2yo GSD with papers needs a good home (Raleigh, NC) - Page 2 - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #11 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-13-2017, 11:15 AM
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Congratulations on the new babies! Are you having twins?--that is exciting!

Thor looks like a wonderful dog, and I hope you find the perfect home for him if that is what you decide to do.

I just wanted to add that I have 2 young GSDs (2.5 years and 1 year), a toddler (20 months), and we just welcomed a newborn on April 27th. I couldn't be any more proud of our GSDs, Asher and Levi, for how they have acted around the newborn. They barely showed any interest in him at all, just a quick sniff, and then they went off about their business. The dogs adore my toddler and he loves them. His eyes light up when he sees the dogs or any animal. In fact, he imitated the dogs barking before he started talking.

I won't claim that the GSDs have never knocked my toddler down (he does a pretty good job of falling all on his own)! But the dogs have never knocked him down purposely or with force. At my husband's request, we have a playroom that the dogs and cats aren't allowed in--so we do keep them separate at times, and we have crates and an ex-pen when we need them. We also have a large fenced yard so on nice days we put the dogs outside if we need some space. For instance when the toddler is eating, he likes to toss food down to the dogs, which I try to discourage.

Though they are far from perfect, I did a lot of training with the dogs before each of the babies came home, but are the dogs going to get as much training and attention as they did before the kids were born?--realistically, probably not. I would love to compete in rally or advanced obedience, or even just get their CGC, but with work (part time now) and young kids, I don't see how that is possible. Maybe in a few years. But we still find time for some informal training at home, I take the kids out in the stroller and we go on walks, and we are lucky enough to have a couple acres and so the kids and dogs and I spend time outside playing.

We've only had the newborn a couple of weeks, so we are still adjusting. Of course we are overwhelmed at times. Things will be easier when I get a full night's sleep, I imagine, and when we figure out a new routine.

Having a toddler, a newborn, dogs, and other responsibilities is hard. And it would be even harder with twins! No judgement from me if you decide to re-home your pup. He looks like a wonderful dog and someone will be lucky to have him.
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Last edited by sebrench; 05-13-2017 at 11:17 AM.
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post #12 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-13-2017, 03:26 PM
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I am glad you are using this forum. Hope he won't be on Craigs List. He looks and sounds like a great family dog and you have done a good job with him already. I hope you have considered giving him up very carefully as it is hard to raise another one like that later. He is already 2 years old, so passed the crazy stage. If this dog has enriched your life, so will he with your children. Nowadays everything seems to be about children and parents sacrifice their own lives. It is OK to let them be once in a while so you can work and enjoy your dog. We raised three little ones among dogs and pups. But dogs were my outlet. Kids will benefit greatly from living with a dog like yours and yes, once in while they will knocked over but kids live close to the floor and are flexible and resilient. It teaches them to look out. As a kid I wish I had a dog like that in my childhood. What a treasure he could be for your kids. Just wanted to throw this out here.
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post #13 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-14-2017, 10:38 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Twyla View Post
Have you spoken with his breeder? Most contracts specify that the breeder is first to call in situations such as this.
I have not, for two reasons. First, because we got him when we lived in Fl and I was hoping to find a local home so that I could meet the new family ect. and second I wanted to avoid him sitting at the breeders for a time period and then changing homes for a third time to a new family.

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Originally Posted by selzer View Post
I don't think you can sell your dog on this site. I understand the money is not what is important to you, but rules are rules. I think you could probably list him under non-urgent rescue.
This thread is in the non urgent rescue section and in the stickies section it recommends asking for a relocation fee. To the best of my knowledge I'm following teh rules.

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Originally Posted by llombardo View Post
I've had a long week and I'm tired, so while this might sound rude, it's the truth.

You do realize that kids fall on their butts and get hurt and that's ok? Does the dog growl at children? Does he nip or mouth children? Other then being a big pup that can get excited, is he so vicious that he will kill a child?

I seriously hope he goes to a good home, but I'm also seriously disturbed at the reason he has to go. Dogs are a commitment, at the same time so are kids but millions of people have kids and dogs and make it work. Giving up a dog after a couple years because kids come along is a poor excuse. I'm sure that kids were always part of the plan?

