Is a GSD Right for my Living Situation? - Page 2 - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #11 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-21-2017, 04:24 AM
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I don't think small house is a big issue. My boy and I live in a 760 sqft apartment, 3rd floor, with no backyard or what so ever.. He did get his own bedroom tho But we are so closed to everything, off leash hiking trail, dog park, nice neighborhood and a plaza with petco.

I took my boy to work once, he seemed pretty nervous and unsettled all the time, and I wasn't able to do anything that day because all I can think of is 'how is he doing.. is he getting bored? does he need water? why is he still asleep.. why is he still awake.. why why why...' Then I decided just work from home. it's easier for both of us, and my coworkers I now get to spend 4-5 hours with him everyday training, hiking and playing.. and he seems pretty happy without even thinking, why is my house so small
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post #12 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-21-2017, 08:20 AM
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I've taken every puppy for the last 20 years to work with me. Every day. Scarlet, who just turned 6 months old, goes with me. She sleeps the vast majority of the day in a big crate. If she's not sleeping, she's chewing on her bully stick. She's not nervous (at all, lol). I take her to the park on the way home from work, then she plays with the adult dogs at home.

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post #13 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-21-2017, 08:27 AM
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I don't think the size of your house matters much. You could have a mansion, and your GSD will be wherever you are. How nice that you can take your dog to work. I wish I had that option! I think that you sound like you will be a good and responsible owner. GSD puppies require training, structure, and boundaries, esp if you plan to take them into lots of public spaces where they will encounter new people and scenarios everyday. I, personally, chose not to get GSDs until I had a house with a yard. Sadly, I had to wait about 10 long years. I love to walk/hike, but I'm not a runner, so I wasn't sure how I could provide enough aerobic exercise for a GSD otherwise. Lots of people have successfully kept GSDs w/o yards though. I'm sure with planning you can make it work. I would try to come up with an exercise plan where the dog could get out and run, preferably off leash occasionally. And keep in mind that many, if not most, GSDs are not good dog park candidates. If you are renting, also have a plan for what to do if you have to move. I rented for years, and it was always hard to find a nice place that allowed my small breed...let alone a GSD. Most places that allowed pets stipulated no dogs over 30-lbs, and if they did allow larger dogs, they banned GSDs. I'm not trying to discourage you. I just wanted to mention some of the potential drawbacks, and I imagine you have already thought of them.
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post #14 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-21-2017, 08:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carmspack View Post
taking the GSD to work may or may not be a good idea.

good for your guilt about leaving the dog at home alone , but from the dog's perspective may never get rest , may not enjoy the mauling attention, may become territorial of your office and protective of you, may interfere with your ability to socialize after work or limit your going out for lunch.
On the face of it being able to take our dogs to work is an attractive idea. We love them, they love us, we want to spend as much time as we can in each other's company. But depending on what work a person does it can be a disaster even beyond the obvious reasons of being territorial, hindering the ability to socialize or go out after work. I remember my grandmother having the sweetest little Chiweenie. A great little lap dog. She was retired so she rarely had to leave home day to day. When she did, Maisie (her dog) virtually always went along. The only exception really being doctor's visits or going to the grocery store. Anything else, she went. On the rare occasion my grandmother would travel or have to go to another city for an appointment and would be gone all day - she'd have us dog sit for her. Let me tell you, that dog had so many issues with separation anxiety. You couldn't leave her in a room for 2 minutes by herself without her literally screaming and panicking, clawing at the door and ultimately tearing stuff up if you were gone too long. When you were present even if not touching her, she was fine just so long as she could see you. She also had no confidence around other dogs or even children or strangers.

Dogs need independent alone time. They need to be crated sometimes, we need to leave them alone sometimes. They should be able to sleep in the dark in a crate all alone, we should be able to crate them when we leave home (or just leave them if you trust them not to tear up everything). It's fine to take them along places, it's amazing even. Heck, if my job allowed for me to take my dog to work she'd get to come along now and then too. Just don't forget to help them forge independence and confidence by not getting them to feel as if you're always there and they never have to be away from you. Because eventually a time will come when they have to be apart from you and next thing you know, you're out a couple grand in sofas or the legs of the table are gnawed off

I'm sure the OP is aware of all that, but I know some people aren't. My grandma never could understand why that little dog would tear up pillows and couch cushions when she'd have to leave her for more than a minute or two. It was from years of never having to be apart from her. And she'd never crate her. "It hurts her feelings, she just screams and cries!" (Because she never had to get used to it!)
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Last edited by NerdicEclipse; 02-21-2017 at 08:42 AM.
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post #15 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-21-2017, 10:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carmspack View Post
taking the GSD to work may or may not be a good idea.

good for your guilt about leaving the dog at home alone , but from the dog's perspective may never get rest , may not enjoy the mauling attention, may become territorial of your office and protective of you, may interfere with your ability to socialize after work or limit your going out for lunch.
Quote:
Originally Posted by NerdicEclipse View Post
On the face of it being able to take our dogs to work is an attractive idea. We love them, they love us, we want to spend as much time as we can in each other's company. But depending on what work a person does it can be a disaster even beyond the obvious reasons of being territorial, hindering the ability to socialize or go out after work.
It depends on the individual person's type of work, their position at the company, their stability in that position at the company, their coworkers, the typical weather/climate, and so on. It's not possible to generalize.

