Need to rehome 8 year old white shepherd mix in Evansville, IN area - Page 2 - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #11 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-13-2018, 03:21 PM
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I would get the dog evaluated by a professional. Don’t base your decsion on your dogs life on a forum. I have been to many reputable dog rescues who place dogs for adoption was not to be homes with older or no kids. Bide a wee was One of these adoption facilities is where we adopted and I was raised with dogs that fit our family. We adopted once a dog from this rescue that we were warned the dog was highly aggressive with other dogs. We later added a poodle and a collie pup to the family not to mention cats bunnies and birds nor strange dogs were isSues. so there is that. not that I recommend this dog be homed with a kid. I’m just saying there may be certain dynamics that just don’t work. I hate to say many dogs do bite or are capable of biting. It is why people must really need to do there homework when they get their family dog.
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Last edited by Jenny720; 03-13-2018 at 03:23 PM.
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post #12 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-13-2018, 04:06 PM
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He just turned 8 in February, and yes he is large, 75-80 pounds. He is beautiful, all white with shepherd ears and snout, thicker northern breed coat and curly tail, one light tan spot on his back

In these kinds of situations, do behaviorists do any good? Can this be classified as a behavior or is this just a part of him that will never change? He did some training with Chopper when we first got him and it was clear to us that he does not have the same intelligence or mind set of a GSD. He is more impulsive and really just is a completely different dog than Chopper was
Who is going to take him while he works with a behaviorist? We don’t have enough information to know if he can be fixed or not. I had a biter who had to be managed all his life, but he never went after a family member or anyone he knew, only strangers. I would not have kept that dog with small children in the house,
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post #13 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-13-2018, 04:54 PM Thread Starter
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I’m mentioning a behaviorist just so I know that I’ve exhausted all of my options, and was just asking for input on whether someone had experience with working with one or not. Obviously if we decide to go that route, my husband and myself would take him or the behaviorist would come to our home to evaluate
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post #14 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-13-2018, 04:58 PM
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I had very babies learning to walk and our first gsd was very arthritic gsd at times in pain. I separated them in my house as could not always watch them. He had never bit the kids but I do know he would not be happy if they fell or crawled on him so to prevent that or put him in a situation -I kept them separated. I’m sure and hope you can comfortably separate your dog - gated off room or enclosed room - from your son in while the dogs is evaluated and you can figure out your future plans.
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post #15 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-13-2018, 07:18 PM
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Re: keeping them seperate: If I'm understanding the timeline correctly your dog lived with your children without incident for about 3 years, then went another 10 months without another incident? What is your property like? Could you build an outdoor kennel with shelter, a secure run/fence and a locked door/gate? We live in a fairly secluded place on 5 acres, if it were me, I might just make him an outdoor dog and spend lots of time with him outside, and maybe bring him inside in the evenings/mornings when the kids were asleep. I realize this isn't the perfect life for a dog, but if you can keep your children (and other children) safe, maybe he could be managed that way. I'm sorry you have to make such a tough decision, but whatever happens, you have to put the safety of your kids first.
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post #16 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-13-2018, 07:25 PM
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OP, I went through a similar situation about 25 years ago. I had the dog put down. It still hurts to this day but it was the most responsible thing to do. Re-homing him with problems like these will put the dog at risk for abuse, neglect and loneliness in a new "home". Another thing to consider is that who will adopt a dog like this: hoarders who "rescue" everything that is still alive, no matter what, dog-fighting rings (I am sure he is a great candidate for them)?
Please be aware of impostors, flippers, who come across as a nice family but will sell him to whoever wants him for whatever purpose.
I agree with others that the kindest and safest thing to do is to let him go to the Rainbow bridge where he will be safe and free. You will be more relaxed and your kids safe
Thank you for asking us. I wish you strength and appreciate to put your kids' safety first. I think it is impossible to keep young children and the dog apart for 100%
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Last edited by wolfy dog; 03-13-2018 at 07:29 PM.
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post #17 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-13-2018, 07:34 PM
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Every situation/experience is different and can’t be compared to someone on here with their personal experience so go seek out professional advise.
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post #18 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-13-2018, 08:21 PM
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I am new to this forum, but wanted to jump in with my own observations.

This dog has bitten not once, but twice, and, the second bite was more severe than the first. Fortunately, neither bite was catastrophic. The next one very well may be catastrophic especially if the dog continues the pattern of biting children. As much as I hate it, I agree that the best route here is a calm and peaceful goodbye at the vet's office.

Even if you were to find the right home, with no children or pets, chances are that you are not going to find a family that is experienced enough to handle a "biter" and that endangers this dog, as well as countless other people.

Baby gates, outside kennels may seem appropriate from an emotional state, but baby gates fall and children open gates. If the dog is not safe to have around the children while you are supervising, the dog is just not safe to have around any children.

It is not fair to cage the dog up and separate him from his family........it could possibly make things worse and cause a higher level of aggression, imo. It's not fair to the child to have areas of his own home that are not safe for him to be in, and it's not fair for mom and dad to have to deal with that kind of worry all the time. Euthanasia is rough for any reason, but to have to put down a healthy dog just is rotten. I have had to do it, and it REALLY is awful. But, sometimes it is the most fair thing to do, for everyone involved.

I am so sorry that you are having to make such a decision. My heart goes out to you no matter what you decide.
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post #19 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-13-2018, 08:44 PM
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Every situation/experience is different and can’t be compared to someone on here with their personal experience so go seek out professional advise.
And emotion cannot be allowed to override common sense, not where safety is involved.
Reputable rescues do not take dogs with bite histories. Dogs advertised as no kids/no small animals tested poorly in those areas in the shelter or rescue, after intake. For liability reasons they cannot rehome dogs with known bite histories.
As has been said before, in this thread and others, people who can handle this type of dog don't want them. People who want them should not have them.

Training is sometimes a good option but with a preschooler and a toddler in the house and a dog with no care if the adults are right there I would never risk it.

This is a heart breaking decision, I feel for all involved. If it were my dog I would have it euthanized. Sooner then later, before it has the opportunity to do something that will negate all the fun and loving memories.
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post #20 of 42 (permalink) Old 03-13-2018, 09:56 PM
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I worked with a behaviorist expecting to fix the dog, but he was not able to. I kept him and managed him, but as I said there were no small children in the home. This only my experience but it’s very difficult to find someone good. I went through a lot of trainers first. It was expensive. I could have bought a quality dog from a top breeder for less than I spent trying to fix my rescue. He never tried to bite a family member or a close friend. I could not invite anyone over unless I went through a very complex routine to soothe him and convince him he was safe. Then we had the opposite problems when he liked someone, he would not leave them alone. I could not completely train that out of him either. Are you prepared to spend a lot of money and time and maybe still not fix your dog?
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