I have one that was given up because of the same reason. All he needed was a little training. The dog is a goofball but he adores kids. In the 4 yrs I've had him he has done nothing but love every kid that he comes across. Of course I put the work into him as I do all my dogs because I know that in the near future I will have grandkids coming and going. Those kids will love and respect the dogs and vice versa. I'm so excited to have the two together in the future. I'm quite sure that a toddler will fall due to the dogs and I'm also quite sure that they understand they have to get back up and do it all over again.its a good life lesson that I have every intention to teach.
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Originally Posted by llombardo View Post
I've had a long week and I'm tired, so while this might sound rude, it's the truth.

You do realize that kids fall on their butts and get hurt and that's ok? Does the dog growl at children? Does he nip or mouth children? Other then being a big pup that can get excited, is he so vicious that he will kill a child?

I seriously hope he goes to a good home, but I'm also seriously disturbed at the reason he has to go. Dogs are a commitment, at the same time so are kids but millions of people have kids and dogs and make it work. Giving up a dog after a couple years because kids come along is a poor excuse. I'm sure that kids were always part of the plan?

I have one that was given up because of the same reason. All he needed was a little training. The dog is a goofball but he adores kids. In the 4 yrs I've had him he has done nothing but love every kid that he comes across. Of course I put the work into him as I do all my dogs because I know that in the near future I will have grandkids coming and going. Those kids will love and respect the dogs and vice versa. I'm so excited to have the two together in the future. I'm quite sure that a toddler will fall due to the dogs and I'm also quite sure that they understand they have to get back up and do it all over again.its a good life lesson that I have every intention to teach.
I'm seriously disturbed that you know what's best for my family. No he has never nipped or been aggressive with my daughter but he has accidentally trampled her several times and because my daughter is so small (lower 1-4 percentile in weight) it could easily send her to the hospital. Yes, we are expecting twins and obviously they too will be tiny and will require a lot of attention. Finding him a new home is better than the alternative of keeping him segregated from the rest of us at all times.

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Originally Posted by lou76384 View Post
Would love to talk to you about rehoming this handsome guy. We live outside of a small town in Texas. We have two small dogs, ages 6 and 13, that have been with us since puppies. Our GS died a few years ago at 16 years old. Our children are grown. We would be interested in traveling to meet this handsome guy.
I was hoping to find someone a little more local so I could know as much as possible about them to make sure it's a good fit. If I'm unable to do so, I'll message you and we can go from there. Thanks
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post #14 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-14-2017, 09:30 PM
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You might try contacting Southeast German Shepherd Rescue for help with finding a good home for Thor. I believe they will take owner surrenders under certain circumstances. SGSG rescue's central hub is Raleigh. It's worth a try. Contact info and instructions are listed on the FAQ page.

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post #15 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-15-2017, 10:28 AM
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"No he has never nipped or been aggressive with my daughter but he has accidentally trampled her several times and because my daughter is so small (lower 1-4 percentile in weight) it could easily send her to the hospital."

I am sorry you were offended by some of our responses. I assure that was not our intention. We are only trying to offer our experiences with kids and dogs - give you things to think about. Just as we have all felt overwhelmed at times, we have also felt regret. We aren't trying to change your mind, but are sharing our perspectives of dogs with kids.

I copied your post about your daughter being very small. That is a valid concern. My son was very small. He wasn't even on the charts. He was born with a bone abnormality called achondroplasia, which causes dwarfism. (It is the same type of dwarfism as the actor who plays Tyrion Lanaster on Game of Thrones.) Because of disproportion in his arms, legs, head and body, my son had to learn everything differently than average sized children. Crawling was impossible. Standing from the floor, these kids do something called 'jack-knifing' - legs straight and pushing into a stand. He didn't walk independently until he was almost three. His specialists' main word of advice to us was, "Protect the cervical spine." By preschool, at 4.5 years old, my son was 24" tall. It was hard not to be protective, but I had to let him live his life. That included large dogs and horses. lol! At 6, we started volunteering with a GSD rescue. He was the 'kid' tester for every single dog. He was perfect, because he was toddler size, but did not act like a toddler. He also volunteered at a horse rescue, where the horses responded very well to him, especially the mini horses. Not sure why that was, but even the naughty ones were well behaved with him.

All I am trying to say is that kids are very resilient - even the little ones. I let my little one fly. Sometimes I had to hold my breath. He is 19 now and finishing up his freshman year of college. He chose to go to a large university with a huge campus. Of course he did. lol!

