Oxytocin after Whelping - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-15-2018, 07:02 PM Thread Starter
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Oxytocin after Whelping

Is oxytocin safe to give the mother dog after whelping? I've read that the shot can be very dangerous, but is that only when a puppy is still inside? Is it safe to give when all the puppies are out (to clean out any placentas left inside)?

"The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together; and a little child shall lead them." Isaiah 11:6
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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-16-2018, 02:25 AM
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It's tough drug. Does it go into the milk and get into the puppies? I dunno. It makes the uteris contract and dispel what is in there, which could include a puppy whether you x-rayed for count or not. If a pup is across the birth canal or stuck, then it can rupture her uterine horn and kill her.

Mostly folks give oxytocin so the bitch won't be bleeding for days or even weeks. Convenience, and hard on the bitch in my opinion.

What you got to remember is that a dog is an animal. Animals survived for centuries without the help of humans. Which means canines are put together in such a way, that whelping and the removal of material in the uterine horns, is NATURALLY managed without any interference from us (for most breeds). A retained placenta could become toxic. Chances are greater for it to just pass naturally. Like it would in the wild. And, how do you know there IS a retained placenta. My bitches are licking and cleaning at the puppies before they come out. Some come out in the sack, some already have the sack sucked away by the bitch.

I just don't like the oxytocin drug as a clean up thing. If you think she is not quite done with whelping give her white ice-cream or carnation evaporated milk, and it can start things contracting. A lot more naturally, in my opinion.

I just whelped my T litter. so 20 litters over 13 years, all GSDs. 6 bitches, never had one have any issues with any retained placentas. I am not saying it cannot happen. I do think that the possibility is far greater to cause a problem by trying to prevent a possible issue though.

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Last edited by selzer; 03-16-2018 at 02:31 AM.
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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-16-2018, 02:47 AM
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I couldn't agree more...whelped many litters, my own and others, without ever seeing a problem that would require oxytocin. Is there a particular reason for concern that you haven't mentioned?
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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-16-2018, 11:18 AM
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It's like the birth practices in hospitals with women; the more interventions, the more problems. Observe form a distance to make sure things are OK. Animals (and humans too) need peace and quite to birth their babies. I have seen it in a sheep barn; lots of interference during the births of the lambs and problems in bonding and birthing the second ones. As a human doula I advised my friend to just let the sheep be and once we left, sure enough the other sheep, who were shooed out the barn by my friend to give the mother sheep space :/ ,went into the barn as her support team and things were OK.
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-17-2018, 10:08 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you for the responses. I would rather not use oxytocin if I didn't have to.

"The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together; and a little child shall lead them." Isaiah 11:6
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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-18-2018, 01:31 AM Thread Starter
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What are the signs that she has a retained placenta? Any way to check for them? Will a vet be able to see a retained placenta through ultrasound or xray? She finished labor on the 15th, but hasn't had a very good appetite since then. Is it normal for a dog that had a litter a few days ago to not have a good appetite? Discharge is red colored. She's drinking fine. Her stomach is making bubbly sounds.

"The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together; and a little child shall lead them." Isaiah 11:6
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-18-2018, 09:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfebergk9 View Post
What are the signs that she has a retained placenta? Any way to check for them? Will a vet be able to see a retained placenta through ultrasound or xray? She finished labor on the 15th, but hasn't had a very good appetite since then. Is it normal for a dog that had a litter a few days ago to not have a good appetite? Discharge is red colored. She's drinking fine. Her stomach is making bubbly sounds.
Talk to your Vet. If you are having a possible medical issue with your dog call your Vet. You may be missing a symptom that means the difference between this is natural or this is something serious, something your Vet is trained to notice, not people on an internet who can not see or touch your dog. Call your Vet, even if you think it is nothing, especially since it is not just your female's life, but the life of her puppies you may be putting in jeopardy if you just wait and see.
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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-18-2018, 02:28 PM
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How is she doing today? What did your vet say?

It's not the size of the dog in the fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog. Mark Twain

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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-18-2018, 05:01 PM
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She should be having some discharge. Red is not concerning. If the puppies are gaining weight, then she is ok. Are you weighing them twice a day. It is a HUGE job, so give her what she WANTs to eat. She probably ate a lot of placentas while in labor and a lot of bitches are not very hungry for the first day. Not concerning if she is drinking. Check to see if she has a temperature. If her temperature is at 103 or over, that IS concerning. The box can be too warm, or she can have a retained puppy or placenta. Normal temperature is around 101.5 - 102.5, so 103 is a slight temperature.

The more information you have when you call the vet, the better off you will be. And, if at all possible choose a clinic that has a reproductive health department, because ordinary vets do not see enough bitches in whelp anymore, and they do not have the best information to give you.

From what you wrote, I would NOT call my vet unless the further information of temperature and puppies condition warranted it.

Also, puppies DO lose weight or do not gain, generally for the first 24, then they should be in the neighborhood of a 16-20 ounces and they should be gaining about 2 ounces once to twice a day. If after the first 24 hours, they continue to lose weight, then they are in trouble. If some are gaining, and others are standing still, give it another 12 hours, and kind of move the once that seem to be empty up near the rear teats.

Good luck.
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Ramona the Pest, Kojak -- who loves you baby?
Tiny Tinnie, Susie's Uzzi, Kaiah -- The Baby Monster.
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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-20-2018, 11:52 AM Thread Starter
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She should be having some discharge. Red is not concerning. If the puppies are gaining weight, then she is ok. Are you weighing them twice a day. It is a HUGE job, so give her what she WANTs to eat. She probably ate a lot of placentas while in labor and a lot of bitches are not very hungry for the first day. Not concerning if she is drinking. Check to see if she has a temperature. If her temperature is at 103 or over, that IS concerning. The box can be too warm, or she can have a retained puppy or placenta. Normal temperature is around 101.5 - 102.5, so 103 is a slight temperature.

The more information you have when you call the vet, the better off you will be. And, if at all possible choose a clinic that has a reproductive health department, because ordinary vets do not see enough bitches in whelp anymore, and they do not have the best information to give you.

From what you wrote, I would NOT call my vet unless the further information of temperature and puppies condition warranted it.

Also, puppies DO lose weight or do not gain, generally for the first 24, then they should be in the neighborhood of a 16-20 ounces and they should be gaining about 2 ounces once to twice a day. If after the first 24 hours, they continue to lose weight, then they are in trouble. If some are gaining, and others are standing still, give it another 12 hours, and kind of move the once that seem to be empty up near the rear teats.

Good luck.
Thank you, selzer. I think reading your post helped me feel a little better. Puppies are gaining; we weigh them in grams.

"The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together; and a little child shall lead them." Isaiah 11:6
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