Question on medical aid and service dogs - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-13-2011, 09:02 PM Thread Starter
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Question on medical aid and service dogs

Does anyone have experience or knowledge of what would happen to a disabled person's service dog in the event of them needing emergency medical aid? What happens to the dog when the person is transported to an emergency department?

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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-13-2011, 09:09 PM
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Can't speak for what happens in the event of an ambulance ride as I never encountered that, but I worked a DOA with an older female GSD guide dog from leader dogs for the blind. The man lived alone, dog was inside when he died. The family was contacted and arrived on scene, but sadly would not take possession of the dog, even temporarily. Dept policy doesn't allow the dog to be taken by an officer. So animal control had to be called and she was taken there.

I personally raised a dog for the same group this dog was from, so I contacted them the following day (this happened late one evening, I contacted them the following morning) with the situation and they got into contact with the mans family who did end up taking possession of her from the shelter. I told them if they needed someone to take her in if the family wouldn't take her, that they could contact me, and they (the organization) were very grateful.
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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-13-2011, 09:48 PM
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When I was a medic, if there was someone handy to either come pick up or just take the dog and they weren't someplace like home to leave the dog, I would take the dog with and let the ER deal with finding someone to come take the dog.

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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-14-2011, 07:38 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you both for your replies.

Nora


Cain von Hena-C, VPG A, TT 10/19/2003 - 12/17/2009
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Dazzle von Linienbach, 02/07/2009
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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-14-2011, 09:42 AM
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When I arrested someone with a dog, I allowed them to call a friend to pick up the dog. If the person was not coherent, we would take the dog to the 24 hr vet for board . We had a k9 unit and one of us was always willing to transport. I would suggest that someone have a note by their driver's license with phone numbers and instructions for first responders. If someone is not consicious,the DL is the first thing that we look for
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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-31-2011, 12:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ladylaw203 View Post
I would suggest that someone have a note by their driver's license with phone numbers and instructions for first responders. If someone is not consicious,the DL is the first thing that we look for
I have a question related to this. I have an alert card in my wallet. I have it in one of the card slots, I chose the one I stuck it in because it sticks out pretty far. So is this a good spot for it and if I was unconscious responders would check my wallet? I worry that no one would even notice it. I'm at risk for dilation and dissection of the aorta and other vascular tears, which is abnormal so if that happened and I was unconscious someone finding the card and knowing to check for those could mean life or death.



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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-31-2011, 01:00 AM
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Quote:
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I have a question related to this. I have an alert card in my wallet. I have it in one of the card slots, I chose the one I stuck it in because it sticks out pretty far. So is this a good spot for it and if I was unconscious responders would check my wallet? I worry that no one would even notice it. I'm at risk for dilation and dissection of the aorta and other vascular tears, which is abnormal so if that happened and I was unconscious someone finding the card and knowing to check for those could mean life or death.

Could you get a MedicAlert bracelet/necklace, etc?

I know they know to look for those...
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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-31-2011, 01:03 AM
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I've looked into those. The thing is you can't put all the relevant information (that I'd need) on the cheaper engraved ones, and I can't afford the more expensive ones where you're paying for a service and the responder calls the number to get your medical info. Also due to allergies I can't get cheaper metals, which goes back to I can't afford one currently..


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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-31-2011, 02:12 AM
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All I ever looked for was med bottles in the purse, a drivers license, insurance card, and either a med alert necklace or bracelet. I don't know anyone that looked at anything else as we not only didn't have time, but it's snooping into things that's none of our business.

My best suggestion is to get the bracelet and say something short and to the point like "at risk for vascular tears." Don't need much more than that out in the field and the ER will pull up your record once you get there.

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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-31-2011, 08:47 AM
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Agree with the above....although in the photo it's pretty obvious, on scene there usually isn't time to really dig through things like that. It's not out of laziness, it's simply just too hectic at the time. They'll scan for a DL and that's about it. Any way to secure that card directly by your DL, in plain view? Strong double sided tape or something of the sort? Or if you really wanted to, laminate the card and somehow secure a light necklace to it, and wear it under your clothing?
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