Reactive Dogs - How to stop from "charging" and barking at dogs? - Page 4 - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #31 of 47 (permalink) Old 11-22-2013, 07:39 PM
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Great blog with guidance for those reactive dogs!

Reactive Dog: Foundation Exercises for Your Leash-Reactive Dog | Animal Behavior and Medicine Blog | Dr. Sophia Yin, DVM, MS






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post #32 of 47 (permalink) Old 10-24-2014, 06:29 PM
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For reactive dogs, or really any dog that just gets over excited about other dogs on leash I would recomend the booklet Feisty fido. It did wonder for myself and Vega, who didn't know how to greet/what to do when she saw other dogs on leash and would either get scared or excited, depending. Its a simple read but very informative and well thought out, plus, its a quick read!

http://www.amazon.com/Feisty-Fido-Help-Leash-Reactive-Dog/dp/1891767070/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1414189689&sr=1-1&keywords=feisty+fido
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post #33 of 47 (permalink) Old 10-24-2014, 10:09 PM
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Hard to diagnose over the internet but I agree 100% with Cassidy's mom to keep him out of excitable places for now. You don't want him practicing this behavior. Two things come to mind.
Ask your obedience instructor for guidance.
Get a copy of Control Unleashed.
You said that he is "okay" in dog parks. Given that he is so excited/reactive (and granted - being leashed can make this worse) I would keep out of dog parks for now. If another reactive dog comes in, you may have trouble.
The books and DVDs of Control Unleashed are wonderfully helpful..My dog was reactive after being attacked in puppy kindergarten, but is much, much better now at 8 months.

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post #34 of 47 (permalink) Old 10-24-2014, 11:10 PM
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If the dog is reactive because it is fearful of the other dog and is trying to get it to go away by barking, lunching, sticking its hackles up, etc, then correcting can produce a negative association with dogs and lead to more issues.

If the dog is maturing and becoming territorial on your property, personally, I would give the dog a verbal and possibly a physical correction, Knock that off!!! And, of course, a dog that cannot be trusted off lead, is not off lead. So that correction can be made, and the dog cannot rush into a neighbor and their pooch.

A quick, firm correction and quickly moving on, can be more humane than all the dropping treats, and teaching a dog to focus on you. This is because you are not allowing the dog to become entrenched in a bad habit. It is over in an instance and if it is clear, and strong enough to make a decent impression, without being abusive, then the dog is able to enjoy freedom sooner, the neighbors do not look at him like he is a cross between Hannible and Cujo, and the dog learns a boundary, and that you are in charge of that -- he doesn't have to be.

The problems people have with corrections are almost always more on the human end. If you are squeamish about it, just don't. You won't be able to deal a proper correction with the back up of good leadership. You will deliver an insufficient correction with a background and after math of guilt and apology.

It is not often helpful to liken dogs to children, but in some ways at some stages they are similar. There is a point in a child's development, when it is beneficial for him to view his parent or parents as a strong protector that is always good and right. As children mature, they will learn that their parents are not all powerful, all knowing, and even all good. But dogs do not need to get to that point. For them, even our mistakes, can be all good, if we pull them off with brilliance in the dog's eyes.

With children, we reason with them, and we offer choices. With dogs, it's my way or the highway. Their choices are whether they will chew on the antler or the hoof. They do not need to choose whether or not to bother the lady walking along on the sidewalk with her dog.

Furthermore, the timing of using treats for this sort of thing can also be a problem. If we drop a treat when Frisky starts to notice the other dog and begins his routine, we can actually reinforce the unwanted behaviors, rather than creating an positive association when other dogs are around.

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post #35 of 47 (permalink) Old 11-03-2014, 09:35 PM
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my girl just turned 6 months and old constantly wants to play with other dogs at class. Its horrible she barks and screams her head off and has no patience. This turns to frustration and has been lately snapping at the little dogs. But dogs her size or bigger its all play endless play. Trying to figure out how to handle this.
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post #36 of 47 (permalink) Old 11-03-2014, 09:57 PM
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my girl just turned 6 months and old constantly wants to play with other dogs at class. Its horrible she barks and screams her head off and has no patience. This turns to frustration and has been lately snapping at the little dogs. But dogs her size or bigger its all play endless play. Trying to figure out how to handle this.
If sometimes you reinforce her behavior by allowing her to play with the big dogs, then you are going to continue to have problems. Class time is work-time. "Eh! We're working!" Be consistent and do not allow interactions with any-sized dog at class. And, if you are taking her other places where she can go crazy with other dogs, you might want to reconsider that, as it is negatively affecting her ability to contain herself in class and learn what she needs to learn.

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post #37 of 47 (permalink) Old 11-04-2014, 08:42 AM
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If the dog is maturing and becoming territorial on your property, personally, I would give the dog a verbal and possibly a physical correction, Knock that off!!!

A quick, firm correction and quickly moving on, can be more humane than all the dropping treats, and teaching a dog to focus on you.
Would you be an advocate of using an e-collar in this situation??


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post #38 of 47 (permalink) Old 11-05-2014, 11:55 PM
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Would you be an advocate of using an e-collar in this situation??


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I am sure Lou Castle would give you more informed advice on the e-collar, but no, I wouldn't advocate using an e-collar in any situation. I would not want the dog to get shocked out of no where, where he is focusing on another dog. I prefer the correction to come from me, and the dog knows it is coming from me. I am just not a fan of e-collars.

Here's something somewhat related. When I had the solar-powered electric fence for cattle, sheep, and dogs, hooked up about 18 inches from the ground along my regular fence. The dogs would run up to the fence, put on the brakes, and look where the wire was, and then bark at whatever dog or person was outside the fence. They did not want to get shocked, and avoided that. But at least they could see the wire, and there was no mystery about where it was coming from. The wire was not to prevent barking at the trespassers, nor did it. It was there to prevent the dog from digging under or climbing over the fence, and it did do that.
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post #39 of 47 (permalink) Old 12-16-2014, 10:43 AM
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I have used an e-collar for reactiveness. It worked quite well. Basically using an "off" command. Cruz was terrible about lunging at cars. I men excessive compulsive full on attack at passing cars. I tried treating etc. to no avail. Basically through time and consistency with an e-collar, he no longer lunges at cars. He doesn't even pay attention to them. He used to focus on them, pick one out and lunge. Every once in a great while he still locks into one but a simple "off" command or sound from me and he unlocks on the car with no problem. It took awhile but we got there. No longer needing a stim.
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post #40 of 47 (permalink) Old 05-12-2015, 03:18 PM
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My newest thing is that I use the leash.. Make it spr short? I sit down so she cant drag me away? and I cover her eyes saying BLINDERS .. this makes her stop barking long enough that I can get her attn even for a second. My girl is 7 months old? im getting a lot of results with this? she had gotten to the point that even hot dogs wouldnt distract her pulling and barking. This was my plan B. Lol
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