Just my perspective, which you are free to ignore. I wish you the best whatever decision you make. And - Huge Congratulations on the pending arrival of your twins!

Jan
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post #16 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-15-2017, 02:02 PM
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There are times when life-choices, major decisions shouldn't be made, or at least, should be given some time. If there is a death in the family, for instance, or loss of job, it can make it hard to see beyond the puzzle piece we are currently parked on. We can't always see the big picture. Pregnancy with all of its hormones can be a time when we rush into some decisions that we might really regret down the line. I wouldn't really know first hand, as I have no children, but from what my mom tells me, and my siblings that seems to be the case for many of us (women).

I got a call a few months ago from a man who told me he had to give his dog back to me. I said, "Ok, what's going on." He said that his other dog, his 5 year old GSD bit his wife. Now with grand children, they are afraid to have the dogs. Well, I talked to him, and he was going to call me the next day to let me know when we could get together to take the dog. I did not try to dissuade him, when people's minds are made up...

But I did not get a call the next day. The following day was Wednesday, and no call. I was thinking maybe they thought better of it. On Friday I got nervous and thought maybe he dropped her at the pound too. So I called him and talked for quite a while.

What happened was the lady stepped on the dog and was nipped, not sure if it broke the skin or not, but what was a bite on Monday, was a nip -- mostly an accident on Friday. he did not want the dog put down. I think it must of broken the skin because animal control was quarantining the dog. He found someone willing to take the boy if Animal Control would release him -- I did not follow up with that, because I didn't want to hear it went south.

But he told me the girl (that he got from me) had never been aggressive, and she follows the grand children around in the yard, and loves them. They decided to keep her.

I've rehomed a number of young dogs this year, most were my own, that fell out of my breeding program for one reason or another. Nice dogs, but better off with a family of their own, 2 were 8 months, a 2.5 year old boy, a few girls who were almost 3, and a 7 year old female went to someone who wanted an older dog. There was also a 1 year old whose owner has been through 4 surgeries already this year on his knee and finally called me up and told me he had to let her go. And another fellow with a dog that will be 3 in August, happened a week ago, he's moving and can only find rentals in the new place that allow dogs under 40 pounds.

Most of the dogs I sent to a trainer first, who had them for a couple of days. I wanted a fresh set of eyes seeing the dog in an unfamiliar situation so we could make good decisions on who the dogs went to. My dogs get some training, but not a ton of socialization, some of them have been with their dam for years. So, that means, they never got that burst of confidence that a young pup gets when he leaves his dam and littermates and has to sink or swim with a new family.

Anyway, the eight month olds have no trouble bonding with the trainer or transitioning into their new homes. Didn't expect any, but I was interested in whether they showed the same traits in the trainer's home as they did in mine.

Oscar, the 2.5 year old boy, was in with Odie who is 9 almost 10 years. He is doing great in his new home.

The three year old females were in with their dam, one is more outgoing and the other more reserved. The outgoing one went to the trainer with one of the puppies and did great, and transitioned great. Unfortunately the other did not go to the trainer first. She went to her sister's new home, and met her new people who took her away with them. I was so worried because she seemed even more uncertain that day when I took her to be groomed. But after running with her sister a little, I sat down and chatted with the new owner to be. She came up and sat between us. Then her kids came over and started petting her. She visibly relaxed. I left with my girls, and they took a photo of them surrounding her. They love her. She's doing great.

The older dog, I delivered into a group of people that she never met. She was great with all of them, including their toddler. There were about 10 people in the basement. My nieces and the puppy, the lady her husband and baby, then my friend who owned the house and a few other people. The dog was fine with all of them because I was there. Loved the baby, and the puppy who she had not met until that day. I relaxed immediately since the three girls were absolutely fine with the dog. And after about an hour or so, they packed Dolly into the back seat with the car seat and their toddler, and went for a 4 hour car trip to their home, where Dolly had to make another introduction, a 9 year old female Labrador. I suggested they make that introduction after the child was in bed for the night and to be very careful with them together. She had no misgivings and showed no aggression to other people, but my friend had brought one of her dogs down, a large male that came gallumping down the stairs and right up into her, and she wanted nothing to do with him.

I was worried about her. But they actually took my advice (a lot of people simply do not) and introduced them without the baby being present, and it was a little hairy. The lab was a little scared of her, but after a couple of days they were doing ok together. I did suggest not leaving them together unsupervised. They are both females.

