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post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old 10-16-2015, 10:54 AM Thread Starter
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Flash is my medical response service dog for my PTSD. Today, I went down to my son's school to discuss a situation with one of his classes. While waiting in the office, I was approached by someone who asked me to remove my dog from the premises and then told me that he can't be here. He is vested, laying in a relax at my feet. I took the time to explain that he is a service dog and was then told he was okay, but only after the assistant went off to check the rules with others.

Sometimes, I wish that training would be more common with people.
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post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old 10-16-2015, 11:06 AM
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I am sorry you had that experience. I actually work inside our school system with student with disabilities. We have a student that has seizures and when she transferred to our system she brought her service dog with her. We had a lot of employees and parents complain at first but after a while of him being there everyone became comfortable and realized he was the most well mannered and attentive dog I have probably ever seen. It still amazes me how this child(a 12 yr. old) has such a bond with this dog. The only issue we have now is other people wanting to play and pet her dog, which she has learned to calmly explain that he is a service dog and it would not be in HER best interest if they did so.
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post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old 10-16-2015, 11:21 AM
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I am sorry you had that experience. I actually work inside our school system with student with disabilities. We have a student that has seizures and when she transferred to our system she brought her service dog with her. We had a lot of employees and parents complain at first but after a while of him being there everyone became comfortable and realized he was the most well mannered and attentive dog I have probably ever seen. It still amazes me how this child(a 12 yr. old) has such a bond with this dog. The only issue we have now is other people wanting to play and pet her dog, which she has learned to calmly explain that he is a service dog and it would not be in HER best interest if they did so.
My neighbor has a daughter, "Jane", in 3rd grade. Jane is severely allergic to dogs. A child in Jane's class has a service dog. My neighbor did not complain but it is a problem for Jane. I really don't know what the answer is in a situation like that. The child needs his service dog but Jane has health problems as well. I guess I am wondering what people on this board would think about that situation.
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post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old 10-16-2015, 11:23 AM
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My neighbor has a daughter, "Jane", in 3rd grade. Jane is severely allergic to dogs. A child in Jane's class has a service dog. My neighbor did not complain but it is a problem for Jane. I really don't know what the answer is in a situation like that. The child needs his service dog but Jane has health problems as well. I guess I am wondering what people on this board would think about that situation.
I don't know, that is a hard one. Could they place the two children in different classrooms?
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post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old 10-16-2015, 11:26 AM
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Flash is my medical response service dog for my PTSD. Today, I went down to my son's school to discuss a situation with one of his classes. While waiting in the office, I was approached by someone who asked me to remove my dog from the premises and then told me that he can't be here. He is vested, laying in a relax at my feet. I took the time to explain that he is a service dog and was then told he was okay, but only after the assistant went off to check the rules with others.

Sometimes, I wish that training would be more common with people.
That is frustrating, but at least they let you keep your service dog with you after they assessed the situation. I am sure that the deal with a lot of PIA parents all the time and are continually on alert. i am not trying to excuse their behavior just explain it.
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post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old 10-16-2015, 11:31 AM
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I don't know, that is a hard one. Could they place the two children in different classrooms?
The problem is that the school never told the parents that there was a service dog in the classroom. I guess my neighbor only found out after school had been in session for a few weeks. At that point her daughter would have had to move out of a classroom she had settled into. So my neighbor is just trying to keep her daughter away from the dog. Sometimes I wonder if this Principal has any common sense. I am grateful that my kids are no longer in this school.
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post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old 10-16-2015, 11:33 AM
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Per Georgia State Law for our systems, we cannot deny a child or their service dog. That is setting the school system up for a lawsuit. The solution for that should be that the children are in separate classrooms. So it is not considered discriminative both parents/guardians should be present for a meeting to determine who is more comfortable leaving the classroom. The school itself cannot decide Jane Doe has to leave because of her allergies or Ally Mae should leave because of her service dog causing the reaction. The goal is for the parents of the two children to come together and decide what they are comfortable with. If that fails then the administrator will hold a tribunal with the superintendent and other board members to decide what appropriate placement is based upon each child's academic skill level and whether or not the said children have 504 or IEP plans. In which case those documents are legally binding. Sorry for the summary
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post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old 10-16-2015, 11:39 AM
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The problem is that the school never told the parents that there was a service dog in the classroom. I guess my neighbor only found out after school had been in session for a few weeks. At that point her daughter would have had to move out of a classroom she had settled into. So my neighbor is just trying to keep her daughter away from the dog. Sometimes I wonder if this Principal has any common sense. I am grateful that my kids are no longer in this school.
BTW...look up the united states department of education. If the parents of the child with allergies to the dog reported this to the school at the beginning of the school year and it is part of her permanent record (there is a space for allergies listed in the forms the parents fill out every year.) The parents of the child with allergies might actually have grounds for a lawsuit or official complaint. Children with allergies or medical conditions are automactically flagged in our system. The school should have been alerted by the system when the other child with a service dog entered the classroom.
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post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old 10-16-2015, 02:53 PM
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Per Georgia State Law for our systems, we cannot deny a child or their service dog. That is setting the school system up for a lawsuit. The solution for that should be that the children are in separate classrooms. So it is not considered discriminative both parents/guardians should be present for a meeting to determine who is more comfortable leaving the classroom. The school itself cannot decide Jane Doe has to leave because of her allergies or Ally Mae should leave because of her service dog causing the reaction. The goal is for the parents of the two children to come together and decide what they are comfortable with. If that fails then the administrator will hold a tribunal with the superintendent and other board members to decide what appropriate placement is based upon each child's academic skill level and whether or not the said children have 504 or IEP plans. In which case those documents are legally binding. Sorry for the summary
Thanks. I get what your saying and I am familiar with the laws. Our Ranger was bred in the Seeing Eye facility and we were raising him as a Seeing Eye dog (before the stinker flunked out of the program.) i am more frustrated by the school for not telling everyone what was going on beforehand. Then the whole problem could have been avoided. My neighbor does not want to make a big deal about it and is just hoping that keeping Jane away from the dog will work out.
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post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old 10-16-2015, 03:03 PM
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Originally Posted by FlashSD View Post
Flash is my medical response service dog for my PTSD. Today, I went down to my son's school to discuss a situation with one of his classes. While waiting in the office, I was approached by someone who asked me to remove my dog from the premises and then told me that he can't be here. He is vested, laying in a relax at my feet. I took the time to explain that he is a service dog and was then told he was okay, but only after the assistant went off to check the rules with others.

Sometimes, I wish that training would be more common with people.
Doesn't sound like a problem. You were able to educate them and they understood, which is nice I think.
The problem lies with people who pretend to have a service dog, only to bring their pets with them and the fact that service dog status is not regulated.
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