If:
You have your own office or designated work space,

The ownership is independent (not a chain or franchise - when a chain store changes policy and bans dogs, every location in the country follows suit and dogs are banned),

The coworkers like large dogs, no one has serious allergies (that could be a deal breaker and very unfair to someone else),

You are quick and diligent about cleaning up all messes (including barf, waste outdoors, take the initiative to vacuum your work space frequently on your own time so hair balls don't accumulate, bring the dog's mat/bed home regularly and wash it),

Your individual dog has a temperament conducive to being around people, both familiar coworkers and strange delivery men/customers,

The climate outdoors is reasonably conducive to crating the dog in the car when needed (when the floor cleaners come, if a fire inspector is afraid of dogs and needs to crawl around the office for an hour, if a particular client is allergic or afraid of dogs, and so on!)....

Bringing your dog to work can be awesome. I have at least one of my dogs (usually both) with me, every day, always have. My house is also very small, but I don't think it matters much... the dogs just eat and sleep there.
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post #16 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-21-2017, 10:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WIBackpacker View Post
It depends on the individual person's type of work, their position at the company, their stability in that position at the company, their coworkers, the typical weather/climate, and so on. It's not possible to generalize.

If:
You have your own office or designated work space,

The ownership is independent (not a chain or franchise - when a chain store changes policy and bans dogs, every location in the country follows suit and dogs are banned),

The coworkers like large dogs, no one has serious allergies (that could be a deal breaker and very unfair to someone else),

You are quick and diligent about cleaning up all messes (including barf, waste outdoors, take the initiative to vacuum your work space frequently on your own time so hair balls don't accumulate, bring the dog's mat/bed home regularly and wash it),

Your individual dog has a temperament conducive to being around people, both familiar coworkers and strange delivery men/customers,

The climate outdoors is reasonably conducive to crating the dog in the car when needed (when the floor cleaners come, if a fire inspector is afraid of dogs and needs to crawl around the office for an hour, if a particular client is allergic or afraid of dogs, and so on!)....

Bringing your dog to work can be awesome. I have at least one of my dogs (usually both) with me, every day, always have. My house is also very small, but I don't think it matters much... the dogs just eat and sleep there.
Oh absolutely. If my work was a good environment for my dogs I'd definitely bring them from time to time. If I could every day I'd even be inclined to want to do that as well. There's nothing wrong with doing it, I didn't mean that. The point I was trying to make was just that people should also always get their dog used to being at home alone, in a crate alone, and all that. Sometimes very bad behaviors that are extremely difficult to break later develop when they don't have to be apart from their master at all.
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post #17 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-21-2017, 10:39 AM
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Originally Posted by NerdicEclipse View Post
Oh absolutely. If my work was a good environment for my dogs I'd definitely bring them from time to time. If I could every day I'd even be inclined to want to do that as well. There's nothing wrong with doing it, I didn't mean that. The point I was trying to make was just that people should also always get their dog used to being at home alone, in a crate alone, and all that. Sometimes very bad behaviors that are extremely difficult to break later develop when they don't have to be apart from their master at all.
Agree, the dog also needs to be able to settle and chill at home alone.
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post #18 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-21-2017, 11:51 AM
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I can see carmspack's point but having brought my dog to work for the last 9.5 years, it's not necessarily like that. As a matter of fact, having Traveler here is so "commonplace" that he doesn't get near the attention you would think.

I will say that I did lay down some rules both for the dog and for my fellow employees:

1. no feeding the dog.
2. no pooping in the office




Quote:
Originally Posted by carmspack View Post
taking the GSD to work may or may not be a good idea.

good for your guilt about leaving the dog at home alone , but from the dog's perspective may never get rest , may not enjoy the mauling attention, may become territorial of your office and protective of you, may interfere with your ability to socialize after work or limit your going out for lunch.
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post #19 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-21-2017, 12:13 PM Thread Starter
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Wow thanks for the great and thoughtful responses everyone! Separation anxiety is something I am concerned about so it's good to hear people weigh in on having some days where I leave my GSD at home. The good news is that I live within a 3 minute walk of where I work so the commute isn't adding excessive time away from home. I've reached out to I-Guard International in WA for next steps
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post #20 of 20 (permalink) Old 02-21-2017, 12:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Traveler's Mom View Post
I can see carmspack's point but having brought my dog to work for the last 9.5 years, it's not necessarily like that. As a matter of fact, having Traveler here is so "commonplace" that he doesn't get near the attention you would think.

I will say that I did lay down some rules both for the dog and for my fellow employees:

1. no feeding the dog.
2. no pooping in the office


Does "number 2" apply to both dog and coworkers?
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