Pulling while on leash - German Shepherd Dog Forums
 8Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-09-2016, 11:11 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 77
Pulling while on leash

Have a 1 year old who pulls for family member when they watch her. She listens to my wife and kids while on leash. When my paretpnts watch her she is pulling them trying to go after other dogs or people. She is not aggressive but just wants to see them.

When my parents are with us she listens so not sure how to resolve this issue as it's not happening when we are around.
GSD316 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-10-2016, 12:13 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 77
For the leash, it's just a standard flexi 15' leash. Was wondering if harnesses / leashes would work to prohibit pulling.
GSD316 is offline  
post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-10-2016, 12:34 AM
Member
 
ThroughYska'sEyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Missouri
Posts: 73
I recommend a well fitted prong collar 100%, has she been trained or taken to a trainer?

my girl was the same way, I tried a harness, head collar and even a halti harness and nothing worked. I took her to a trainer for two weeks while I was out of the country (not for the pulling but for basic obedience) and they used a prong on her. now she doesn't even pull when using a soft flat collar. They are honestly one of the best training tools i've owned. Match that with an awesome trainer that teaches them to heel and you got a winner.
Chip18 and Themusicmanswife like this.
ThroughYska'sEyes is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-10-2016, 12:53 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 77
Few people I met at our dog training class also used a prong collar. Thanks for the input just trying to get different suggestions. She is currently wearing a flat collar. Couple other people recommended a dominant dog collar instead of pronged collar. Never heard of this collar but did visit Leerburg website to get additional information.
GSD316 is offline  
post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-10-2016, 02:18 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 850
Quote:
Originally Posted by GSD316 View Post
Few people I met at our dog training class also used a prong collar. Thanks for the input just trying to get different suggestions. She is currently wearing a flat collar. Couple other people recommended a dominant dog collar instead of pronged collar. Never heard of this collar but did visit Leerburg website to get additional information.
Both can be used for leash pulling. I try not to use it but sometimes you just have a puller. A dominant dog collar is basically a slip/choke collar re-branded. Despite how it might look I think a prong collar is a lot safer. Seems like I've been doing this a lot lately but here you go, your parent's shouldn't risk their safety and the dog's by a pulling 1 yr old pup,

https://www.amazon.com/Herm-Sprenger...r+prong+collar

Leerburg Dog Training | How to Fit a Prong Collar

You should fit it higher on the neck but make sure it's not too tight. Should fix the pulling in no time.
Themusicmanswife likes this.
Julian G is offline  
post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-10-2016, 08:02 AM
Master Member
 
Bramble's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Western, NY
Posts: 756
I wouldn't have your parents use a prong collar unless they know how to. Ineffective or ill timed corrections won't help and may confuse or frustrate the dog. Get rid of the flexi lead, these things teach a dog to pull against pressure rather than give to it. If she walks well for you then she has likely simply learned she can get away with pulling with your parents because they don't know how to address it. What method did you use to stop pulling? Have your parents do the same. Teach them what to do when she starts to pull. Also make sure they have good control of her at other times. If they ask her to sit does she listen right away or ignore them?
Deb likes this.
Bramble is offline  
post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-10-2016, 10:08 AM
Deb
Knighted Member
 
Deb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2,388
I wouldn't have your parents use a prong collar unless they know how to. Ineffective or ill timed corrections won't help and may confuse or frustrate the dog. Get rid of the flexi lead, these things teach a dog to pull against pressure rather than give to it.

I agree with Bramble. Incorrect use could lead to bigger problems. She walks fine for your family, but not your parents. Do your parents have a yard or do they have to walk her on lead? Perhaps taking her to your parents and having them walk her while you can see them and her not knowing your there so you can see what is exactly going on? Then you can help show them what they need to do to have her listen to them. Like Bramble asked, does she listen to them at all?
Deb is offline  
post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-10-2016, 10:20 AM
Crowned Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: ontario -
Posts: 13,917
TRAINING. there is no substitution no way around it .

this can help with the basic no pull which then allows you to fine tune walking into a well mannered heel - attentive to the walker without going into exaggerated sport version.

No Pull Leash | Shop No Pull Dog Leashes | ThunderShirt

Thunder Shirt puts out some good quality products.
Getting the dog closer to being "on board" takes away the resistance and oppostiion , making it easier to do the training.

the GSD isn't going to be obedient to every family member to the same degree.

this may be the case with the parents - so this leash will stop the dog from taking extra advantage of them , ensuring more walks because both dog and walkers are having a positive experience.

you have to do training and not rely on equipment
Chip18 likes this.

Carmen

**********


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by carmspack; 11-10-2016 at 10:23 AM.
carmspack is offline  
post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-10-2016, 12:30 PM
Knighted Member
 
Galathiel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: East Texas
Posts: 2,221
I've actually done the no-pull method (thundershirt leash) with just my regular leash. I just clipped it on, ran the leash down the spine to just behind the legs and then looped it around the chest and back through. It makes a loop around the dog's chest and is an unusual sensation to them when it snugs up (doesn't hurt them). Was useful when we first went to training and I was juggling a bunch of things with an overstimulated dog excited about all the other dogs and people.

Xan Varik von Fernheim (born 4/3/13)
Galathiel is offline  
post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 11-10-2016, 03:01 PM
Member
 
ThroughYska'sEyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Missouri
Posts: 73
I personally feel that no pull leashes, harness, and collars only mask the problem instead of fixing it.

Like carmspack said, Training is the only way to actually fix the pulling. Once my girl learned to heel she didn't pull, but I still don't walk her on just a flat collar. I can and she does fine but Prong Collars allow you to have that training tool to correct when needed.

The others are also right when saying correcting at the wrong time or on accident can cause further problems but honestly I feel just for walking it would be fine for your parents to walk her on a prong collar after she's been trained as long as you educate them on it a bit. i.e. Don't yank it about or make sudden movements.

Once she's learned to walk properly or heel then if she pulls, just the pressure of the prongs will more than likely put her back into place and a light snap of the collar will let her know that she's out of line.

Because my dog was taught to Heel all I have to say is "Heel" when she began to go ahead of me and she falls back into place. If she doesnt I say "Heel" again and snapped the collar lightly and that usually gets her attention.

Also just so you're not confused this is casual heeling not competitive. It just means the dog walks at your left, with their shoulder at your leg (how you probably want her to walk) They can look around, have a loose leash and be a doggo but also will look to you to know when its okay to go off and sniff, go ahead, or fall behind. My dog also sits when I stand still which I find extremely helpful since she's still young and full of energy.
Chip18 likes this.
ThroughYska'sEyes is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome