Is this too hot ? - Page 2 - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #11 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-10-2019, 07:22 PM
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What about adding a couple misters near a favorite laying spot to help cool the area a few degrees.
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post #12 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-10-2019, 08:32 PM
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We are down in Florida where it can get very hot and humid. Our dogs are both indoor and out door - mostly indoor. I have to careful how much I exercise our shepherd - he is 3 years old so that he does not get over heated. This is him yesterday @ 7:30 am in the morning after about 20 min session of playing fetch after we did some obedience work. He was ready to go again but I stopped.
In the picture he does look overheated to me. 20 minutes of fetch seems way too long.
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post #13 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-10-2019, 08:59 PM
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Living in coastal Virginia it gets pretty hot and very humid in the summer. Our previous chow/saymoyed mixes did just fine outside for hours in the summer. They were acclimated to it from puppyhood. They always had access to fresh water and shade. Had a dog door to the garage where the concrete floor was cool. We installed a ceiling fan in the garage to keep the air moving.
Our current GSD is not acclimated. Being that I'm no longer working and home we never had the need to put her out alone while we were working. That being the case she is inside more than out. She gets cold in the winter and very hot in the summer so we have to watch for overheating.
I feel the important thing is acclimation. If a dog is used to being in the A/C most of the time high heat (especially if it's humid) would more of an issue even with shade and water.
Kiddie pools, fan if possible, plenty of fresh water and access to shade as mentioned and things should be fine.

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post #14 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-11-2019, 01:25 AM
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Humidity levels have a big impact on weather a pool is a good idea or not. A wet dog will not dry fast in high humidity. The moisture will cause a microclimate around the dog of an even higher humidity level greatly reducing the dog's ability to cool itself.
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post #15 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-11-2019, 06:51 AM
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In the picture he does look overheated to me. 20 minutes of fetch seems way too long.
You are probably right, so I give him breaks even during the 20 min session then we walk back to our house - about half a mile to three quarters of a mile and he carries his ball back in his mouth. In the house I just give him enough water to quench his thirst and cool him down for at least half an hour before giving him any more water and then a little later his breakfast. That works with him. Even with this, he is ready to go.
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post #16 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-11-2019, 08:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rana View Post
We are down in Florida where it can get very hot and humid. Our dogs are both indoor and out door - mostly indoor. I have to careful how much I exercise our shepherd - he is 3 years old so that he does not get over heated. This is him yesterday @ 7:30 am in the morning after about 20 min session of playing fetch after we did some obedience work. He was ready to go again but I stopped.
We are in Florida too and have noted that we need to do our walks early in the AM and late at night. It is a lot cooler in the shade in the backyard. We are in the process of getting new grass and a fence so that Marco will be spoiled rotten

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post #17 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-12-2019, 01:39 AM
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Today I decided to time Deja because of this thread. This afternoon it was 96 F in the PNW. So I played with her at around 9.00 AM when it was still relatively cool. The air was pretty dry. I had to stop after 5 minutes of fetch, totaling only 3 runs as I add obedience and impulse control. She was panting but not like the OP's dog in the picture. I can only imagine what 20 minutes will do. I think she will go on until she literally drops dead so I have to protect her against her own drive.
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post #18 of 18 (permalink) Old 06-12-2019, 08:03 AM
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Red and us are also located in the humid Florida weather, with the scorching hot temperatures during the day. We have learn to make a significant adjustment to his outside activities, because heath illnesses are a real threat for humans and canines alike. Our changes in his activities, are base on his level of comfort and his respiratory rate when he is having walks or "being a Dog" time; and they are as follows:
- We go for our walks early during the day, and in the early evening (as many others have pointed out).
- Have plenty of water available for your dog, dehydration on top of Heat exhation, can make things much worse, for humans and pets alike.
- There is no midday play time like in the cooler seasons, and if he goes out, is for toiletries and a brief walk around in the back yard.
- If we see him with a machine gun type of panting (very fast respiratory rate), we stop everything immediately, and go inside, no matter how long we have been in the out.
- If during our activity, when I pick up his waste, it feels that its very hot through the plastic; it is time to wrap up his outside time, since this is a reliable indicator of his internal body temperature.

These are, in my estimation, common sense things that can help us avoid heath illnesses in our beloved companions. Remember that their cooling system is not very efficient. They can not talk, and it is up to us to help them out, by identifying when they are starting to cross the line between long walks/play time/ fun; and the dangers of a heat stroke or even worse, death.
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Last edited by Soldes; 06-12-2019 at 08:06 AM.
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