Fentanyl and K9s - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 07-03-2017, 10:51 PM Thread Starter
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Fentanyl and K9s

Thought this was interesting...

WKYT Investigates: Lexington police change protocol to protect drug dogs
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 07-03-2017, 11:47 PM
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I never even thought of the dogs getting harmed by that. How scary.

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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 07-04-2017, 09:31 AM
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Fentanyl is extremely dangerous, even a small amount that is inhaled can cause a person to overdose. There have been many Police Officers exposed to Fentanyl. It is very dangerous for the K-9s and Officers while doing narcotics searches.
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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 07-04-2017, 10:13 AM
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I watched a story on TV a couple weeks ago about K9's and fentanyl . Pretty scary stuff for both dogs and officers.
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 07-04-2017, 11:06 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slamdunc View Post
Fentanyl is extremely dangerous, even a small amount that is inhaled can cause a person to overdose. There have been many Police Officers exposed to Fentanyl. It is very dangerous for the K-9s and Officers while doing narcotics searches.
Slam, what I thought was interesting was that it appeared to be unknown if Narcan would work on K-9's. In your experience, has it been used by departments and has it worked?
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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 07-04-2017, 12:11 PM
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We do not have it. Some Depts around here are issuing it to Officers to deal with overdoses. In my city of about 230,000 people we have several overdoses a week.

One Officer was searching s car and got some trace amounts of a white powder on his uniform shirt. Later on not knowing what the powder was, he brushed it off his shirt. That contact and subsequent inhalation of a trace amount of fentanyl caused him to overdose.

It is very prevalent and we encounter heroin mixed with fentanyl regularly. I don't know if narcan would work on a dog, I need to check.
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 07-04-2017, 12:30 PM
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Last month, I heard a NPR piece about a police officer rushed to the ER after accidentally inhaling a seemingly small amount of fentanyl during a house search. As if LE's job isn't difficult enough, this is truly frightening. I found a couple of articles suggesting that immediate administration of naloxone (narcan) have worked in a couple of cases, but it's a challenge to find hard data:


Naloxone kits help save Connecticut police dogs from overdoses

Q&A: Intranasal Narcan Use in Dogs - Urban Search & Rescue Veterinary Group
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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 07-04-2017, 12:35 PM Thread Starter
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It ridiculous that police departments and any other first responders do not have access to a drug that might save their lives. Drug addicts can go every day to a methadone clinic, courtesy of our government, and yet law enforcement just has to take their chances? What a mixed up world we live in!
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 07-04-2017, 07:28 PM
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Quote:
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It ridiculous that police departments and any other first responders do not have access to a drug that might save their lives. Drug addicts can go every day to a methadone clinic, courtesy of our government, and yet law enforcement just has to take their chances? What a mixed up world we live in!
I think it is great that we are looking beyond the impact this addiction epidemic has on the addict and acknowledging the impact it has on the wider community as well. LE is part of the wider community that is carrying a huge burden. I listened to a radio program the other day where they talked to LE about the toll it takes on them when they are being called to the same house multiple times in a shift to deal with overdoses.

However, I need to take exception to the idea that drug addicts are being given methadone that is paid for by the government. That is undoubtedly true for some locations, but simply not the case for most locations. My 28 year old son is an addict. As were two of my brothers. I buried both of them and I live in constant fear that my son will also die. I pay for his daily methadone. Believe me, it is not free in any sense of the word. I don't think our experience is outside the norm. It is the rule, rather than the exception, that people pay for their methadone.

I hesitated about responding to this thread. But then I decided that if we are to have any chance of stemming the tide of destruction that is addiction, we need to come out of the shadows and talk about it. This isn't a zero sum fight. Addicts getting help does not mean that others are losing help. Everyone should be able to access life saving medication and I can't think of ANY circumstance where a LEO would be denied Narcan when it was available simply because they "weren't an addict". We all count, or nobody counts.
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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 07-04-2017, 07:56 PM
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Sit, Stay said:

Everyone should be able to access life saving medication and I can't think of ANY circumstance where a LEO would be denied Narcan when it was available simply because they "weren't an addict". We all count, or nobody counts.

We are not denied Narcan, it is currently only issued to medics. A neighboring city has begun issuing Narcan to Police officers to treat addicts that overdose. As we are usually the first one scene and advise the medics when it is safe for them to respond. Police Officers should be carrying Narcan to treat the overwhelming number of citizen overdoses we encounter. There is more to it then just issuing Narcan. There needs to be training, policies written and a whole list of red tape that would need to be worked out, first.
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