Puppy obsessed with biting feet - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #1 of 23 (permalink) Old 02-27-2018, 05:19 PM Thread Starter
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Puppy obsessed with biting feet

Hi all, this is my first post!

I am a first time puppy owner but I've had an adult GSD before. Our 17 week old pup Amber is doing really well with training, walking on the lead, crate training, a bit of a handful at times but generally on her way to being a brilliant dog.

However, one habit is really bothering me. She's obsessed with chewing my feet! I've read that this is normal GSD herding behaviour but it's ALL THE TIME. If I am not playing with her, she is chewing my feet. I try redirecting with a toy (which I play with her, I don't just drop it in front of her and expect her to find more interesting than my feet) but that doesn't always work and it's not always practical. It'll be when I'm going to the bin to get her dry food, putting on a coat to take her for a walk, getting a glass of water to fill her water bowl, or something like that, so I can't just stop to play with her or I'd get nothing done.

I wear some old leather pumps round the house and wellies when we go for walks so it doesn't really hurt unless she accidentally gets my ankle (which isn't too often especially if I stand still). It's just obstructive.

I have tried putting things on my shoes like Tiger Balm and vinegar but it only puts her off temporarily. She seems to decide it's worth the nasty taste. She doesn't seem to do it anywhere near as much with my husband.

Is this something she'll grow out of? Or is this something I need to put a stop to? If so, how?

Just some background - we got Amber when she was 8 weeks old, and we leave her crated during the day for around 5 hours, with a neighbour coming halfway through that to let her out for a wee and a run round the garden (which is quite large). Sometimes I am the one who leaves her, and sometimes it's my husband. Sometimes I'm the one who comes home to her first, and sometimes it's him. She's going to training classes and when she knows a training is happening she is very obedient. She gets two walks a day plus games in the garden, training sessions, mental games like "find the treat!" in the house, and plenty of different things to chew. What we seem to find hard is getting her to stop doing things she sets her mind to. She has playdates with other family dogs once or twice a week. We did take her to puppy socialisation sessions at our local dog rescue but she is getting a bit big for that. She plays like a typical GSD!

So if she'd stop chewing my feet she'd be an angel. I would love to hear that she will grow out of it and I just need to make sure I wear hardy shoes in the meantime!
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post #2 of 23 (permalink) Old 02-27-2018, 09:26 PM
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Kaiser used to do that too... he is 15 months now and kinda grown out of it... there are still occassions where he bites feet..

1. If I've got fuzzy slippers on he can't resist
2. If I'm taking too long to put my shoes on to take him for a walk
3. I'm sitting on the couch and not paying attention to him

I don't think I did anything in particular to stop him just said no and would stand still for a little bit, it was the movement that would make him excited.
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post #3 of 23 (permalink) Old 02-27-2018, 09:50 PM
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Wear shoes. Mine lick bare feet and legs if I let them. I don’t let them, not that I mind but guests will.
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post #4 of 23 (permalink) Old 02-27-2018, 10:24 PM
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These little pups can be persistent can't they? When redirection didn't work I would crate for a nap or rest. My pup was so active, plus our home is busy he would get ornery he would never voluntarily rest. He loves to be in the middle of everything. So like a toddler in a way I would have to make sure he got his rest lol. So make sure your pup gets adequate rest. The inability to redirect was a sure sign for us that it was nap time.
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post #5 of 23 (permalink) Old 02-27-2018, 10:34 PM
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I missed that she chews your shoes. Maybe they smell like a toy. Do youngive her rawhides? If so, stop and give her something else. Don’t move your feet because that makes the game more fun. They outgrow all that puppy chewing and biting.
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post #6 of 23 (permalink) Old 02-27-2018, 11:50 PM
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Why not just make them stop? I'm not trying to be facetious, but if your cute little puppy was knocking over the trash or chasing the cat, or biting your child, you'd have no problem correcting them for that. Why would you not do that with biting your feet?

It's not the size of the dog in the fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog. Mark Twain

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post #7 of 23 (permalink) Old 02-28-2018, 12:06 AM
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Easier said then done speaking for myself.
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post #8 of 23 (permalink) Old 02-28-2018, 12:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Apex1 View Post
Easier said then done speaking for myself.
It's only hard if you aren't sure. For me, when a puppy or dog does something I don't like, I let them know that. It makes for a much more pleasant coexistence!

I think where people often get confused about this is (a) they read too much about it and over think it, or (b) they do the "I need to show them I'm alpha" thing, and get too rough with the puppy or dog, thinking I really need to show them who's boss. Neither is correct IMHO!

What you really need is to have a good relationship and an avenue of communication, with your dog. WHENEVER my puppy, or dog, does anything I don't like I let them know that. Not later, not after trying everything else, immediately. Bear in mind this does not mean I am harsh about it...it's communication, nothing else. But it's immediate and consistent and clear.

Try it...

It's not the size of the dog in the fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog. Mark Twain

Tim
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post #9 of 23 (permalink) Old 02-28-2018, 12:42 AM
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How do you make them stop ? From your experience...redirecting? Verbal command ?
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post #10 of 23 (permalink) Old 02-28-2018, 12:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tim_s_adams View Post
Why not just make them stop? I'm not trying to be facetious, but if your cute little puppy was knocking over the trash or chasing the cat, or biting your child, you'd have no problem correcting them for that. Why would you not do that with biting your feet?
But isn't this why the OP is here... they are asking how to stop it?
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