustration. Dogs don't see things from our perspective. If, when you're out on a walk and he tries to grab a stick, you just keep walking and drag him with you, then yes I can see why he's trying to tell you that isn't fair! Likewise, if you let him greet people then call him back, and then physically restrain him from going back for more petting, you're expecting him to think like a human...which he doesn't and never will! Teach your dog a "leave it" command, when he grabs for a stick tell him leave it, then let's go (or whatever command you use for let's keep moving). This way you're giving him something he knows to do, instead of just correcting him for doing something you don't want. With people, I'd recommend not letting him greet them at all if you're actively training. If not, what's wrong with letting him go back for more pets? Life with your dog requires a consistent dialog, if he's sometimes allowed to do something, and then from his perspective, arbitrarily restrained from doing that thing he's going to get confused and frustrated. And as a teenager, if he's biting or nipping you now out of frustration, as an adult he'll be much more forceful in his disagreement, so definitely make some changes now. Just a few sessions with a good trainer can help immensely!
dogma13 and Nurse Bishop like this.

It's not the size of the dog in the fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog. Mark Twain

Tim
tim_s_adams is online now  
post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 06-13-2018, 06:28 PM
Crowned Member
 
MineAreWorkingline's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 5,399
I agree to get a good trainer onboard that is familiar with this breed. This dog is already biting you, a prong just might ramp him up and make a bad situation worse. I would not do it unless under the supervision of a trainer.
LuvShepherds likes this.

If you need equipment to maintain control of your dog, understand youíre hanging on to your dogís body because youíve lost his mind!

Suzanne Clothier
MineAreWorkingline is offline  
post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 06-13-2018, 07:00 PM
Crowned Member
 
Sabis mom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 4,925
Quote:
Originally Posted by marwin View Post
So things are going really well with our newest family member. He follows house rules, settles down, is responsive during training, mostly walks on a loose heel and is wonderful with our 1 year old daughter. But during the last 2 months or so he keeps having little biting fits that I'm starting to worry he will never grow out of. Basically if I stop him from doing something he wanted to do, he will just start nailing me with quite hard bites. Normally the situations arise when we go for a walk. For example he will try to pick up a stick, but I will keep walking and he will get in a mood about not being able to get it. Or I will let him greet someone on the street for a few moments and then call him back to me, reward him and then prevent him from returning to the other person. When he jumps to bite me i stay calm, tell him no and try to give him a correction and prevent him from actually getting me. Its a tricky move and he often manages to bite me a couple of times which I worry is reinforcing. He wears a normal flat collar but I leave it high and tight during walks to help make corrections effective. Sometimes he will only stop if I snap his collar so hard he gags or something comes along to distract him from attacking me. Normally I am able to re-engage with him and he returns to being absolutely lovely, but I'm. Sick of being bitten! Is this normal teenager behaviour? Advice on corrections or how to handle the fits? Thank you!
He sounds fun! I like dogs with attitude for the very simple reason that you can train it down, but you can't train it up.
At this point you need a trainer. It sounds like the you have a combination of issues happening but without seeing it who knows. Why can he not pick up a stick though? Walks are supposed to be for him, not you. I would solve that by bringing along a tug or a toy that he can carry. I would work on a leave it command, I use it for people as well, though I get frowns when they realize I just called them an it! Lol.
Sabis mom is online now  
post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 06-13-2018, 07:01 PM
Elite Member
 
cloudpump's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Lyons NY
Posts: 1,902
Exercise, training, crate, and limited access to small children. Your puppy is too young to completely control himself. Both of my dogs were kept separate for a while as puppies from my daughter.
I say no prong unless you know how to use it for corrections.

Snitches get stitches.
cloudpump is offline  
post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 06-13-2018, 07:06 PM
Crowned Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 4,418
No, its not normal behavior Marwin. I'd say right now you're at a point where your fighting with him for some different reasons and where you're going to need the help is with keeping things clear and consistent with him. That doesn't always match what we think. There's a place for corrections, but its not as simple as just ramping those up.

Doc

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Steve Strom is offline  
post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 06-13-2018, 09:08 PM
Crowned Member
 
LuvShepherds's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 4,743
I wasnít going to post because you need a good trainer and youíve already been told that. But I read your post several times and itís very upsetting. First, things are not going well when an older pet puppy gets his way by biting his owner and handler. Itís never acceptable. Somehow you have allowed it. You may not know why but you can learn a lot from this if you can realistically look back at how he got the idea using teeth on you is alright. When did it first happen and why didn't you stop it then? Did it not bother you or did you not realize by allowing him to bite, you were also reinforcing it? Has he had any training? What type?
LuvShepherds is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome