Geat study on spay and neutering - Page 3 - German Shepherd Dog Forums
 21Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #21 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-06-2019, 09:32 AM
Crowned Member
 
Jenny720's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 6,767
There are more risks for stump pyo with the oss procedure and many vets do not want to be held responsible if any complications arise. There is a local very reputable and highly regarded holistic vet in my area that when I was calling around quite awhile back and I spoke to them - they would not do this procedure or procedure keep one testicle in a retained procedure. There is a Facebook group that have a list of vets in the state that you live in that do this procedure. There are vets that do this procedure if that is the option you choose. Their are people who had the procedure done on that page and good to reach out to them in addition to the veterinarians. A good Facebook page in trying to look at when weighing out pros and cons. As I know that hormones are beneficial not to argue that but they are not the magic bullet as Muskeg said so for myself and my experience I also put that the scales. - It’s an individual decision.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by Jenny720; 06-06-2019 at 09:48 AM.
Jenny720 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-06-2019, 12:30 PM
Senior Member
 
Saco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 202
Here is another review: https://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/fu...ma.250.10.1155 (2017)

A few significant findings:

"Compared with spayed bitches, sexually intact females have a higher incidence (3 to 7 times as high) of mammary gland tumors. Historically, there has been general agreement that spaying has the greatest benefit for prevention of mammary gland tumors if performed prior to the first estrus."

"With regard to gonadectomy as a risk factor for lymphoma, a comparative medicine study that involved use of data in the VMDB revealed that sexually intact male dogs and neutered male and female dogs were twice as likely as sexually intact female dogs to develop lymphoma. Similar results have been reported in human medicine, with men developing non-Hodgkin's lymphoma approximately 50% more often than women. However, this association was not evident for the evaluation of the Animal Tumor Registry of Genoa, Italy, which revealed similar incidence rates of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in male and female dogs. Multiple breed-specific studies have related but inconsistent findings."

"Gonadectomy also is not a risk for the development of hemangiosarcoma in German Shepherd Dogs."

"Neuter status or age at gonadectomy does not affect development of osteosarcoma in German Shepherd Dogs."

"Interpretation of the literature related to behavioral changes after gonadectomy is further complicated by various definitions of aggression as well as comparisons of similar-appearing but potentially unrelated behaviors (eg, aggression, reactivity or energy level, and excitability). It is also possible that gonadectomy was recommended for some dogs as part of a behavior treatment plan, which would artificially increase the number of spayed or neutered dogs with behavioral problems. Because of these complicating factors, additional research is needed before conclusions can be confidently made about the effects of gonadectomy beyond the reduction of reproductive behaviors."

"In countries in which OHE is not as routinely performed as in the United States, the mean incidence of pyometra can be 23% to 24% of dogs by 10 years of age."

"Overall, gonadectomy appears to be associated with an increase in lifespan."

"Male and female German Shepherd Dogs gonadectomized before 12 months of age were at an increased risk for CCL tears, compared with the risk for those remaining sexually intact.14 There was not a significant association between gonadectomy and hip dysplasia or elbow joint dysplasia in German Shepherd Dogs."

But I urge you to read the entire thing and read the articles references for more details.
car2ner likes this.
Saco is offline  
post #23 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-06-2019, 11:55 PM
Crowned Member
 
Stevenzachsmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Maryland
Posts: 5,733
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuvShepherds View Post
That is a serious downside to rescuing puppies. I had a rescued male foster that was neutered when he was already mature, but developed significant behavior problems after neutering. My current female was spayed at 8 weeks. She had cancer and some other weird growths, and rare illnesses. As a result, and for other reasons, I would not adopted a dog again who had a pediatric speuter.
I am sorry to hear your dogs had those issues. So far, so good for mine. I will probably always adopt shelter dogs. There probably won't be any more puppies in my future. Getting too old for that. My next dog/dogs will be nice middle to senior aged dogs.

