Hypothroidism - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #1 of 25 (permalink) Old 12-11-2008, 10:46 PM Thread Starter
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Hypothroidism

If I suspect my dog has this. Is there any all natural remedies or things I can do at home to help?

I plan on going to a vet. I was just curious.

She is on a grain free diet now, EVO. Seems to be helping a little. She is over weight, sluggish and hates the cold.
Coat, nails and skin seem great.

~Kelly
Shelby (Tabby cat, 14 yrs old)
Lady (Golden Retrive Spaniel mix, 10 yrs old)
Bella (Beagle 8 yrs old)
Shadow (GSD 4 yrs old)
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post #2 of 25 (permalink) Old 12-11-2008, 10:54 PM
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Re: Hypothroidism

I'm not familiar with any, but I'm sure there are some folks out there that know. My dog has it and the only help for her has been medication. A trip to the vet as you mentioned is definitely a good idea.
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post #3 of 25 (permalink) Old 12-11-2008, 11:21 PM
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Re: Hypothroidism

I'm not aware of any natural remedies although supplementing with what's missing, even in a synthetic formula, is natural enough for me.

Thyroid meds are cheap, safe & effective. Years ago, I was thrilled when I found out my daughter's aging Toy Poodle had a thyroid condition, b/c it's such an easy fix, & I was so worried the poor guy was just losing it! He perked up, lost weight, coat grew thicker & he was much, much happier.
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post #4 of 25 (permalink) Old 12-11-2008, 11:41 PM
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Re: Hypothroidism

Please see your vet for a thyroid test first. Your vet can determine if and how much thyroid supplement your dog will need.

Amy
GSD Rescue of East TN

Liesel adopted 2/7/04
Judy rescued 1/16/05, foster failure
Trelkez owner surrender 9/27/07, foster failure

In loving memory of Jasmine 2/2/95-11/24/03, she has left this world but she will never leave my heart.
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post #5 of 25 (permalink) Old 12-12-2008, 12:26 AM
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Re: Hypothroidism

Hi Amy, new on this site, just got a puppy, a female named Gemma. Do you have a GSD, hard to find in Tn, yes we are neibors I live in Jonesborough, by Johnsoncity. Had to go to virgina to buy Gemma. I had a GSD for 15 yrs an she passed, no Dog for 8yrs. Now I'm potty training her. Fun Fun,,,lol anyway just wanted to say hey!
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post #6 of 25 (permalink) Old 12-12-2008, 12:56 AM
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Re: Hypothroidism

*blush*Absolutely see the vet. I assumed the vet would be consulted, doing the testing, diagnosis & prescribing. It's usually a straight forward diagnosis, but other health problems can share many of the same symptoms.
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post #7 of 25 (permalink) Old 12-12-2008, 03:27 AM
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Re: Hypothroidism

Quote:
Originally Posted By: Daisy1986If I suspect my dog has this. Is there any all natural remedies or things I can do at home to help?

I plan on going to a vet. I was just curious.

She is on a grain free diet now, EVO. Seems to be helping a little. She is over weight, sluggish and hates the cold.
Coat, nails and skin seem great.
If you are going to test, be sure that the free T4, free T3, and the TgAA (thyroglobulin antibodies) are run. To get those three things, you'll have to run a full panel with other stuff on it. The TgAA is the best indicator to test for autoimmune thyroid problems.

Sometimes the thyroid can be "sick" from other illnesses, such as tick diseases. If you treat for the other disease, then the thyroid will get better. That is not the most common scenario, but it does happen.

You can "boost" a thyroid using a variety of things, including herbs, other nutrients, glandulars. However, if the dog has autoimmune thyroiditis, then boosting the thyroid also boosts the autoimmune attack. So it's good to know what type of thyroid disease the dog has. The majority of thyroid problems, in both humans and dogs, is thought to be autoimmune.

Even with supplementation, you can still support the body. Grainfree, ample oxidants, treat for liver health, as most of the thyroid hormone is converted in the liver.


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post #8 of 25 (permalink) Old 12-12-2008, 02:16 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Hypothroidism

Thank you so much for your repleys I am calling the vet today.

This is my Beagle girl by the way. I found her on the hwy a year ago. She has been through some stuff!! Poor baby.

She just keeps this sluggish Eeyore personality, and I cannot no matter what I do get her weight down. I could just be her personality. But I just want to make sure.

In the mean time I just wanted advice to do anything else I could for her. They think she is 4. I think that is why her coat is still so good.

I will get the tests done. Thanks.

~Kelly
Shelby (Tabby cat, 14 yrs old)
Lady (Golden Retrive Spaniel mix, 10 yrs old)
Bella (Beagle 8 yrs old)
Shadow (GSD 4 yrs old)
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post #9 of 25 (permalink) Old 12-12-2008, 05:58 PM
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Re: Hypothroidism

I think that hypothyroidism is common in beagles?

I would also try to reduce as much grain as possible in her diet.


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post #10 of 25 (permalink) Old 12-12-2008, 07:22 PM
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Re: Hypothroidism

Beagles tend to have a hard time maintaining a good weight, anyhow. But much of that is behavioral. Beagles rarely meet food they don't like.

Yes, Lisa is right. Hypothyroidism is common in beagles. But usually, you would feel that in her coat too. http://clubs.akc.org/NBC/beagle_health_problems.htm

The sluggish personality is kind of a tip off to me that something isn't quite right.Beagles are usually pretty bouncy and active (often digging, barking, chasing, if not well managed). So I would bring her in. I'd run the test.

But my beagle pup doesn't like the cold much. I keep herding her out today. She keeps rushing back in.

Hard to say, Daisy. I'll be interested to know what the tests show.

What's your baby's name?

Daisy's beagle.
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