One airline responsible for 50% of pet shipping deaths - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-17-2012, 07:58 PM Thread Starter
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One airline responsible for 50% of pet shipping deaths

Shippers beware....

More Pets Died on Delta Flights in 2011, but Why? | Pets - Yahoo! Shine
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-17-2012, 08:15 PM
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Something to note is the HUGE number of animals Continental ships- they ship far more than the others, and still have an extremely low death rate. I only ship Continental. If they don't fly to someone, then they have to come get their dog. End of story.

There are always going to be dogs who happen to die on flights, though the airline is not to blame. I know of several dogs who were discovered to have major heart defects, for example, that the broker lied about to the buyer and the buyer received dead dogs. Who's to blame? Not the airline.
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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-17-2012, 08:17 PM Thread Starter
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-17-2012, 08:23 PM
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Any statistic can be skewed to forward an agenda. If Continental charges less than half of what the nearest competitor charges, and has cornered 80% of the pet shipping market, then it would be a good thing if only 50% of pet shipping deaths are attributed to them. But those numbers are just made up, so I do not know if that is the case here. I guess just an overall warning about statistics.

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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-17-2012, 08:55 PM
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I had a great experience getting my pup from Delta. The people in the cargo area stayed past their shift and ran out to the plane to get Samson to me ahead of the rest of the cargo. No complaints.

Seems like most of their deaths were related to dogs that never should have been approved to fly in the first place (due to age, breed, time of year, etc) - by either Delta OR the shipping/receiving parties.

If you cut those out I imagine their death rate would be quite low. And, as selzer said, you have to take into account how many animals Delta flies vs everyone else. I'd also want to know how many pets were flown total last year - I suspect that although 35 is precisely 35 too many, it's truly miniscule in comparison to the total volume. And, too, as the article said:

Quote:
But a closer look at the records shows that the pets' owners may have been as much to blame as the airline.
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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-17-2012, 09:49 PM
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I absolutely refuse to use Delta. If you research shipping procedures and reviews from people who ship a LOT of animals and look at how many Delta has killed or LOST (oh, they've lost a lot more than they've killed!) it becomes much more clear.

I broke my rule ONCE and used them and it was nothing short of a nightmare.

I think some misunderstood the stats. If Continental flew 550,000 and had 58 incidents (and an incident is any injury or loss, even temporary, not just a death), that percentage of problems is 0.0001. The stories mention how many PEOPLE passengers the other airlines fly. ALL except Continental have heat embargoes, so they are the ONLY ones flying during those months. They also have the market cornered, as stated previously, and ship far more animals alone than the other airlines.

I don't see how any airline can be held responsible people's poor judgment in flying animals who don't have the temperamental and physical strength to handle it. Nervebags who freak out in a thunderstorm, for example, have no business on an airplane. When I picked one of mine up at Lufthansa cargo, the guys asked me if my dog was GSD like all the others, "how come my dog wasn't schizo"? Kind of funny, but kind of sad. The others were freaking out, spinning, had peed and pooped in their crates, salivating, shaking...nervous wrecks. Capri was sitting there quietly, looking around with a happy look, bone dry and clean.

I have (knock on wood) never had an incident with an animal not handling a flight well. If I flew a dog w/a health issue OR questionable/weak temperament, I would have only myself to blame for their death.

Hint: if your dog needs a Thundershirt, you'd better take the car.
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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-17-2012, 11:00 PM
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I use Continental too.

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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-18-2012, 06:13 AM
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I used to work for an American run airline at Dublin Airport several years ago. Another rival airline had flown an 11 hour flight with a dog on the cargo hold and when the flight landed, the owners discovered their dog had frozen to death midflight. The airline told the owners that the temperature controls had failed. However, the rumour circulating around all of us staff at the airport was that it was actually the captain who had forgotten to turn on the temperature control for the cargo hold.

I don't know which it was, but I just hope I never have to fly with Juno as anywhere we go that isn't within the EU would be a massively long flight. And having worked for an airline, and seen some of the crazy things I've seen, I reckon the general public would be freaked out at just how many mistakes and risks airlines take everyday. The stories I could tell would make you cringe.
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-18-2012, 09:08 AM
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It's too bad that Iceland has the strict rabies rules. I've considered flying a dog to Europe with an overnight in Iceland. That would make it two nice short flights. I would definitely not have a dog on a connecting flight. Those transfers and missed flights are the most dangerous. I read a story of a family flying their Golden out to Hawaii. The airline told them the dog was on their plane, when actually, the dog was missing. The dog ended up spending 24 hours in his crate before arriving in Honolulu.

Delta is the airline that lost Vivi, the valuable show Whippet in NY. It also lost a GSD that was flying with its military family to Germany. They had to change planes on the east coast and the dog freaked out and escaped it's crate. It was found dead on the Interstate. Delta always seems to have the high profile dog incidents.
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 02-18-2012, 10:24 AM
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Rua, I'm with you. Having family members and close friends who are pilots who won't fly their own dogs on their airlines, I am amazed at the people who don't really look into what exactly goes on. One of my pilot friends took a day off to fly one of my dogs home in the cabin with him rather than cargo. He flies his dogs Continental; they are the only ones, to my knowledge, that have the specific safety measures in place to prevent issues like you describe. The airlines who don't have a big business in animal shipping don't automatically take these measures; they are costly, as they take extra fuel.

Not just temperature, but oxygen is an issue. If they hit what my friend calls the "puppy die" (actually, it's a fire safety system thing) button, oxygen is depleted in that area. All that has to happen for this to occur is for someone to forget or not tell someone there are animals in there. By all crew accounts, these incidents happen far more than the rest of us hear about.
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