Jan
Shelby 9-2-14
Natty Boh 6-27-12
Annie 1998 - 8-2-12 RIP
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Stevenzachsmom is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #24 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-07-2019, 11:11 AM
Crowned Member
 
LuvShepherds's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 4,200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevenzachsmom View Post
I am sorry to hear your dogs had those issues. So far, so good for mine. I will probably always adopt shelter dogs. There probably won't be any more puppies in my future. Getting too old for that. My next dog/dogs will be nice middle to senior aged dogs.
Dogs are living creatures (I started to say people) and nothing is fool proof. My rescue is small for the breed and was tiny when she was found abandoned in a wilderness area. I didn’t get her until 4 months, so I assumed she was spayed closer to that time. Then I got her health records from the rescue including those from the shelter. The shelter spayed her immediately after they found her at 7-8 weeks, which was a huge risk, given her condition. She is a very special dog and I would have taken her in spite of everything, but it upset me that they wouldn’t at least let her go until 6 months before surgery. I understand the shelters require it. I think it’s dangerous.
Stevenzachsmom likes this.
LuvShepherds is offline  
post #25 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-07-2019, 12:43 PM
Moderator
 
car2ner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Maryland
Posts: 4,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevenzachsmom View Post
I am sorry to hear your dogs had those issues. So far, so good for mine. I will probably always adopt shelter dogs. There probably won't be any more puppies in my future. Getting too old for that. My next dog/dogs will be nice middle to senior aged dogs.
Sad to think that there are no more puppies likely in my future either. I have to be realistic about dogs out living me...sigh. All my previous females have been adopted mutts and spay. They all had good lives and lived many years. There are so many factors that rise on percentage and lower another. Many of us do the best we can and leave the rest up to God.

That being said, our big-boy is still intact and my gal-dog got spay at 18 months and I did study study study the pros and cons as best as I could.
Stevenzachsmom likes this.

about.me/car2ner
Patton CGC BH
Chief fetch fanatic

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

car2ner is offline  
post #26 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-07-2019, 12:46 PM Thread Starter
Crowned Member
 
wolfy dog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 9,364
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuvShepherds View Post
The shelter spayed her immediately after they found her at 7-8 weeks, which was a huge risk, given her condition. She is a very special dog and I would have taken her in spite of everything, but it upset me that they wouldn’t at least let her go until 6 months before surgery. I understand the shelters require it. I think it’s dangerous.
Shelters are paranoid in this regard: one step over their threshold as a dog and boom: spayed or neutered no matter their health. And while they are at it why not vaccinate for Rabies and all the other diseases (the seven or five n one vaccine) without taking research into account. It's the reason I won't adopt a dog from a shelter or rescue. I know their reasons but I wish they would be more flexible.
crittersitter likes this.
wolfy dog is offline  
post #27 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-07-2019, 01:42 PM
Crowned Member
 
Magwart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 5,360
@wolfy dog, you're way off base in your understanding of shelter medicine. There are nearly always state laws and local ordinances in play that determine shelter procedures. Flexibility is usually not a legal option: they usually have to euthanize what can't be speutered or vaccinated, as it cannot be adopted out. Entire litters of puppies end up dead in garbage bags in my local shelter this time of year. The litters are sometimes literally are dropped off and euthanized in the same hour. I wish I could show you pictures of what it looks like when they've put down several litters of puppies in a single day and stuffed them into trash bags to send to the dump. It's awful. I don't think anyone outside of these high-kill regions can really understand what shelter staff is up against with unwanted litters until they see it first-hand. The "flexibility" under the applicable laws is generally kill them, or adopt them out speutered.

Last edited by Magwart; 06-07-2019 at 01:46 PM.
Magwart is online now  
post #28 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-07-2019, 02:25 PM
Crowned Member
 
LuvShepherds's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 4,200
Speutering is better than euthanasia. I would like to see laws that take into account the age and health of puppies. I realize of they adopt out an intact puppy, they lose control over whether the dog is ever altered, but dogs that go to rescues should get a reprieve. Rescues usually hold on to an 8 week old until they are sure the dog is healthy. Ours was kept for 2 months and could easily have been spayed at the end of that time.
LuvShepherds is offline  
post #29 of 29 (permalink) Old 06-07-2019, 06:41 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Arizona
Posts: 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfy dog View Post
Shelters are paranoid in this regard: one step over their threshold as a dog and boom: spayed or neutered no matter their health. And while they are at it why not vaccinate for Rabies and all the other diseases (the seven or five n one vaccine) without taking research into account. It's the reason I won't adopt a dog from a shelter or rescue. I know their reasons but I wish they would be more flexible.

This is exactly why my last 2 GSDs ( age 1 & age 3) came from breeders as pups. I adopted 3 adult GSDs in the past from rescues and 1 of the girls was spayed early by her first owner (4-6 months old range). She suffered her entire life from on inverted vulva with infections. It was a constant struggle. She should've never been spayed that early. It broke my heart to see her suffer. I will never over vaccinate or spay or neuter early.
wolfy dog and Custom Billet like this.
crittersitter is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome