Does anyone here actually have a trained protection dog? - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #1 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-06-2016, 09:36 PM Thread Starter
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Does anyone here actually have a trained protection dog?

I'm just wondering if anyone here actually has a professionally trained protection dog. If so, I'm curious to the do's and dont's. What boundaries do you set? What are the dog's boundaries? Just things you absolutely must do, and cannot do with these kinds of dogs.
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post #2 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-07-2016, 03:02 AM
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No PP dogs but I have owned two former police K-9s. I did not keep up with their protection training, but I maintained their obedience which was quite correct.

Both dogs were well behaved an easy to live with. Both were social with humans and ok with other dogs, though my first, after many years of living in harmony, attacked and severely injured my little Sheltie while he was sleeping.

Both dogs were what I would call sharp. My first, a female was not as clear in the head as you would expect for a K-9 and in fact, I found out years later that she had washed out of the K-9 program. I don't know at what stage.

My second K-9 was Czech, more stable and less prone to inappropriate aggression. Though he could get bitey if pushed to do something he didn't want to do. He had super ball drive. I was able to track down his original trainer and found out he was dual purpose, patrol and dope. Nice dog.

Those were my experiences.

I would say start with the best, most clear headed dog you can find that has correct drives and nerve for the work. You also have to find a REPUTABLE trainer who knows what he or she is doing

You can buy a fully trained adult, which is the most practical way to go. The problem is, you won't have the expertise to evaluate the dog properly. A lot of weaker dogs look like tigers on their home turf.

All of your questions should be answered in depth by the person from whom you get the dog. You're going to spending a lot of money--$20K is not out of line. And a responsible seller is going to ensure that you can manage the dog.
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post #3 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-07-2016, 08:04 AM
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There are lots of variations of a "professionally trained protection dog". Please define.
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post #4 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-07-2016, 09:17 AM
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There are lots of variations of a "professionally trained protection dog". Please define.

^^^I agree with this. It can also depend on the dog.

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post #5 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-07-2016, 10:15 AM
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Red was a Sch3 then trained and sold as a Personal Protection Dog to my aunt. My aunt did not keep up any training, not even obedience. I kept up the obedience. This did cause problems as Red became my dog. My two older boys also would work Red in obedience. She listened to us, not my aunt. We inherited her. She was introduced to new people, especially if away from the house BEFORE they touched me. She would intently watch people around me. Any action of my own to touch another person was acceptable, others touching me without an introduction was met with Red getting between us and if they didn't back up a growl. I made sure to introduce people so she knew who could touch me. Once introduced she was fine, still watched, but that was all. Keeping up the obedience is essential. I tried to tell my aunt that not keeping up the obedience and making sure Red listened immediately to her was like having a loaded gun with the safety off.
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post #6 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-08-2016, 07:12 AM Thread Starter
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There are lots of variations of a "professionally trained protection dog". Please define.
I'm not an expert, but I'm not talking about sport dogs. I mean real life situation trained dogs. The Sch meets I went to explained to me that most of what I see are sport dogs. That may offend some people, but he said to me that "just because they bite on the field doesn't mean they will bite during a carjacking or in a dark alleyway".
Was an eye-opening statement to say the least.
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post #7 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-08-2016, 07:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Julian G View Post
I'm not an expert, but I'm not talking about sport dogs. I mean real life situation trained dogs. The Sch meets I went to explained to me that most of what I see are sport dogs. That may offend some people, but he said to me that "just because they bite on the field doesn't mean they will bite during a carjacking or in a dark alleyway".
Was an eye-opening statement to say the least.
Oddly enough I not only assumed this but was told the same thing in conversation. It's going to depend on the dog. IMO a GSD should protect whether trained or not, it's in their breed, they are guarding kind of dogs and very loyal to their own. There will be some that need no training at all and will protect, there will be some that have training for sport and it doesn't go past that and then I'm guessing some that are trained in real life situations. The problem I see is that even the ones that are trained in real life situations the bad guy still has protection gear on which is completely not the case in real life situations.

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post #8 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-08-2016, 07:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Julian G View Post
I'm not an expert, but I'm not talking about sport dogs. I mean real life situation trained dogs. The Sch meets I went to explained to me that most of what I see are sport dogs. That may offend some people, but he said to me that "just because they bite on the field doesn't mean they will bite during a carjacking or in a dark alleyway".
Was an eye-opening statement to say the least.
i've also heard this. that dogs, unless specifically trained, engage in bite inhibition for hesitation when biting into a real human flesh, not a sleeve.

i watched a youtube video of a TV show where owners with strong breeds were asked whether they thought their dog would protect the home when there was an intruder.

there were Rotts, Dobermans, Labs, and Great Danes. Dont recall seeing Shepherds

so this intruder came waltzing into the house, and all dogs initially barked very loud and stood their ground, but the "intruder" talked to them in a frendly voice and walked in in a calm manner, while casually taking stuff from the house

i dont think there were any dog that successfully warded off the intruder and the owners were all very disappointed


my 5m old puppy barks very loudly at the faintest sound of a car door being shut or neighbors walking about but i dont expect him to "defend" me or the house
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post #9 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-08-2016, 08:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Pan_GSD View Post
i've also heard this. that dogs, unless specifically trained, engage in bite inhibition for hesitation when biting into a real human flesh, not a sleeve.

i watched a youtube video of a TV show where owners with strong breeds were asked whether they thought their dog would protect the home when there was an intruder.

there were Rotts, Dobermans, Labs, and Great Danes. Dont recall seeing Shepherds

so this intruder came waltzing into the house, and all dogs initially barked very loud and stood their ground, but the "intruder" talked to them in a frendly voice and walked in in a calm manner, while casually taking stuff from the house

i dont think there were any dog that successfully warded off the intruder and the owners were all very disappointed


my 5m old puppy barks very loudly at the faintest sound of a car door being shut or neighbors walking about but i dont expect him to "defend" me or the house
I agree most dogs wouldn't act. But I'm curious why they didn't simulate an attack on the owners and see then? For the most part, dogs were trained to allow guests in. So a robber would be seen as another guest.
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post #10 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-08-2016, 08:48 AM
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I'm just wondering if anyone here actually has a professionally trained protection dog. If so, I'm curious to the do's and dont's. What boundaries do you set? What are the dog's boundaries? Just things you absolutely must do, and cannot do with these kinds of dogs.
Hi Julian,

I am brand new to this forum, and your question is an important one for me. I've settled on a GSD, since I owned one as a child and loved him to death, and I think that while GSDs are not the best at any particular activity, they are probably in the top three at everything, making them a winning choice overall.

I am looking for a PP dog when I retire and return to the States. Investigating the various trainers, breeders, and importers is just bewildering. And the price points are so wide I feel like I'm trying to buy diamonds. On Ebay. Blindfolded.

I've been told that K9s should not be around strangers (invitees to your home, no less), and that they are fine around strangers, properly introduced.

Sch III -trained dogs are great, but also that, while impressive on the field, they cannot really be called PP dogs and must be retrained at great expense.

I've been told that German-sourced GSDs have lost their originality, and that Czech-sourced GSDs are the "only way to go." Oh, and that American AKC individuals are generally no good for PP duties.

At some point, I would like to find an actual owner of a PP GSD to understand what I can expect and who I can reasonably trust.

Good question......Thanks.

Stephen.
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