Mold Detection - German Shepherd Dog Forums
 
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-27-2013, 08:52 PM Thread Starter
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Mold Detection

Does anybody know about training a dog in mold detection? Anybody heard of people using this service? Teddy needs a job
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-27-2013, 09:42 PM
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Training to detect scents is pretty simple. Find something the dog LOVES. A toy is best but food works, too.

Start simple. Place the toy or food inside an open box while the dog is watching you. Give the dog your command (Find It, Go Hunt, whatever you want) and release them. They should go right to the box (they SAW you drop the item in there). When they get the item - REWARD! It can be more food or playing with their toy.

I've just started Mauser in Intro to Nosework class and this is how we are going. Mauser LOVESLOVESLOVES tennis balls. I took one and cut it into little pieces. I have another t-ball on a rope. That get's hidden behind my back. I place the piece of tennis ball in a box and send him to find it. When he finds it I whip out the ball on the string and we play tug for a minute or two.

We started with just one box. Now we are working on many boxes, different shapes and sizes and when I place the item inside the box I close the box.

This is what my trainer (and I'm sure others) calls building the Hunt Drive - the desire to find their object. Once you have a dog actively hunting until they find their object, you start adding the 'scent' to the object. So, if you wanted to train to find mold you would get some mold and place it in the box with their object and then have the dog hunt. The dog will start associating the scent with their object and then you can remove the object.

That is a very simplified description but it's a starting place.
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-27-2013, 09:45 PM Thread Starter
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Training to detect scents is pretty simple. Find something the dog LOVES. A toy is best but food works, too.

Start simple. Place the toy or food inside an open box while the dog is watching you. Give the dog your command (Find It, Go Hunt, whatever you want) and release them. They should go right to the box (they SAW you drop the item in there). When they get the item - REWARD! It can be more food or playing with their toy.

I've just started Mauser in Intro to Nosework class and this is how we are going. Mauser LOVESLOVESLOVES tennis balls. I took one and cut it into little pieces. I have another t-ball on a rope. That get's hidden behind my back. I place the piece of tennis ball in a box and send him to find it. When he finds it I whip out the ball on the string and we play tug for a minute or two.

We started with just one box. Now we are working on many boxes, different shapes and sizes and when I place the item inside the box I close the box.

This is what my trainer (and I'm sure others) calls building the Hunt Drive - the desire to find their object. Once you have a dog actively hunting until they find their object, you start adding the 'scent' to the object. So, if you wanted to train to find mold you would get some mold and place it in the box with their object and then have the dog hunt. The dog will start associating the scent with their object and then you can remove the object.

That is a very simplified description but it's a starting place.

Thanks for the response. Im more looking into the actual business side of this. I'm only finding a few online who do this service.
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-27-2013, 09:47 PM
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I don't know that I'd want my dog searching out mold. I know of someone who lost a dog due to getting a bad fungal infection in the sinus's. He was a search dog, and was put in an area to search with mold present. It ended up killing him.
Maybe bedbug detection would be profitable and not as dangerous. Though debugging him after he's been exposed may also be a bit dicey.

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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-27-2013, 10:08 PM Thread Starter
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I don't know that I'd want my dog searching out mold. I know of someone who lost a dog due to getting a bad fungal infection in the sinus's. He was a search dog, and was put in an area to search with mold present. It ended up killing him.
Maybe bedbug detection would be profitable and not as dangerous. Though debugging him after he's been exposed may also be a bit dicey.
I'm not messing with bed bugs. If I choose something else it would be termites
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-27-2013, 10:20 PM
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Not sure your location, but this is a pretty lucrative gig....everyone wants antlers for dog chews! https://www.germanshepherds.com/forum...t-antlers.html

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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-27-2013, 10:38 PM
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IT is true that training a detection dog is not rocket science but just as important, if not more so, than training to locate and detect is to NOT indicate on something that is not what you are looking for. Nothing like ripping out a wall and finding nothing there, ooooops! Nosework sport odors are unique and strong, but the difference between a bad mold and something minor or not so bad or a termite and a japanese beetle grub may be very delicate. Not to mention the lower quantities and higher interfering odors of soil etc. Also figure many houses, particularly older ones are going to have dangerous chemicals (such as dursban) that last for many many many years in that soil.

I have worked a cadaver dog for about 5 years and have had no oopsies but have heard of some big ones.......

If I were doing something like molds or termites, I would be looking into a JRT or other small dog due to search areas. I have been in crawlspaces with my GSD and it can be pretty tight and nails, electrical wiring, etc.

Why not contact some of the companies who do this and see if they are willing to give it a go with you. It looks like the dog is just part of the operation for most of them. Are you certain your dog has the requisite drives and nerve strength. A lot of dogs really do not like being in dark confined spaces.

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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-28-2013, 09:30 AM
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I would do termites or bedbugs, or something that is not so dangerous to inhale or disturb. Mold is very dangerous, and cheap/easy to detect without a dog. When we suspected mold in our apartment it only cost me $8 to prove it and the landlord moved us within 3 days and gutted the place.
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 01-29-2013, 05:06 AM
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My mum has a termite detection cat LOL
She used to wonder why the cat would always be so fascinated by this one particular wall, trying got climb it etc.
When she got a pest control person in they found termites in that wall LOL

Termites detection is probably more sought for than mould?
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