Correcting Rude Behavior - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #1 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-02-2012, 01:36 PM Thread Starter
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Correcting Rude Behavior

Since we got Mox last year, she seems to have a problem respecting our 2 year old daughter, and now our 9 month old son. She isn't aggressive or anything, she is just rude to them. She pushes past our daughter in the hallway, often knocking her down or into the wall. She knocks her down quite often. She just doesn't care that our fdaughter is in the way when she (Mox) is trying to get somewhere. Instead of waiting, walking behind her, or giving our daughter a wide berth, she just bumps into her and keeps going. For our son, he's now crawling, and she steps over him to get somewhere....or jumps over him.

I really am not sure what to do. I tried telling her "No" firmly. I tried leashing her around our kids. Just not sure what to do. She doesn't do it to me, and she's fairly protective and vigilant when it comes to our kids. I just want her to respect our children because she is a lot bigger than them and could inadvertently hurt them.

Ashley
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post #2 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-02-2012, 03:05 PM
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Is she aware of her body size? My female never 'got' that she grew. She knocked over everything in her path! Little kids and big dogs seem to always have that issue. I don't have a clue how to train this out, but I feel your pain. My first couple males knocked my youngest son down often. They turned back to check him out if he cried... but otherwise they were oblivious.

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post #3 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-02-2012, 03:34 PM
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I sometimes think that this is why lots of bigger dogs end up in shelters I don't know if there is a way to train this out of them. My oldest dog used to steal my nieces bottle, boy did she cry when the dog took it and ran. She ran to the other side of the room, holding the bottle and watching the baby cry.I think she was trying to get the baby to play. I found it funny...I know I'm a bad auntie, but boy does my niece laugh when I tell her the story now that she is older. When we were younger I can remember one of our first dogs knocking my sister down in the play pen..everytime she stood up the dog would nose her in her belly and she would land on her butt crying. My sister kept trying to stand up, eventually my sister would fall down on her own and laugh when she seen the dog coming(it became a game for both of them). That dog turned into her dog 100% as she got older.

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post #4 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-02-2012, 03:50 PM
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Your dog needs to respect your childrens space. This is disrespectful pack behavior, a bitch that was any kind of mother would not allow another dog to routinely trample her pups. Think of your children as your pups, if the dog starts nosing them to intrusively a strong verbal correction, and walk over to the child maintaining strong eye contact with the dog. Literally stand over the child and loom over the dog maintaining eye contact. Keep moving forward until the dog backs off. Remain standing over the child until the dog completely backs off and turns to do something else or sits lies down. Repeating this on a regular basis will teach your dog to respect the children because they belong to you, they are your most covetted possessions. In otherwards resource guard your kids. If she is going by the kids and a collision is about to ensue do the same thing.
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post #5 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-02-2012, 04:24 PM
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Blitz - EXCELLENT advice!! I've never seen that advice before, but it makes prefect sense!

On a similar note, how do you stop that rude behavior when it's toward adults?
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post #6 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-02-2012, 04:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blitzkrieg1 View Post
Your dog needs to respect your childrens space. This is disrespectful pack behavior, a bitch that was any kind of mother would not allow another dog to routinely trample her pups. Think of your children as your pups, if the dog starts nosing them to intrusively a strong verbal correction, and walk over to the child maintaining strong eye contact with the dog. Literally stand over the child and loom over the dog maintaining eye contact. Keep moving forward until the dog backs off. Remain standing over the child until the dog completely backs off and turns to do something else or sits lies down. Repeating this on a regular basis will teach your dog to respect the children because they belong to you, they are your most covetted possessions. In otherwards resource guard your kids. If she is going by the kids and a collision is about to ensue do the same thing.
The dog isn't nosing them, the dog is running past them and jumping over them. That would require a pretty quick reaction. Quicker then most people would normally have, especially with two young kids. I can see putting the dog on a leash and teaching them how to walk past the kids or around them..but even this would have to be VERY consistent for the dog to get it. My dog is not around kids alot, but she is quite calm around them when she is...no training, that is just how she is.

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post #7 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-02-2012, 04:59 PM
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Ashley - do you like training? Is it fun for you and your dog? If so, looking at shaping behaviors and building body awareness so your dog understands it could completely change things. I am not going to yammer on about all the possibilities if you aren't interested and would rather go another route!





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post #8 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-03-2012, 12:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olivers mama View Post
Blitz - EXCELLENT advice!! I've never seen that advice before, but it makes prefect sense!

On a similar note, how do you stop that rude behavior when it's toward adults?
If it is towards you; training, NILIF treatment. If towards others: mange it by teaching your dog, to sit and wait, keep him on leash in the presence of others or distract him with play.
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post #9 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-03-2012, 12:21 AM
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i taught my children to move out of the dogs way. my
children loved it when my dog jumped over them. sometimes
they would lay down side by side so the dog could jump over them.

Last edited by doggiedad; 09-03-2012 at 12:24 AM.
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post #10 of 28 (permalink) Old 09-03-2012, 12:25 AM
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oh doggiedad, for once i agree with you COMPLETELY. lolol...

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