A month or two later, they said she isn't friendly with strangers and they are ok with that, she is awesome with their daughter and them. I was surprised about the other people though. I had gotten Dolly back at almost six months, after a really negative experience. I got her back seriously injured. I had to let her heal, and she wanted nothing to do with me or other people. But I earned her trust by giving her space and time and being trustworthy. To the point that Dolly was very solid around me, got her CGC no problem, sweet dog, easy to handle, wonderful with my nieces, very loyal. I wouldn't have given her up, but it seemed like a good home for her presented, and it was better for her. Well, it is possible, that she doesn't trust them yet around strangers. It may be that she will relax in the coming months.

Last two. Not my dogs, but my pups. The 1 year old, I went to get from the guy and drove direct to the trainer. She was very thin. The guy said she wouldn't eat, and gave me the bag of food. I fed her burgers in the car and she was eating for me. She ate for the trainer. She went to her new owner, who lives on a farm, and is going to college. He takes her with him, to class. She sits through physics class a 1 year old pup. His aunt told me he's put 10 or 15 pounds on her. Good.

And the boy last week. I picked him up from the moving owner and drove him to where the new owners were with the trainer. The new owner would be living with his aunt for a few months and would need to get along with her 4 adult dogs. He's intact, 2 of her males are intact, one neutered and the bitch is spayed. I stuck around to watch. The dog was nervous. He is the same age as your dog -- will be 3 in August. He was following shadows when the other dogs were not present. Very interested in the other dogs who we introduced one at a time for the youngsters -- 2 year olds, and then added the boy who is going to be 5 this week, and then the older bitch. We had concern about the shadows. She called the previous owners, and asked about it, and he said he thought it was a boredom thing. By Friday, she said the dog was fantastic. That he is chasing the ball now, not shadows. The training with the trainer is going really well, running with the other dogs, everyone is getting on, and the boy feels a lot safer with the dog in his rooms above the garage.

The reason I put all this down is to give you some ideas of things to think about in rehoming your boy. It might be helpful to have a trainer evaluate the dog and give you an idea of what kind of person or people he should go to. Sometimes when we see a dog all the time in a familiar setting we don't see things, or overlook them as so ordinary that they are nothing. A fresh set of experienced eyes can be very helpful.

Also, you want to find people who want more than just have a GSD. You want people who want to work with/train your dog, give him a good life, and that means do stuff with him, bond with him, and training builds the bond.

Your dog will get over the change in ownership within a week or so. The older they are, the longer it takes for them to completely shift from the old owners to the new. They may be looking for you. That's normal. They do not hate you for leaving them. Don't worry about that.

It is not really hard on the dog if done well. Most of us do not see the need to rehome the dog because children are coming. But we all have a different ability to manage dogs, and to manage kids, and to manage kids and dogs, and everything else life throws at us.

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Ramona the Pest, Kojak -- who loves you baby?
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post #17 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-15-2017, 02:34 PM
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Mgrande, I wonder if you have an adult brother or sister or cousin who could keep your dog for you for a few years. You could pay for his food and upkeep. And your growing family could go visit in a highly controlled way. Its just a thought.
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post #18 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-15-2017, 11:30 PM
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I totally understand. However I would be happy to provide you with references. Vernon is a small town and most people know us. I have been looking for a GS for a few months. We live outside of town on approx. 30 acres. We have been looking for a GS but prefer to have an adult that has some training and would continue with classes. I manage over 100 rental properties and want a companion and protection dog. My husband is retired oil/gas investor. Our pets are part of our family. If I can provide any other information, please let me know. I wish you the best of luck in whatever you decide. Congratulations on the babies!
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post #19 of 34 (permalink) Old 05-28-2017, 01:29 PM
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He's beautiful if I didn't have a new puppy I'd definitely be interested I live in Greenville NC about an hour away fro Raleigh. Good luck finding him a home.
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post #20 of 34 (permalink) Old 06-01-2017, 04:46 PM
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Did you find a good hone for Thor...or perhaps decide to keep him? We had Trouble when our first (and second) were born. She was 104 pounds and had never really been around kids. We were very worried. There were a few times where iur youngest was inadvertently bumped down, but in the end we would all tell you he was definitely better off having her than not.
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