Please tell me it gets easier - German Shepherd Dog Forums
 58Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 36 (permalink) Old 07-30-2016, 02:05 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Sparky BV's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Northern California
Posts: 34
Unhappy Please tell me it gets easier

In April I lost the love of my life in the dog world, a female show line that was barely 3 yrs old, smart, easy to train, easy to live with and my constant companion 24/7. Her life was cut short due to a very aggressive breast cancer that spread to her lymph nodes and I had to let her go within 3 months of discovering her condition. I was extremely heart broken. The trainer where I use to take her for training heard about my girl and offered to give me a male working line pup out of extremely nice blood lines. Having wanted a male, working line pup for some time, I accepted his offer. For the most part I really love my boy. He is a big, strong boy (somewhere around 73-75 pounds) at barely 9 mths. Not only is this my first working line pup, but I am not exactly young, I am 60 yrs old and decided it is time for me to try my hand at trialing my pup. For the past 3 weeks he has been challenging me something awful. He growls, bares his teeth, and will flat out try to bite me when giving him corrections on the field during bite work. It has gotten to the point the trainer is having to choke him up, using a dominant collar, and basically not give him a bite except for one when he calms down as a reward then put him in his crate. He has also started challenging me at home with his toys. I really don't want to give him back, I have never given up on a dog, but sometimes I feel like I am not the right person for this pup. Please tell me it gets better as the training progresses and he matures. I am already attached to him and really don't want to give up on him
Sparky BV is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 36 (permalink) Old 07-30-2016, 02:23 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 116
This is just my opinion but it really sounds like you needto have a “heart to heart” session with your dog. He is testing his limits andYOU need to set them. If this was my dog I would back tie him on a solid polewith a collar that isn’t going to break and a dominate dog collar. I would thenset him up in a situation that normally causes him to growl at you when he doesgrowl I would crank on the dominate dog collar until he stops the behavior thatyou don’t want. I have found that this method will quickly reinforce the limitsthat you want set. I would caution you to not do this in front of the generalpublic as it can appear very harsh.
Coastie01 is offline  
post #3 of 36 (permalink) Old 07-30-2016, 02:28 PM
Crowned Member
 
Stevenzachsmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Maryland
Posts: 5,764
First, I am so sorry for the loss of your girl. It is always hard to lose them, but when they are so young, it is really tough.

My shepherds have only been shelter dogs - probably an entire conglomeration of lines. I can't really help you with the working lines. I'm sure someone will pop on who can. Just know that the board gets a little slow on the weekends.

What I will say, is that being overwhelmed and in over your head is not a good place to be. You deserve a dog that you can enjoy. Your dog deserves a home that can work him to his full potential. I'm not saying that isn't you. I don't know. What I mean is, if you did have to give him back, hard as it might be, it could be the best thing for both of you.

Sorry I can't be more helpful.

Hugs!

Jan
Shelby 9-2-14
Natty Boh 6-27-12
Annie 1998 - 8-2-12 RIP
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Stevenzachsmom is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 36 (permalink) Old 07-30-2016, 02:35 PM
Crowned Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 4,389
Yeah, it can get better. Protection handling can be tough. Its more technical then people realize. Pay attention to the trainer. This is one of those times where there isn't much that's helpful online. The balance of things you need just has to come from in person, skilled helpers and trainer. The last thing you want to do is try and base your training on comparisons to other people's dogs.
Steve Strom is offline  
post #5 of 36 (permalink) Old 07-30-2016, 02:39 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 850
9 months old is the terrible teenage phase. I would stop doing bite work honestly. Trainers sometimes are too harsh with pups that are too young. Take all his toys away, when he behaves let him play with a toy. He needs to know that they are YOUR toys.
I would also stop feeding him by bowl, it may be hard since you're 60 years old but I would strictly hand feed him all his meals throughout the day. Make him sit or down then feed him, wait until he does something good (can be something as little as making eye contact with you) and feed him.
gsdluvr likes this.
Julian G is offline  
post #6 of 36 (permalink) Old 07-30-2016, 02:47 PM
Crowned Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 4,389
Quote:
Originally Posted by Julian G View Post
9 months old is the terrible teenage phase. I would stop doing bite work honestly. Trainers sometimes are too harsh with pups that are too young. Take all his toys away, when he behaves let him play with a toy. He needs to know that they are YOUR toys.
I would also stop feeding him by bowl, it may be hard since you're 60 years old but I would strictly hand feed him all his meals throughout the day. Make him sit or down then feed him, wait until he does something good (can be something as little as making eye contact with you) and feed him.
And then what? Take him back out when he's older and that much stronger and harder to control? I like talking about training almost everything, but there are things that you defer to what the helpers and training director are advising.
Steve Strom is offline  
post #7 of 36 (permalink) Old 07-30-2016, 02:53 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Sparky BV's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Northern California
Posts: 34
Thanks Coastie01 for the advice :-) That is basically what the trainer did this past Sunday when he tried to go after me for correcting him on his "out". He was back tied and we had a leash on his dominate collar. The trainer did the correction while I gave the commands. At one point my pup almost passed out. It is very hard for me to watch this so I am hoping it gets easier over training and time :-) And yes, definately not something I would try to do with anyone that does not understand this type of bloodlines. I would be arrested for dog abuse, lol
Sparky BV is offline  
post #8 of 36 (permalink) Old 07-30-2016, 02:57 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 116
It is hard to watch the first few times but remember thatyou are doing it for his own good. Unchecked aggression like that is going tolead to him biting someone and having to be put down in the long run. My friendhas a dog that she competed in regional last year and hopes to get to nationalsthis year that had the exact problem that you are going through now. She didthe same thing I said and he is now an awesome dog.
Sparky BV likes this.
Coastie01 is offline  
post #9 of 36 (permalink) Old 07-30-2016, 03:00 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 850
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparky BV View Post
Thanks Coastie01 for the advice :-) That is basically what the trainer did this past Sunday when he tried to go after me for correcting him on his "out". He was back tied and we had a leash on his dominate collar. The trainer did the correction while I gave the commands. At one point my pup almost passed out. It is very hard for me to watch this so I am hoping it gets easier over training and time :-) And yes, definately not something I would try to do with anyone that does not understand this type of bloodlines. I would be arrested for dog abuse, lol
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Strom View Post
And then what? Take him back out when he's older and that much stronger and harder to control? I like talking about training almost everything, but there are things that you defer to what the helpers and training director are advising.
So I'm new to the world of working lines, but you're saying that it's fine to have a pup almost pass out as a form of training?
Julian G is offline  
post #10 of 36 (permalink) Old 07-30-2016, 03:01 PM
Moderator
 
dogma13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: michigan
Posts: 5,616
If you don't have the energy level and aren't enjoying the challenge of working with a difficult dog then give him up to someone who does.Both of you would be so much happier.I bought what will be my last puppy at age 59.I carefully chose a pup with a mellow temperament and medium energy level.Rally and OB have been enjoyable activities for us.

Terri

Samson Blk/Slvr GSD. RN
Misty Husky Mix
Z-Z Terrier/potato mix
Devo Yorkie Mix at the bridge
Dakota Wht GSD at the bridge
dogma13 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome